• [ABRIDGED] We aim to provide a holistic view on the typical size and kinematic evolution of massive early-type galaxies (ETGs), that encompasses their high-$z$ star-forming progenitors, their high-$z$ quiescent counterparts, and their configurations in the local Universe. Our investigation covers the main processes playing a relevant role in the cosmic evolution of ETGs. Specifically, their early fast evolution comprises: biased collapse of the low angular momentum gaseous baryons located in the inner regions of the host dark matter halo; cooling, fragmentation, and infall of the gas down to the radius set by the centrifugal barrier; further rapid compaction via clump/gas migration toward the galaxy center, where strong heavily dust-enshrouded star-formation takes place and most of the stellar mass is accumulated; ejection of substantial gas amount from the inner regions by feedback processes, which causes a dramatic puffing up of the stellar component. In the late slow evolution, passive aging of stellar populations and mass additions by dry merger events occur. We describe these processes relying on prescriptions inspired by basic physical arguments and by numerical simulations, to derive new analytical estimates of the relevant sizes, timescales, and kinematic properties for individual galaxies along their evolution. Then we obtain quantitative results as a function of galaxy mass and redshift, and compare them to recent observational constraints on half-light size $R_e$, on the ratio $v/\sigma$ between rotation velocity and velocity dispersion (for gas and stars) and on the specific angular momentum $j_\star$ of the stellar component; we find good consistency with the available multi-band data in average values and dispersion, both for local ETGs and for their $z\sim 1-2$ star-forming and quiescent progenitors.
  • Clumping and turbulence are expected to affect the matter accreted onto the outskirts of galaxy clusters. To determine their impact on the thermodynamic properties of Abell 2142 we perform an analysis of the X-ray temperature data from XMM-Newton via our SuperModel, a state-of-the-art tool for investigating the astrophysics of the intracluster medium already tested on many individual clusters (since Cavaliere et al. 2009). Using the gas density profile corrected for clumpiness derived by Tchernin et al. (2016), we find evidence for the presence of a nonthermal pressure component required to sustain gravity in the cluster outskirts of Abell 2142, that amounts to about 30% of the total pressure at the virial radius. The presence of the nonthermal component implies the gas fraction to be consistent with the universal value at the virial radius and the electron thermal pressure profile to be in good agreement with that inferred from the SZ data. Our results indicate that the presence of gas clumping and of a nonthermal pressure component are both necessary to recover the observed physical properties in the cluster outskirts. Moreover, we stress that an alternative method often exploited in the literature (included Abell 2142) to determine the temperature profile k_BT = P_e/n_e basing on a combination of the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) pressure P_e and of the X-ray electron density n_e does not allow to highlight the presence of nonthermal pressure support in the cluster outskirts.
  • Dark matter constitutes the great majority of the matter content in the Universe, but its microscopic nature remains an intriguing mystery, with profound implications for particle physics, astrophysics and cosmology. Here we shed light on the longstanding issue of whether the dark matter is warm or cold by combining the measurements of the galaxy luminosity functions out to high redshifts z~10 from the Hubble Space Telescope with the recent cosmological data on the reionization history of the Universe from the Planck mission. We derive robust and tight bounds on the mass of warm dark matter particle, finding that the current data require it to be in the narrow range between 2 and 3 keV. In addition, we show that a mass not exceeding 3 keV is also concurrently indicated by astrophysical constraints related to the local number of satellites in Milky Way-sized galaxies, though it is in marginal tension with analysis of the Lyman-alpha forest. For warm dark matter masses above 3 keV as well as for cold dark matter, to satisfy the Planck constraints on the optical depth and not to run into the satellite problem would require invoking astrophysical processes that inhibit galaxy formation in halos with mass M_H< a few 10^8 M_sun, corresponding to a limiting UV magnitude M_UV~-11. Anyway, we predict a downturn of the galaxy luminosity function at z~8 faintward of M_UV~-12, and stress that its detailed shape is extremely informative both on particle physics and on the astrophysics of galaxy formation in small halos. These expectations will be tested via the Hubble Frontier Fields and with the advent of the James Webb Space Telescope, which will enable probing the very faint end of the galaxy luminosity function out to z~8-10.
  • [abridged] We investigate the coevolution of galaxies and hosted supermassive black holes throughout the history of the Universe by a statistical approach based on the continuity equation and the abundance matching technique. Specifically, we present analytical solutions of the continuity equation without source term to reconstruct the supermassive black hole (BH) mass function from the AGN luminosity functions. Such an approach includes physically-motivated AGN lightcurves tested on independent datasets, which describe the evolution of the Eddington ratio and radiative efficiency from slim- to thin-disc conditions. We nicely reproduce the local estimates of the BH mass function, the AGN duty cycle as a function of mass and redshift, along with the Eddington ratio function and the fraction of galaxies with given stellar mass hosting an AGN with given Eddington ratio. We exploit the same approach to reconstruct the observed stellar mass function at different redshift from the UV and far-IR luminosity functions associated to star formation in galaxies. These results imply that the buildup of stars and BHs in galaxies occurs via in-situ processes, with dry mergers playing a marginal role at least for stellar masses < 3 10^11 M_sun and BH masses < 10^9 M_sun, where the statistical data are more secure and less biased by systematic errors. In addition, we develop an improved abundance matching technique to link the stellar and BH content of galaxies to the gravitationally dominant dark matter component. The resulting relationships constitute a testbed for galaxy evolution models, highlighting the complementary role of stellar and AGN feedback in the star formation process. Finally, the clustering properties of BHs and galaxies are found to be in full agreement with current observations, so further validating our results from the continuity equation.