• As part of our ongoing effort to investigate transit timing variations (TTVs) of known exoplanets, we monitored transits of the four exoplanets HAT-P-18b, HAT-P-19b, HAT-P-27b/WASP-40b and WASP-21b. All of them are suspected to show TTVs due to the known properties of their host systems based on the respective discovery papers. During the past three years 46 transit observations were carried out, mostly using telescopes of the Young Exoplanet Transit Initiative. The analyses are used to refine the systems orbital parameters. In all cases we found no hints for significant TTVs, or changes in the system parameters inclination, fractional stellar radius and planet to star radius ratio. However, comparing our results with those available in the literature shows that we can confirm the already published values.
  • Kinematical properties of CVs were investigated according to population types and orbital periods, using the space velocities computed from recently updated systemic velocities, proper motions and parallaxes. Reliability of collected space velocity data are refined by removing 34 systems with largest space velocity errors. The 216 CVs in the refined sample were shown to have a dispersion of $53.70 \pm 7.41$ km s$^{-1}$ corresponding to a mean kinematical age of $5.29 \pm 1.35$ Gyr. Population types of CVs were identified using their Galactic orbital parameters. According to the population analysis, seven old thin disc, nine thick disc and one halo CV were found in the sample, indicating that 94% of CVs in the Solar Neighbourhood belong to the thin-disc component of the Galaxy. Mean kinematical ages $3.40 \pm 1.03$ and $3.90 \pm 1.28$ Gyr are for the non-magnetic thin-disc CVs below and above the period gap, respectively. There is not a meaningful difference between the velocity dispersions below and above the gap. Velocity dispersions of the non-magnetic thin-disc systems below and above the gap are $24.95 \pm 3.46$ and $26.60 \pm 4.18$ km s$^{-1}$, respectively. This result is not in agreement with the standard formation and evolution theory of CVs. The mean kinematical ages of the CV groups in various orbital period intervals increase towards shorter orbital periods. This is in agreement with the standard theory for the evolution of CVs. Rate of orbital period change was found to be $dP/dt=-1.62(\pm 0.15)\times 10^{-5}$ sec yr$^{-1}$.
  • In order to determine the spatial distribution, Galactic model parameters and luminosity function of cataclysmic variables (CVs), a $J$-band magnitude limited sample of 263 CVs has been established using a newly constructed period-luminosity-colours (PLCs) relation which includes $J$, $K_{s}$ and $W1$-band magnitudes in 2MASS and WISE photometries, and the orbital periods of the systems. This CV sample is assumed to be homogeneous regarding to distances as the new PLCs relation is calibrated with new or re-measured trigonometric parallaxes. Our analysis shows that the scaleheight of CVs is increasing towards shorter periods, although selection effects for the periods shorter than 2.25 h dramatically decrease the scaleheight: the scaleheight of the systems increases from 192 pc to 326 pc as the orbital period decreases from 12 to 2.25h. The $z$-distribution of all CVs in the sample is well fitted by an exponential function with a scaleheight of 213$^{+11}_{-10}$ pc. However, we suggest that the scaleheight of CVs in the Solar vicinity should be $\sim$300 pc and that the scaleheights derived using the sech$^2$ function should be also considered in the population synthesis models. The space density of CVs in the Solar vicinity is found 5.58(1.35)$\times 10^{-6}$ pc$^{-3}$ which is in the range of previously derived space densities and not in agreement with the predictions of the population models. The analysis based on the comparisons of the luminosity function of white dwarfs with the luminosity function of CVs in this study show that the best fits are obtained by dividing the luminosity functions of white dwarfs by a factor of 350-450.