• Perovskite solar cells with record power conversion efficiency are fabricated by alloying both hybrid and fully inorganic compounds. While the basic electronic properties of the hybrid perovskites are now well understood, key electronic parameters for solar cell performance, such as the exciton binding energy of fully inorganic perovskites, are still unknown. By performing magneto transmission measurements, we determine with high accuracy the exciton binding energy and reduced mass of fully inorganic CsPbX$_3$ perovskites (X=I, Br, and an alloy of these). The well behaved (continuous) evolution of the band gap with temperature in the range $4-270$\,K suggests that fully inorganic perovskites do not undergo structural phase transitions like their hybrid counterparts. The experimentally determined dielectric constants indicate that at low temperature, when the motion of the organic cation is frozen, the dielectric screening mechanism is essentially the same both for hybrid and inorganic perovskites, and is dominated by the relative motion of atoms within the lead-halide cage.
  • Iron-based chalcogenides are complex superconducting systems in which orbitally-dependent electronic correlations play an important role. Here, using high-resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, we investigate the effect of these electronic correlations outside the nematic phase in the tetragonal phase of superconducting FeSe1-xSx (x = 0; 0:18; 1). With increasing sulfur substitution, the Fermi velocities increase significantly and the band renormalizations are suppressed towards a factor of 1.5-2 for FeS. Furthermore, the chemical pressure leads to an increase in the size of the quasi-two dimensional Fermi surface, compared with that of FeSe, however, it remains smaller than the predicted one from first principle calculations for FeS. Our results show that the isoelectronic substitution is an effective way to tune electronic correlations in FeSe1-xSx, being weakened for FeS with a lower superconducting transition temperature. This suggests indirectly that electronic correlations could help to promote higher-Tc superconductivity in FeSe.
  • Employing a 10-orbital tight binding model, we present a new set of hopping parameters fitted directly to our latest high resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) data for the high temperature tetragonal phase of FeSe. Using these parameters we predict a large 10 meV shift of the chemical potential as a function of temperature. In order to confirm this large temperature dependence, we performed ARPES experiments on FeSe and observed a $\sim$25 meV rigid shift to the chemical potential between 100 K and 300 K. This unexpectedly strong shift has important implications for theoretical models of superconductivity and of nematic order in FeSe materials.
  • We investigate the evolution of the Fermi surfaces and electronic interactions across the nematic phase transition in single crystals of FeSe1-xSx using Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations in high magnetic fields up to 45 tesla in the low temperature regime. The unusually small and strongly elongated Fermi surface of FeSe increases monotonically with chemical pressure, x, due to the suppression of the in-plane anisotropy except for the smallest orbit which suffers a Lifshitz-like transition once nematicity disappears. Even outside the nematic phase the Fermi surface continues to increase, in stark contrast to the reconstructed Fermi surface detected in FeSe under applied external pressure. We detect signatures of orbital-dependent quasiparticle mass renomalization suppressed for those orbits with dominant dxz=yz character, but unusually enhanced for those orbits with dominant dxy character. The lack of enhanced superconductivity outside the nematic phase in FeSe1-xSx suggest that nematicity may not play the essential role in enhancing Tc in these systems.
  • Muon spin rotation measurements have been performed on a powder sample of a-RuCl3, a layered material which previously has been proposed to be a quantum magnet on a honeycomb lattice close to a quantum spin liquid ground state. Our data reveal two distinct phase transitions at 11 K and 14 K which we interpret as originating from the onset of three-dimensional order and in-plane magnetic order, respectively. We identify, with the help of density functional theory calculations, likely muon stopping sites and combine these with dipolar field calculations to show that the two measured muon rotation frequencies are consistent with two inequivalent muon sites within a zig-zag antiferromagnetic structure proposed previously.
  • The lifting of $d_{xz}$-$d_{yz}$ orbital degeneracy is often considered a hallmark of the nematic phase of Fe-based superconductors, including FeSe, but its origin is not yet understood. Here we report a high resolution Angle-Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy study of single crystals of FeSe, accounting for the photon-energy dependence and making a detailed analysis of the temperature dependence. We find that the hole pocket undergoes a fourfold-symmetry-breaking distortion in the nematic phase below 90~K, but in contrast the changes to the electron pockets do not require fourfold symmetry-breaking. Instead, there is an additional separation of the existing $d_{xy}$ and $d_{xz/yz}$ bands - which themselves are not split within resolution. These observations lead us to propose a new scenario of "unidirectional nematic bond ordering" to describe the low-temperature electronic structure of FeSe, supported by a good agreement with 10-orbital tight binding model calculations.
  • The layered honeycomb magnet alpha-RuCl3 has been proposed as a candidate to realize a Kitaev spin model with strongly frustrated, bond-dependent, anisotropic interactions between spin-orbit entangled jeff=1/2 Ru4+ magnetic moments. Here we report a detailed study of the three-dimensional crystal structure using x-ray diffraction on untwinned crystals combined with structural relaxation calculations. We consider several models for the stacking of honeycomb layers and find evidence for a crystal structure with a monoclinic unit cell corresponding to a stacking of layers with a unidirectional in-plane offset, with occasional in-plane sliding stacking faults, in contrast with the currently-assumed trigonal 3-layer stacking periodicity. We report electronic band structure calculations for the monoclinic structure, which find support for the applicability of the jeff=1/2 picture once spin orbit coupling and electron correlations are included. We propose that differences in the magnitude of anisotropic exchange along symmetry inequivalent bonds in the monoclinic cell could provide a natural mechanism to explain the spin gap observed in powder inelastic neutron scattering, in contrast to spin models based on the three-fold symmetric trigonal structure, which predict a gapless spectrum within linear spin wave theory. Our susceptibility measurements on both powders and stacked crystals, as well as neutron powder diffraction show a single magnetic transition at TN ~ 13K. The analysis of the neutron data provides evidence for zigzag magnetic order in the honeycomb layers with an antiferromagnetic stacking between layers. Magnetization measurements on stacked single crystals in pulsed field up to 60T show a single transition around 8T for in-plane fields followed by a gradual, asymptotic approach to magnetization saturation, as characteristic of strongly anisotropic exchange interactions.
  • We report a high-resolution angle-resolved photo-emission spectroscopy study of the evolution of the electronic structure of FeSe1-xSx single crystals. Isovalent S substitution onto the Se site constitutes a chemical pressure which subtly modifies the electronic structure of FeSe at high temperatures and induces a suppression of the tetragonal-symmetry-breaking structural transition temperature from 87K to 58K for x=0.15. With increasing S substitution, we find smaller splitting between bands with dyz and dxz orbital character and weaker anisotropic distortions of the low temperature Fermi surfaces. These effects evolve systematically as a function of both S substitution and temperature, providing strong evidence that an orbital ordering is the underlying order parameter of the structural transition in FeSe1-xSx. Finally, we detect the small inner hole pocket for x=0.12, which is pushed below the Fermi level in the orbitally-ordered low temperature Fermi surface of FeSe.
  • We present a comprehensive study of the evolution of the nematic electronic structure of FeSe using high resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES), quantum oscillations in the normal state and elastoresistance measurements. Our high resolution ARPES allows us to track the Fermi surface deformation from four-fold to two-fold symmetry across the structural transition at ~87 K which is stabilized as a result of the dramatic splitting of bands associated with dxz and dyz character. The low temperature Fermi surface is that a compensated metal consisting of one hole and two electron bands and is fully determined by combining the knowledge from ARPES and quantum oscillations. A manifestation of the nematic state is the significant increase in the nematic susceptibility as approaching the structural transition that we detect from our elastoresistance measurements on FeSe. The dramatic changes in electronic structure cannot be explained by the small lattice effects and, in the absence of magnetic fluctuations above the structural transition, points clearly towards an electronically driven transition in FeSe stabilized by orbital-charge ordering.
  • Magnetoresistivity \r{ho}xx and Hall resistivity \r{ho}xy in ultra high magnetic fields up to 88T are measured down to 0.15K to clarify the multiband electronic structure in high-quality single crystals of superconducting FeSe. At low temperatures and high fields we observe quantum oscillations in both resistivity and Hall effect, confirming the multiband Fermi surface with small volumes. We propose a novel and independent approach to identify the sign of corresponding cyclotron orbit in a compensated metal from magnetotransport measurements. The observed significant differences in the relative amplitudes of the quantum oscillations between the \r{ho}xx and \r{ho}xy components, together with the positive sign of the high-field \r{ho}xy , reveal that the largest pocket should correspond to the hole band. The low-field magnetotransport data in the normal state suggest that, in addition to one hole and one almost compensated electron bands, the orthorhombic phase of FeSe exhibits an additional tiny electron pocket with a high mobility.
  • In this work we explore the overall structural behaviour of the [(CH3)2NH2][Mn(HCOO)3] multiferroic compound across the temperature range where its ferroelectric transition takes place by means of calorimetry, thermal expansion measurements and variable temperature powder and single crystal X-ray diffraction. The results clearly proof the presence of structural phase transition at Tt ~187 K (temperature at which the dielectric transition occurs) that involves a symmetry change from R-3c to Cc, twinning of the crystals, a discontinuous variation of the unit cell parameters and unit cell volume, and a sharp first-order-like anomaly in the thermal expansion. In addition, the calorimetric results show a 3-fold order-disorder transition. The calculated pressure dependence of the transition temperature is rather large (dTt/dP = 4.6 $\pm$ 0.1 K/kbar), so that it should be feasible to shift it to room temperature using adequate thermodynamic conditions, for instance by application of external pressure.
  • We report on a systematic study of the magnetic properties on single crystals of the solid solution Cs$_2$CuCl$_{4-x}$Br$_x$ (0 $\leq$ x $\leq$ 4), which include the two known end-member compounds Cs$_2$CuCl$_4$ and Cs$_2$CuBr$_4$, classified as quasi-two-dimensional quantum antiferromagnets with different degrees of magnetic frustration. By comparative measurements of the magnetic susceptibility $\chi$($T$) on as many as eighteen different Br concentrations, we found that the inplane and out-of-plane magnetic correlations, probed by the position and height of a maximum in the magnetic susceptibility, respectively, do not show a smooth variation with x. Instead three distinct concentration regimes can be identified, which are separated by critical concentrations x$_{c1}$ = 1 and x$_{c2}$ = 2. This unusual magnetic behavior can be explained by considering the structural peculiarities of the materials, especially the distorted Cu-halide tetrahedra, which support a site-selective replacement of Cl- by Br- ions. Consequently, the critical concentrations x$_{c1}$ (x$_{c2}$) mark particularly interesting systems, where one (two) halidesublattice positions are fully occupied.