• One-dimensional Majorana modes are predicated to form in Josephson junctions based on three-dimensional topological insulators (TIs). While observations of supercurrents in Josephson junctions made on bulk-insulating TI samples are recently reported, the Fraunhofer patters observed in such topological Josephson junctions, which sometimes present anomalous features, are still not well understood. Here we report our study of highly gate-tunable topological Josephson junctions made of one of the most bulk-insulating TI materials, BiSbTeSe2, and Al. The Fermi level can be tuned by gating across the Dirac point, and the high transparency of the Al/BiSbTeSe2 interface is evinced by a high characteristic voltage and multiple Andreev reflections with peak indices reaching n = 12. Anomalous Fraunhofer patterns with missing lobes were observed in the entire range of gate voltage. We found that, by employing an advanced fitting procedure to use the maximum entropy method in a Monte Carlo algorithm, the anomalous Fraunhofer patterns are explained as a result of inhomogeneous supercurrent distributions on the TI surface in the junction. Besides establishing a highly promising fabrication technology, this work clarifies one of the important open issues regarding topological Josephson junctions.
  • With the recent discovery of Weyl semimetals, the phenomenon of negative magnetoresistance (MR) is attracting renewed interest. While small negative MR can occur due to the suppression of spin scattering or weak localization, large negative MR is rare in materials, and when it happens, it is usually related to magnetism. The large negative MR in Weyl semimetals is peculiar in that it is unrelated to magnetism and comes from chiral anomaly. Here we report that there is a new mechanism for large negative MR which is not related to magnetism but is related to disorder. In the newly-synthesized bulk-insulating topological insulator TlBi$_{0.15}$Sb$_{0.85}$Te$_2$, we observed gigantic negative MR reaching 98% in 14 T at 10 K, which is unprecedented in a nonmagnetic system. Supported by numerical simulations, we argue that this phenomenon is likely due to the Zeeman effect on a barely percolating current path formed in the disordered bulk. Since disorder can also lead to non-saturating linear MR in Ag$_{2+\delta}$Se, the present finding suggests that disorder engineering in narrow-gap systems is useful for realizing gigantic MR in both positive and negative directions.
  • A prominent feature of topological insulators (TIs) is the surface states comprising of spin-nondegenerate massless Dirac fermions. Recent technical advances have made it possible to address the surface transport properties of TI thin films while tuning the Fermi levels of both top and bottom surfaces across the Dirac point by electrostatic gating. This opened the window for studying the spin-nondegenerate Dirac physics peculiar to TIs. Here we report our discovery of a novel planar Hall effect (PHE) from the TI surface, which results from a hitherto-unknown resistivity anisotropy induced by an in-plane magnetic field. This effect is observed in dual-gated devices of bulk-insulating Bi$_{2-x}$Sb$_{x}$Te$_{3}$ thin films, in which both top and bottom surfaces are gated. The origin of PHE is the peculiar time-reversal-breaking effect of an in-plane magnetic field, which anisotropically lifts the protection of surface Dirac fermions from back-scattering. The key signature of the field-induced anisotropy is a strong dependence on the gate voltage with a characteristic two-peak structure near the Dirac point which is explained theoretically using a self-consistent T-matrix approximation. The observed PHE provides a new tool to analyze and manipulate the topological protection of the TI surface in future experiments.
  • The charge-current-induced spin polarization is a key property of topological insulators for their applications in spintronics. However, topological surface states are expected to give rise to only one type of spin polarization for a given current direction, which has been a limiting factor for spin manipulations. Here we report that in devices based on the bulk-insulating topological insulator BiSbTeSe2, an unexpected switching of spin polarization was observed upon changing the chemical potential. The spin polarization expected from the topological surface states was detected in a heavily electron-doped device, whereas the opposite polarization was reproducibly observed in devices with low carrier densities. We propose that the latter type of spin polarization stems from topologically-trivial two-dimensional states with a large Rashba spin splitting, which are caused by a strong band bending at the surface of BiSbTeSe2 beneath the ferromagnetic electrode used as a spin detector. This finding paves the way for realizing the "spin transistor" operation in future topological spintronic devices.
  • We have performed angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy on Tl0.5Bi2Te3, a possible topological superconductor derived from Bi2Te3. We found that the bulk Fermi surface consists of multiple three-dimensional hole pockets surrounding the Z point, produced by the direct hole doping into the valence band. The Dirac-cone surface state is well isolated from the bulk bands, and the surface chemical potential is variable in the entire band-gap range. Tl0.5Bi2Te3 thus provides an excellent platform to realize two-dimensional topological superconductivity through a proximity effect from the superconducting bulk. Also, the observed Fermi-surface topology provides a concrete basis for constructing theoretical models for bulk topological superconductivity in hole-doped topological insulators.
  • Bulk superconductivity has been discovered in Tl_{0.6}Bi_{2}Te_{3}, which is derived from the topological insulator Bi2Te3. The superconducting volume fraction of up to 95% (determined from specific heat) with Tc of 2.28 K was observed. The carriers are p-type with the density of ~1.8 x 10^{20} cm^{-3}. Resistive transitions under magnetic fields point to an unconventional temperature dependence of the upper critical field B_{c2}. The crystal structure appears to be unchanged from Bi2Te3 with a shorter c-lattice parameter, which, together with the Rietveld analysis, suggests that Tl ions are incorporated but not intercalated. This material is an interesting candidate of a topological superconductor which may be realized by the strong spin-orbit coupling inherent to topological insulators.
  • We have synthesized a new ferromagnetic topological insulator by doping Cr to the ternary topological-insulator material TlSbTe2. Single crystals of Tl_{1-x}Cr_{x}SbTe2 were grown by a melting method and it was found that Cr can be incorporated into the TlSbTe2 matrix only within the solubility limit of about 1%. The Curie temperature \theta_c was found to increase with the Cr content but remained relatively low, with the maximum value of about 4 K. The easy axis was identified to be the c-axis and the saturation moment was 2.8 \mu_B (Bohr magneton) at 1.8 K. The in-plane resistivity of all the samples studied showed metallic behavior with p-type carriers. Shubnikov-de Hass (SdH) oscillations were observed in samples with the Cr-doping level of up to 0.76%. We also tried to induce ferromagnetism in TlBiTe2 by doping Cr, but no ferromagnetism was observed in Cr-doped TlBiTe2 crystals within the solubility limit of Cr which turned out to be also about 1%.
  • We have synthesized Pb_{5}Bi_{24}Se_{41}, which is a new member of the (PbSe)_{5}(Bi2Se3)_{3m} homologous series with m = 4. This series of compounds consist of alternating layers of the topological insulator Bi2Se3 and the ordinary insulator PbSe. Such a naturally-formed heterostructure has recently been elucidated to give rise to peculiar quasi-two-dimensional topological states throughout the bulk, and the discovery of Pb_{5}Bi_{24}Se_{41} expands the tunability of the topological states in this interesting homologous series. The trend in the resistivity anisotropy in this homologous series suggests an important role of hybridization of the topological states in the out-of-plane transport.
  • The tunability of the chemical potential for a wide range encompassing the Dirac point is important for many future devices based on topological insulators. Here we report a method to fabricate highly efficient top gates on epitaxially grown (Bi_{1-x}Sb_x)2Te3 topological insulator thin films without degrading the film quality. By combining an in situ deposited Al2O3 capping layer and a SiN_x dielectric layer deposited at low temperature, we were able to protect the films from degradation during the fabrication processes. We demonstrate that by using this top gate, the carriers in the top surface can be efficiently tuned from n- to p-type. We also show that magnetotransport properties give evidence for decoupled transport through top and bottom surfaces for the entire range of gate voltage, which is only possible in truly bulk-insulating samples.
  • The topological crystalline insulator SnTe has been grown epitaxially on a Bi2Te3 buffer layer by molecular beam epitaxy. In a 30-nm-thick SnTe film, p- and n-type carriers are found to coexist, and Shubnikov--de Haas oscillation data suggest that the n-type carriers are Dirac fermions residing on the SnTe (111) surface. This transport observation of the topological surface state in a p-type topological crystalline insulator became possible due to a downward band bending on the free SnTe surface, which appears to be of intrinsic origin.
  • We report superconducting properties of AgSnSe2 which is a conventional type-II superconductor in the very dirty limit due to intrinsically strong electron scatterings. While this material is an isotropic three-dimensional (3D) superconductor with a not-so-short coherence length where strong vortex fluctuations are NOT expected, we found that the magnetic-field-induced resistive transition at fixed temperatures becomes increasingly broader toward zero temperature and, surprisingly, that this broadened transition is taking place largely ABOVE the upper critical field determined thermodynamically from the specific heat. This result points to the existence of an anomalous metallic state possibly caused by quantum phase fluctuations in a strongly-disordered 3D superconductor.
  • A combined neutron and x-ray diffraction study of TbBaFe2O5 reveals a rare checkerboard to charge ordering transition. TbBaFe2O5 is a mixed valent compound where Fe2+/Fe3+ ions are known to arrange into a stripe charge-ordered state below TV = 291 K, that consists of alternating Fe2+/Fe3+ stripes in the basal plane running along the b direction. Our measurements reveal that the stripe charge-ordering is preceded by a checkerboard charge-ordered phase between TV < T < T* = 308 K. The checkerboard ordering is stabilized by inter-site coulomb interactions which give way to a stripe state stabilized by orbital ordering.
  • We have performed angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy of the strongly spin-orbit coupled low-carrier density superconductor Sn1-xInxTe (x = 0.045) to elucidate the electronic states relevant to the possible occurrence of topological superconductivity recently reported for this compound from point-contact spectroscopy. The obtained energy-band structure reveals a small holelike Fermi surface centered at the L point of the bulk Brillouin zone, together with a signature of a topological surface state which indicates that this superconductor is essentially a doped topological crystalline insulator characterized by band inversion and mirror symmetry. A comparison of the electronic states with a band-non-inverted superconductor possessing a similar Fermi surface structure, Pb1-xTlxTe, suggests that the anomalous behavior in the superconducting state of Sn1-xInxTe is likely to be related to the peculiar orbital characteristics of the bulk valence band and/or the presence of a topological surface state.
  • The existence of topological superconductors preserving time-reversal symmetry was recently predicted, and they are expected to provide a solid-state realization of itinerant massless Majorana fermions and a route to topological quantum computation. Their first concrete example, CuxBi2Se3, was discovered last year, but the search for new materials has so far been hindered by the lack of guiding principle. Here, we report point-contact spectroscopy experiments showing that the low-carrier-density superconductor Sn_{1-x}In_{x}Te is accompanied with surface Andreev bound states which, with the help of theoretical analysis, give evidence for odd-parity pairing and topological superconductivity. The present and previous finding of topological superconductivity in Sn_{1-x}In_{x}Te and CuxBi2Se3 demonstrates that odd-parity pairing favored by strong spin-orbit coupling is a common underlying mechanism for materializing topological superconductivity.
  • The massless Dirac fermions residing on the surface of three-dimensional topological insulators are protected from backscattering and cannot be localized by disorder, but such protection can be lifted in ultrathin films when the three-dimensionality is lost. By measuring the Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations in a series of high-quality Bi2Se3 thin films, we revealed a systematic evolution of the surface conductance as a function of thickness and found a striking manifestation of the topological protection: The metallic surface transport abruptly diminishes below the critical thickness of ~6 nm, at which an energy gap opens in the surface state and the Dirac fermions become massive. At the same time, the weak antilocalization behavior is found to weaken in the gapped phase due to the loss of \pi Berry phase.
  • We report the effect of Sn doping on the transport properties of the topological insulator Bi_{2}Te_{2}Se studied in a series of Bi_{2-x}Sn_{x}Te_{2}Se crystals with 0 \leq x \leq 0.02. The undoped stoichiometric compound (x = 0) shows an n-type metallic behavior with its Fermi level pinned to the conduction band. In the doped compound, it is found that Sn acts as an acceptor and leads to a downshift of the Fermi level. For x \geq 0.004, the Fermi level is lowered into the bulk forbidden gap and the crystals present a resistivity considerably larger than 1 Ohmcm at low temperatures. In those crystals, the high-temperature transport properties are essentially governed by thermally-activated carriers whose activation energy is 95-125 meV, which probably signifies the formation of a Sn-related impurity band. In addition, the surface conductance directly obtained from the Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations indicates that a surface-dominated transport can be achieved in samples with several um thickness.
  • To optimize the bulk-insulating behavior in the topological insulator materials having the tetradymite structure, we have synthesized and characterized single-crystal samples of Bi_(2-x)Sb_(x)Te_(3-y)Se_(y) (BSTS) solid solution at various compositions. We have elucidated that there are a series of "intrinsic" compositions where the acceptors and donors compensate each other and present a maximally bulk-insulating behavior. At such compositions, the resistivity can become as large as several Ohmcm at low temperature and one can infer the role of the surface-transport channel in the non-linear Hall effect. In particular, the composition of Bi1.5Sb0.5Te1.7Se1.3 achieves the lowest bulk carrier density and appears to be best suited for surface transport studies.
  • We present a defect-engineering strategy to optimize the transport properties of the topological insulator Bi2Se3 to show a high bulk resistivity and clear quantum oscillations. Starting with a p-type Bi2Se3 obtained by combining Cd doping and a Se-rich crystal-growth condition, we were able to observe a p-to-n-type conversion upon gradually increasing the Se vacancies by post annealing. With the optimal annealing condition where a high level of compensation is achieved, the resistivity exceeds 0.5 Ohmcm at 1.8 K and we observed two-dimensional Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations composed of multiple frequencies in magnetic fields below 14 T.
  • We show that in the new topological-insulator compound Bi_{1.5}Sb_{0.5}Te_{1.7}Se_{1.3} one can achieve a surfaced-dominated transport where the surface channel contributes up to 70% of the total conductance. Furthermore, it was found that in this material the transport properties sharply reflect the time dependence of the surface chemical potential, presenting a sign change in the Hall coefficient with time. We demonstrate that such an evolution makes us observe both Dirac holes and electrons on the surface, which allows us to reconstruct the surface band dispersion across the Dirac point.
  • Topological insulators are predicted to present novel surface transport phenomena, but their experimental studies have been hindered by a metallic bulk conduction that overwhelms the surface transport. We show that a new topological insulator, Bi2Te2Se, presents a high resistivity exceeding 1 Ohm-cm and a variable-range hopping behavior, and yet presents Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations coming from the surface Dirac fermions. Furthermore, we have been able to clarify both the bulk and surface transport channels, establishing a comprehensive understanding of the transport in this material. Our results demonstrate that Bi2Te2Se is the best material to date for studying the surface quantum transport in a topological insulator.
  • We present detailed data on the unusual angular-dependent magnetoresistance oscillation phenomenon recently discovered in a topological insulator Bi_{0.91}Sb_{0.09}. Direct comparison of the data taken before and after etching the sample surface gives compelling evidence that this phenomenon is essentially originating from a surface state. The symmetry of the oscillations suggests that it probably comes from the (111) plane, and obviously a new mechanism, such as a coupling between the surface and the bulk states, is responsible for this intriguing phenomenon in topological insulators.
  • The angular-dependent magnetoresistance and the Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations are studied in a topological insulator Bi_{0.91}Sb_{0.09}, where the two-dimensional (2D) surface states coexist with a three-dimensional (3D) bulk Fermi surface (FS). Two distinct types of oscillatory phenomena are discovered in the angular-dependence: The one observed at lower fields is shown to originate from the surface state, which resides on the (2\bar{1}\bar{1}) plane, giving a new way to distinguish the 2D surface state from the 3D FS. The other one, which becomes prominent at higher fields, probably comes from the (111) plane and is obviously of unknown origin, pointing to new physics in transport properties of topological insulators.
  • We measured magnetotransport properties of PbS single crystals which exhibit the quantum linear magnetoresistance (MR) as well as the static skin effect that creates a surface layer of additional conductivity. The Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations in the longitudinal MR signify the peculiar role of spin-orbit coupling. In the angular-dependent MR, sharp peaks are observed when the magnetic field is slightly inclined from the longitudinal configuration, which is totally unexpected for a system with nearly spherical Fermi surface and points to an intricate interplay between the spin-orbit coupling and the conducting surface layer in the quantum transport regime.
  • We observed pronounced angular-dependent magnetoresistance (MR) oscillations in a high-quality Bi2Se3 single crystal with the carrier density of 5x10^18 cm^-3, which is a topological insulator with residual bulk carriers. We show that the observed angular-dependent oscillations can be well simulated by using the parameters obtained from the Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations, which clarifies that the oscillations are solely due to the bulk Fermi surface. By completely elucidating the bulk oscillations, this result paves the way for distinguishing the two-dimensional surface state in angular-dependent MR studies in Bi2Se3 with much lower carrier density. Besides, the present result provides a compelling demonstration of how the Landau quantization of an anisotropic three-dimensional Fermi surface can give rise to pronounced angular-dependent MR oscillations.
  • The magnetic properties of GdBaMn_{2}O_{5.0}, which exhibits charge ordering, are studied from 2 to 400 K using single crystals. In a small magnetic field applied along the easy axis, the magnetization M shows a temperature-induced reversal which is sometimes found in ferrimagnets. In a large magnetic field, on the other hand, a sharp change in the slope of M(T) coming from an unusual turnabout of the magnetization of the Mn sublattices is observed. Those observations are essentially explained by a molecular field theory which highlights the role of delicate magnetic interactions between Gd^{3+} ions and the antiferromagnetically coupled Mn^{2+}/Mn^{3+} sublattices.