• We investigate the emergence of anti-ferromagnetic ordering and its effect on the helical edge states in a quantum spin Hall insulator, in the presence of strong Coulomb interaction. Using dynamical mean-field theory, we show that the breakdown of lattice translational symmetry favours the formation of magnetic ordering with non-trivial spatial modulation. The onset of a non-uniform magnetization enables the coexistence of spin-ordered and topologically non-trivial states. An unambiguous signature of the persistence of the topological bulk property is the survival of bona fide edge states. We show that the penetration of the magnetic order is accompanied by the progressive reconstruction of gapless states in sub-peripherals layers, redefining the actual topological boundary within the system.
  • We study quantum spin Hall insulators with local Coulomb interactions in the presence of boundaries using dynamical mean field theory. We investigate the different influence of the Coulomb interaction on the bulk and the edge states. Interestingly, we discover an edge reconstruction driven by electronic correlations. The reason is that the helical edge states experience Mott localization for an interaction strength smaller than the bulk one. We argue that the significance of this edge reconstruction can be understood by topological properties of the system characterized by a local Chern marker.
  • We perform a thorough study of an extended Hubbard model featuring local and nearest-neighbor Coulomb repulsion. Using dynamical mean-field theory we investigated the zero temperature phase-diagram of this model as a function of the chemical doping. The interplay between local and non-local interaction drives a variety of phase-transitions connecting two distinct charge-ordered insulators, i.e., half-filled and quarter-filled, a charge-ordered metal and a Mott insulating phase. We characterize these transitions and the relative stability of the solutions and we show that the two interactions conspire to stabilize the quarter-filled charge ordered phase.
  • Mott insulators can be portrayed as "unsuccessful metals": systems in which a strong Coulomb repulsion prevents charge conduction notwithstanding the metal-like density of conduction electrons. The possibility to unlock such large density of frozen carriers with an electric field offers a tantalizing opportunity to realize new Mott-based microelectronic devices. Here we explicitly unveil how such unlocking happens by solving a simple, yet generic, model for correlated insulators using dynamical mean-field theory. Specifically, we show that the electric breakdown of a Mott insulator can occur via a first-order insulator-to-metal transition, characterized by an abrupt gap-collapse in sharp contrast to the Zener tunneling mechanism. The switch-on of charge conduction is due to the energetic stabilization of a metallic phase that preexists as metastable state in equilibrium and is disconnected from the stable insulator. Our findings rationalize recent experimental observations and offer a guideline for future technological research.
  • The magnetic properties of zig-zag graphene nanoflakes (ZGNF) are investigated within the framework of the dynamical mean-field theory. At half-filling and for realistic values of the local interaction, the ZGNF is in a fully compensated antiferromagnetic (AF) state, which is found to be robust against temperature fluctuations. Introducing charge carriers in the AF background drives the ZGNF metallic and stabilizes a magnetic state with a net uncompensated moment at low temperature. The change in magnetism is ascribed to the delocalization of the doped holes in the proximity of the edges, which mediate ferromagnetic correlations between the localized magnetic moments. Depending on the hole concentration, the magnetic transition may display a pronounced hysteresis over a wide range of temperature, indicating the coexistence of magnetic states with different symmetry. This suggests the possibility of achieving the electrostatic control of the magnetic state of ZGNFs to realize a switchable spintronic device.
  • We investigate the role of short-ranged electron-electron interactions in a paradigmatic model of three dimensional topological insulators, using dynamical mean-field theory and focusing on non magnetically ordered solutions. The non-interacting band-structure is controlled by a mass term M, whose value discriminates between three different insulating phases, a trivial band insulator and two distinct topologically non-trivial phases. We characterize the evolution of the transitions between the different phases as a function of the local Coulomb repulsion U and find a remarkable dependence of the U -M phase diagram on the value of the local Hund's exchange coupling J. However, regardless the value of J, following the evolution of the topological transition line between a trivial band insulator and a topological insulator, we find a critical value of U separating a continuous transition from a first-order one. When the Hund's coupling is significant, a Mott insulator is stabilized at large U . In proximity of the Mott transition we observe the emergence of an anomalous "Mott-like" strong topological insulating state.
  • Topological quantum phase transitions are characterised by changes in global topological invariants. These invariants classify many body systems beyond the conventional paradigm of local order parameters describing spontaneous symmetry breaking. For non-interacting electrons, it is well understood that such transitions are continuous and always accompanied by a gap-closing in the energy spectrum, given that the symmetries protecting the topological phase are maintained. Here, we demonstrate that sufficiently strong electron-electron interaction can fundamentally change the situation: we discover a topological quantum phase transition of first order character in the genuine thermodynamic sense, that occurs without gap closing. Our theoretical study reveals the existence of a quantum critical endpoint associated with an orbital instability on the transition line between a 2D topological insulator and a trivial band insulator. Remarkably, this phenomenon entails unambiguous signatures associated to the orbital occupations that can be detected experimentally.
  • We investigate by means of the time-dependent Gutzwiller approximation the transport properties of a strongly-correlated slab subject to Hubbard repulsion and connected with to two metallic leads kept at a different electrochemical potential. We focus on the real-time evolution of the electronic properties after the slab is connected to the leads and consider both metallic and Mott insulating slabs. When the correlated slab is metallic, the system relaxes to a steady-state that sustains a finite current. The zero-bias conductance is finite and independent of the degree of correlations within the slab as long as the system remains metallic. On the other hand, when the slab is in a Mott insulating state, the external bias leads to currents that are exponentially activated by charge tunneling across the Mott-Hubbard gap, consistent with the Landau-Zener dielectric breakdown scenario.
  • By means of Dynamical Mean-Field Theory we investigate the spin response function of a model for correlated materials with d- or f-electrons hybridized with more delocalized ligand orbitals. We point out the existence of two different processes responsible for the dynamical screening of local moments of the correlated electrons. Studying the local spin susceptibility we identify the contribution of the "direct" magnetic exchange and of an "indirect" one mediated by the itinerant uncorrelated orbitals. In addition, we characterize the nature of the dynamical screening processes in terms of different classes of diagrams in the hybridization-expansion contributing to the density-matrix. Our analysis suggests possible ways of estimating the relative importance of these two classes of screening processes in realistic calculations for correlated materials.
  • The BCS-BEC crossover in a lattice is a powerful paradigm to understand how a superconductor deviates from the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer physics as the attractive interaction increases. Optical lattices loaded with binary mixtures of cold atoms allow to address it experimentally in a clean and controlled way. We show that, however, the possibility to study this phenomenon in actual cold-atoms experiments is limited by the effect of the trapping potential. Real-space Dynamical Mean-Field Theory calculations show indeed that interactions and the confining potential conspire to pack the fermions in the center of the trap, which approaches a band insulator when the attraction become sizeable. We show how this physics reflects in several observables, and we propose an alternative strategy to disentangle the effect of the harmonic potential and measure the intrinsic properties resulting from the interaction strength.
  • We investigate the dynamics of a two-dimensional Hubbard model in a static electric field in order to identify the conditions to reach a non-equilibrium stationary state. For a generic electric field, the convergence to a stationary state requires the coupling to a thermostating bath absorbing the work done by the external force. Following the real-time dynamics of the system, we show that a non-equilibrium stationary state is reached for essentially any value of the coupling to the bath. We map out a phase diagram in terms of dissipation and electric field strengths and identify the dissipation values in which steady current is largest for a given field.
  • We present a new methodology to solve the Anderson impurity model, in the context of dynamical mean-field theory, based on the exact diagonalization method. We propose a strategy to effectively refine the exact diagonalization solver by combining a finite-temperature Lanczos algorithm with an adapted version of the cluster perturbation theory. We show that the augmented diagonalization yields an improved accuracy in the description of the spectral function of the single-band Hubbard model and is a reliable approach for a full d-orbital manifold calculation.
  • We investigate the anomalous metal arising by hole doping the Mott insulating state of the periodic Anderson model. Using Dynamical Mean-Field Theory we show that, as opposed to the electron-doped case, in the hole-doped regime the hybridization between localized and delocalized orbitals leads to the formation of composite quasi-particles reminiscent of the Zhang-Rice singlets. We compute the coherence temperature of this state, showing its exponentially small value at low dopings. As a consequence the weakly-doped Mott state deviates from the predictions of Fermi-liquid theory already at small temperatures. The onset of the Zhang-Rice state and of the consequent poor coherence is due to the electronic structure in which both localized and itinerant carriers have to be involved in the formation of the conduction states and to the proximity to the Mott state. By investigating the magnetic properties of this state, we discuss the relation between the anomalous metallic properties and the behavior of the magnetic degrees of freedom.
  • We study the doping driven Mott metal-insulator transition (MIT) in the periodic Anderson model set in the Mott-Hubbard regime. A striking asymmetry for electron or hole driven transitions is found. The electron doped MIT at larger U is similar to the one found in the single band Hubbard model, with a first order character due to coexistence of solutions. The hole doped MIT, in contrast, is second order and can be described as the delocalization of Zhang-Rice singlets.
  • We solve the Periodic Anderson model in the Mott-Hubbard regime, using Dynamical Mean Field Theory. Upon electron doping of the Mott insulator, a metal-insulator transition occurs which is qualitatively similar to that of the single band Hubbard model, namely with a divergent effective mass and a first order character at finite temperatures. Surprisingly, upon hole doping, the metal-insulator transition is not first order and does not show a divergent mass. Thus, the transition scenario of the single band Hubbard model is not generic for the Periodic Anderson model, even in the Mott-Hubbard regime.
  • We study the Mott metal-insulator transition in the Periodic Anderson Model within Dynamical Mean Field Theory (DMFT). Near the quantum transition, we find a non-Fermi liquid metallic state down to a vanishing temperature scale. We identify the origin of the non-Fermi liquid behavior as due to magnetic scattering of the doped carriers by the localized moments. The non-Fermi liquid state can be tuned by either doping or external magnetic field. Our results show that the coupling to spatial magnetic fluctuations (absent in DMFT) is not a prerequisite to realize a non-Fermi liquid scenario for heavy fermion systems.
  • We consider perturbations of the Hamiltonian flow associated with the geodesic flow on a surface of constant negative curvature. We prove that, under a small perturbation, not necessarely of Hamiltonian character, the SRB measure associated to the flow exists and is analytic in the strength of the perturbation. An explicit example of "thermostatted" dissipative dynamics is constructed.