• We present high-precision spectro-polarimetric data with high spatial resolution (0.4$''$) of the very quiet Sun at 1.56$\mu$m obtained with the GREGOR telescope to shed some light on this complex magnetism. Half of our observed quiet-Sun region is better explained by magnetic substructure within the resolution element. However, we cannot distinguish whether this substructure comes from gradients of the physical parameters along the line of sight or from horizontal gradients (across the surface). In these pixels, a model with two magnetic components is preferred, and we find two distinct magnetic field populations. The population with the larger filling factor has very weak ($\sim$150 G) horizontal fields similar to those obtained in previous works. We demonstrate that the field vector of this population is not constrained by the observations, given the spatial resolution and polarimetric accuracy of our data. The topology of the other component with the smaller filling factor is constrained by the observations for field strengths above 250 G: we infer hG fields with inclinations and azimuth values compatible with an isotropic distribution. The filling factors are typically below 30\%. We also find that the flux of the two polarities is not balanced. From the other half of the observed quiet-Sun area $\sim$50\% are two-lobed Stokes $V$ profiles, meaning that 23\% of the field of view can be adequately explained with a single constant magnetic field embedded in a non-magnetic atmosphere. The magnetic field vector and filling factor are reliable inferred in only 50\% based on the regular profiles. Therefore, 12\% of the field of view harbour hG fields with filling factors typically below 30\%. At our present spatial resolution, 70\% of the pixels apparently are non-magnetised.
  • Chromospheric observations of sunspot umbrae offer an exceptional view of magneto-acoustic shock phenomena and the impact they have on the surrounding magnetically-dominated plasma. We employ simultaneous slit-based spectro-polarimetry and spectral imaging observations of the chromospheric He I 10830{\AA} and Ca II 8542{\AA} lines to examine fluctuations in the umbral magnetic field caused by the steepening of magneto-acoustic waves into umbral flashes. Following the application of modern inversion routines, we find evidence to support the scenario that umbral shock events cause expansion of the embedded magnetic field lines due to the increased adiabatic pressure. The large number statistics employed allow us to calculate the adiabatic index, gamma = 1.12 +/- 0.01, for chromospheric umbral locations. Examination of the vector magnetic field fluctuations perpendicular to the solar normal revealed changes up to ~200 G at the locations of umbral flashes. Such transversal magnetic field fluctuations have not been described before. Through comparisons with non-linear force-free field extrapolations, we find that the perturbations of the transverse field components are orientated in the same direction as the quiescent field geometries. This implies that magnetic field enhancements produced by umbral flashes are directed along the motion path of the developing shock, hence producing relatively small changes, up to a maximum of ~8 degrees, in the inclination and/or azimuthal directions of the magnetic field. Importantly, this work highlights that umbral flashes are able to modify the full vector magnetic field, with the detection of the weaker transverse magnetic field components made possible by high-resolution data combined with modern inversion routines.
  • The Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) provides continuum images and magnetograms with a cadence better than one per minute. It has been continuously observing the Sun 24 hours a day for the past 7 years. The obvious trade-off between full disk observations and spatial resolution makes HMI not enough to analyze the smallest-scale events in the solar atmosphere. Our aim is to develop a new method to enhance HMI data, simultaneously deconvolving and super-resolving images and magnetograms. The resulting images will mimic observations with a diffraction-limited telescope twice the diameter of HMI. Our method, which we call Enhance, is based on two deep fully convolutional neural networks that input patches of HMI observations and output deconvolved and super-resolved data. The neural networks are trained on synthetic data obtained from simulations of the emergence of solar active regions. We have obtained deconvolved and supper-resolved HMI images. To solve this ill-defined problem with infinite solutions we have used a neural network approach to add prior information from the simulations. We test Enhance against Hinode data that has been degraded to a 28 cm diameter telescope showing very good consistency. The code is open source.
  • Tabetha S. Boyajian, Roi Alonso, Alex Ammerman, David Armstrong, A. Asensio Ramos, K. Barkaoui, Thomas G. Beatty, Z. Benkhaldoun, Paul Benni, Rory Bentley, Andrei Berdyugin, Svetlana Berdyugina, Serge Bergeron, Allyson Bieryla, Michaela G. Blain, Alicia Capetillo Blanco, Eva H. L. Bodman, Anne Boucher, Mark Bradley, Stephen M. Brincat, Thomas G. Brink, John Briol, David J. A. Brown, J.Budaj, A. Burdanov, B. Cale, Miguel Aznar Carbo, R. Castillo Garcia, Wendy J Clark, Geoffrey C. Clayton, James L. Clem, Phillip H Coker, Evan M. Cook, Chris M. Copperwheat, J. Curtis, R. M. Cutri, B. Cseh, C. H. Cynamon, Alex J. Daniels, James R. A. Davenport, Hans J. Deeg, Roberto De Lorenzo, Thomas De Jaeger, Jean-Bruno Desrosiers, John Dolan, D. J. Dowhos, Franky Dubois, R. Durkee, Shawn Dvorak, Lynn Easley, N. Edwards, Tyler G. Ellis, Emery Erdelyi, Steve Ertel, Rafael. G. Farfán, J. Farihi, Alexei V. Filippenko, Emma Foxell, Davide Gandolfi, Faustino Garcia, F. Giddens, M. Gillon, Juan-Luis González-Carballo, C. González-Fernández, J. I. González Hernández, Keith A. Graham, Kenton A. Greene, J. Gregorio, Na'ama Hallakoun, Ottó Hanyecz, G. R. Harp, Gregory W. Henry, E. Herrero, Caleb F. Hildbold, D. Hinzel, G. Holgado, Bernadett Ignácz, Valentin D. Ivanov, E. Jehin, Helen E. Jermak, Steve Johnston, S. Kafka, Csilla Kalup, Emmanuel Kardasis, Shai Kaspi, Grant M. Kennedy, F. Kiefer, C. L. Kielty, Dennis Kessler, H. Kiiskinen, T. L. Killestein, Ronald A. King, V. Kollar, H. Korhonen, C. Kotnik, Réka Könyves-Tóth, Levente Kriskovics, Nathan Krumm, Vadim Krushinsky, E. Kundra, Francois-Rene Lachapelle, D. Lacourse, P. Lake, Kristine Lam, Gavin P. Lamb, Dave Lane, Marie Wingyee Lau, Pablo Lewin, Chris Lintott, Carey Lisse, Ludwig Logie, Nicolas Longeard, M. Lopez Villanueva, E. Whit Ludington, A. Mainzer, Lison Malo, Chris Maloney, A. Mann, A. Mantero, Massimo Marengo, Jon Marchant, M. J. Martinez González, Joseph R. Masiero, Jon C. Mauerhan, James Mccormac, Aaron Mcneely, Huan Y. A. Meng, Mike Miller, Lawrence A. Molnar, J. C. Morales, Brett M. Morris, Matthew W. Muterspaugh, David Nespral, C. R. Nugent, Katherine M. Nugent, A. Odasso, Derek O'keeffe, A. Oksanen, John M. O'meara, András Ordasi, Hugh Osborn, John J. Ott, J. R. Parks, Diego Rodriguez Perez, Vance Petriew, R. Pickard, András Pál, P. Plavchan, C. Westendorp Plaza, Don Pollacco, F. Pozo Nuñez, F. J. Pozuelos, Steve Rau, Seth Redfield, Howard Relles, I. Ribas, Jon Richards, Joonas L. O. Saario, Emily J. Safron, J. Martin Sallai, Krisztián Sárneczky, Bradley E. Schaefer, Clea F. Schumer, Madison Schwartzendruber, Michael H. Siegel, Andrew P. V. Siemion, Brooke D. Simmons, Joshua D. Simon, S. Simón-Diaz, Michael L. Sitko, Hector Socas-Navarro, Á. Sódor, Donn Starkey, Iain A. Steele, Geoff Stone, R.A. Street, Tricia Sullivan, J. Suomela, J. J. Swift, Gyula M. Szabó, Róbert Szabó, Róbert Szakáts, Tamás Szalai, Angelle M. Tanner, B. Toledo-Padrón, Tamás Tordai, Amaury H.M.J. Triaud, Jake D. Turner, Joseph H. Ulowetz, Marian Urbanik, Siegfried Vanaverbeke, Andrew Vanderburg, Krisztián Vida, Brad P. Vietje, József Vinkó, K. Von Braun, Elizabeth O. Waagen, Dan Walsh, Christopher A. Watson, R.C. Weir, Klaus Wenzel, Michael W. Williamson, Jason T. Wright, M. C. Wyatt, Weikang Zheng, Gabriella Zsidi
    Jan. 2, 2018 astro-ph.SR, astro-ph.EP
    We present a photometric detection of the first brightness dips of the unique variable star KIC 8462852 since the end of the Kepler space mission in 2013 May. Our regular photometric surveillance started in October 2015, and a sequence of dipping began in 2017 May continuing on through the end of 2017, when the star was no longer visible from Earth. We distinguish four main 1-2.5% dips, named "Elsie," "Celeste," "Skara Brae," and "Angkor", which persist on timescales from several days to weeks. Our main results so far are: (i) there are no apparent changes of the stellar spectrum or polarization during the dips; (ii) the multiband photometry of the dips shows differential reddening favoring non-grey extinction. Therefore, our data are inconsistent with dip models that invoke optically thick material, but rather they are in-line with predictions for an occulter consisting primarily of ordinary dust, where much of the material must be optically thin with a size scale <<1um, and may also be consistent with models invoking variations intrinsic to the stellar photosphere. Notably, our data do not place constraints on the color of the longer-term "secular" dimming, which may be caused by independent processes, or probe different regimes of a single process.
  • We investigate the properties of a sunspot light-bridge, focusing on the changes produced by the impact of a plasma blob ejected from a C-class flare. We observed a sunspot in active region NOAA 12544 using spectropolarimetric raster maps of the four Fe I lines around 15655 \AA\ with the GREGOR Infrared Spectrograph (GRIS), narrow-band intensity images sampling the Fe I 6173 \AA\ line with the GREGOR Fabry-P\'erot Interferometer (GFPI), and intensity broad band images in G-band and Ca II H band with the High-resolution Fast Imager (HiFI). All these instruments are located at the GREGOR telescope at the Observatorio del Teide, Tenerife, Spain. The data cover the time before, during, and after the flare event. The analysis is complemented with Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) and Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) data from the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). The physical parameters of the atmosphere at differents heights were inferred using spectral-line inversion techniques. We identify photospheric and chromospheric brightenings, heating events, and changes in the Stokes profiles associated to the flare eruption and the subsequent arrival of the plasma blob to the light bridge, after traveling along an active region loop. The measurements suggest that these phenomena are the result of reconnection events driven by the interaction of the plasma blob with the magnetic field topology of the light bridge.
  • $Context$. The thermal structure of the penumbra below its visible surface (i.e., $\tau_5 \ge 1$) has important implications for our present understanding of sunspots and their penumbrae: their brightness and energy transport, mode conversion of magneto-acoustic waves, sunspot seismology, and so forth. $Aims$. We aim at determining the thermal stratification in the layers immediately beneath the visible surface of the penumbra: $\tau_5 \in [1,3]$ ($\approx 70-80$ km below the visible continuum-forming layer). $Methods$. We analyzed spectropolarimetric data (i.e., Stokes profiles) in three Fe \textsc{i} lines located at 1565 nm observed with the GRIS instrument attached to the 1.5-meter solar telescope GREGOR. The data are corrected for the smearing effects of wide-angle scattered light and then subjected to an inversion code for the radiative transfer equation in order to retrieve, among others, the temperature as a function of optical depth $T(\tau_5)$. $Results$. We find that the temperature gradient below the visible surface of the penumbra is smaller than in the quiet Sun. This implies that in the region $\tau_5 \ge 1$ the penumbral temperature diverges from that of the quiet Sun. The same result is obtained when focusing only on the thermal structure below the surface of bright penumbral filaments. We interpret these results as evidence of a thick penumbra, whereby the magnetopause is not located near its visible surface. In addition, we find that the temperature gradient in bright penumbral filaments is lower than in granules. This can be explained in terms of the limited expansion of a hot upflow inside a penumbral filament relative to a granular upflow, as magnetic pressure and tension forces from the surrounding penumbral magnetic field hinder an expansion like this.
  • There is a thin transition region (TR) in the solar atmosphere where the temperature rises from 10,000 K in the chromosphere to millions of degrees in the corona. Little is known about the mechanisms that dominate this enigmatic region other than the magnetic field plays a key role. The magnetism of the TR can only be detected by polarimetric measurements of a few ultraviolet (UV) spectral lines, the Lyman-$\alpha$ line of neutral hydrogen at 121.6 nm (the strongest line of the solar UV spectrum) being of particular interest given its sensitivity to the Hanle effect (the magnetic-field-induced modification of the scattering line polarization). We report the discovery of linear polarization produced by scattering processes in the Lyman-$\alpha$ line, obtained with the Chromospheric Lyman-Alpha Spectro-Polarimeter (CLASP) rocket experiment. The Stokes profiles observed by CLASP in quiet regions of the solar disk show that the $Q/I$ and $U/I$ linear polarization signals are of the order of 0.1 % in the line core and up to a few percent in the nearby wings, and that both have conspicuous spatial variations with scales of $\sim 10$ arcsec. These observations help constrain theoretical models of the chromosphere-corona TR and extrapolations of the magnetic field from photospheric magnetograms. In fact, the observed spatial variation from disk to limb of polarization at the line core and wings already challenge the predictions from three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamical models of the upper solar chromosphere.
  • We present mid-infrared (MIR, 7.5-13.5 $\mu$m) imaging and spectroscopy observations obtained with the CanariCam (CC) instrument on the 10.4m Gran Telescopio CANARIAS for a sample of 20 nearby, MIR bright and X-ray luminous QSOs. We find that for the majority of QSOs the MIR emission is unresolved at angular scales nearly 0.3 arcsec, corresponding to physical scales $<600$ pc. We find that the higher-spatial resolution CC spectra have similar shapes to those obtained with Spitzer/IRS, and hence we can assume that the spectra are not heavily contaminated by extended emission in the host galaxy. We thus take advantage of the higher signal to noise Spitzer/IRS spectra, as a fair representation of the nuclear emission, to decompose it into a combination of active galactic nuclei (AGN), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) and stellar components. In most cases the AGN is the dominant component, with a median contribution of 85 per cent of the continuum light at MIR (5-15 $\mu$m) within the IRS slit. This IR AGN emission is well reproduced by clumpy torus models. We find evidence for significant differences in the parameters that describe the dusty tori of QSOs when compared with the same parameters of Seyfert 1 and 2 nuclei. In particular, we find a lower number of clouds ($N_{0}<12$), steeper radial distribution of clouds ($q=1.5-3.0$), and clouds that are less optically thick ($\tau_{V}<100$) than in Seyfert 1, which could be attributed to dusty structures that have been partially evaporated and piled up by the higher radiation field in QSOs. We find that the combination of the angular width $\sigma_{torus}$, viewing angle $i$, and number of clouds along the equatorial line $N_{0}$, produces large escape probabilities ($P_{esc} > 2$ per cent) and low geometrical covering factors ($f_{2}<0.6$), as expected for AGN with broad lines in their optical spectra.
  • The purpose of this work is to better understand the confidence limits of the photospheric solar oxygen abundance derived from three-dimensional models using the forbidden [OI] line at 6300 \AA , including correlations with other parameters involved. We worked with a three-dimensional empirical model and two solar intensity atlases. We employed Bayesian inference as a tool to determine the most probable value for the solar oxygen abundance given the model chosen. We considered a number of error sources, such as uncertainties in the continuum derivation, in the wavelength calibration and in the abundance/strength of Ni. Our results shows correlations between the effects of several parameters employed in the derivation. The Bayesian analysis provides robust confidence limits taking into account all of these factors in a rigorous manner. We obtain that, given the empirical three-dimensional model and the atlas observations employed here, the most probable value for the solar oxygen abundance is $\log(\epsilon_O) = 8.86\pm0.04$. However, we note that this uncertainty does not consider possible sources of systematic errors due to the model choice.
  • Solar chromospheric fibrils, as observed in the core of strong chromospheric spectral lines, extend from photospheric field concentrations suggesting that they trace magnetic field lines. These images have been historically used as proxies of magnetic fields for many purposes. We use a Bayesian hierarchical model to analyze several tens of thousands of pixels in spectro-polarimetric chromospheric images of penumbrae and chromospheric fibrils. We compare the alignment between the field azimuth inferred from the linear polarization signals through the transverse Zeeman effect and the direction of the fibrils in the image. We conclude that, in the analyzed fields of view, fibrils are often well aligned with the magnetic field azimuth. Despite this alignment, the analysis also shows that there is a non-negligible dispersion. In penumbral filaments, we find a dispersion with a standard deviation of ~16 degrees, while this dispersion goes up to ~34 degrees in less magnetized regions.
  • Active regions are the most prominent manifestations of solar magnetic fields; their generation and dissipation are fundamental problems in solar physics. Light bridges are commonly present during sunspot decay, but a comprehensive picture of their role in the removal of photospheric magnetic field is still missing. We study the three dimensional configuration of a sunspot and in particular its light bridge during one of the last stages of its decay. We present the magnetic and thermodynamical stratification inferred from full Stokes inversions of the photospheric Si I 10827 \AA\ and Ca I 10839 \AA\ lines obtained with the GREGOR Infrared Spectrograph of the GREGOR telescope at Observatorio del Teide, Tenerife, Spain. The analysis is complemented by a study of continuum images covering the disk passage of the active region, which are provided by the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory. The sunspot shows a light bridge with penumbral continuum intensity that separates the central umbra from a smaller umbra. We find that in this region the magnetic field lines form a canopy with lower magnetic field strength in the inner part. The photospheric light bridge is dominated by gas pressure (high-$\beta$), as opposed to the surrounding umbra where the magnetic pressure is higher. A convective flow is observed in the light bridge. This flow is able to bend the magnetic field lines and to produce field reversals. The field lines close above the light bridge and become as vertical and strong as in the surrounding umbra. We conclude that it develops because of two highly magnetized regions which come closer during the sunspot evolution.
  • Context. Investigations of the magnetism of the quiet Sun are hindered by extremely weak polarization signals in Fraunhofer spectral lines. Photon noise, straylight, and the systematically different sensitivity of the Zeeman effect to longitudinal and transversal magnetic fields result in controversial results in terms of the strength and angular distribution of the magnetic field vector. Aims. The information content of Stokes measurements close to the diffraction limit of the 1.5 m GREGOR telescope is analyzed. We took the effects of spatial straylight and photon noise into account. Methods. Highly sensitive full Stokes measurements of a quiet-Sun region at disk center in the deep photospheric Fe I lines in the 1.56 {\mu}m region were obtained with the infrared spectropolarimeter GRIS at the GREGOR telescope. Noise statistics and Stokes V asymmetries were analyzed and compared to a similar data set of the Hinode spectropolarimeter (SOT/SP). Simple diagnostics based directly on the shape and strength of the profiles were applied to the GRIS data. We made use of the magnetic line ratio technique, which was tested against MHD simulations. Results. About 80% of the GRIS spectra of a very quiet solar region show polarimetric signals above a 3{\sigma} level. Area and amplitude asymmetries agree well with small-scale surface dynamo MHD simulations. The magnetic line ratio analysis reveals ubiquitous magnetic regions in the ten to hundred Gauss range with some concentrations of kilo-Gauss fields. Conclusions. The GRIS spectropolarimetric data at a spatial resolution of 0.40" are so far unique in the combination of high spatial resolution scans and high magnetic field sensitivity. Nevertheless, the unavoidable effect of spatial straylight and the resulting dilution of the weak Stokes profiles means that inversion techniques still bear a high risk of misinterpretating the data.
  • Stellar prominences detected in rapidly rotating stars serve as probes of the magnetism in the corona of cool stars. We have synthesized the temporal evolution of the Stokes profiles generated in the He I 10830 and 5876 A triplets during the rotation of a prominence around a star. The synthesis was performed with the HAZEL code using a cloud model in which the prominence is characterized by a slab located at a fixed latitude and height. It accounts for the scattering polarization and Zeeman and Hanle effects. Several cases with different prominence magnetic field strengths and orientations have been analyzed. The results show an emission feature that drifts across the profile while the prominence is out of the stellar disk. When the prominence eclipses the star, the intensity profile shows an absorption. The scattering induced by the prominence generates linear polarization signals in Stokes Q and U profiles, which are modified by the Hanle effect when a magnetic field is present. Due to the Zeeman effect, Stokes V profiles show a signal with very low amplitude when the magnetic field along the line-of-sight is different from zero. The estimated linear polarization signals could potentially be detected with the future spectropolarimeter MIRADAS, to be attached to GTC telescope.
  • Some models for the topology of the magnetic field in sunspot penumbrae predict the existence of field-free or dynamically weak-field regions in the deep Photosphere. To confirm or rule out the existence of weak-field regions in the deepest photospheric layers of the penumbra. The magnetic field at $\log\tau_5=0$ is investigated by means of inversions of spectropolarimetric data of two different sunspots located very close to disk center with a spatial resolution of approximately 0.4-0.45 arcsec. The data have been recorded using the GRIS instrument attached to the 1.5-meters GREGOR solar telescope at El Teide observatory. It includes three Fe I lines around 1565 nm, whose sensitivity to the magnetic field peaks at half a pressure-scale-height deeper than the sensitivity of the widely used Fe I spectral line pair at 630 nm. Prior to the inversion, the data is corrected for the effects of scattered light using a deconvolution method with several point spread functions. At $\log\tau_5=0$ we find no evidence for the existence of regions with dynamically weak ($B<500$ Gauss) magnetic fields in sunspot penumbrae. This result is much more reliable than previous investigations done with Fe I lines at 630 nm. Moreover, the result is independent of the number of nodes employed in the inversion, and also independent of the point spread function used to deconvolve the data, and does not depend on the amount of straylight (i.e. wide-angle scattered light) considered.
  • The origin of the unification model for Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) was the detection of broad hydrogen recombination lines in the optical polarized spectrum of the Seyfert 2 galaxy (Sy2) NGC 1068. Since then, a search for the hidden broad-line region (HBLR) of nearby Sy2s started, but polarized broad lines have only been detected in 30-40% of the nearby Sy2s observed to date. Here we present new VLT/FORS2 optical spectropolarimetry of a sample of 15 Sy2s, including Compton-thin and Compton-thick sources. The sample includes six galaxies without previously published spectropolarimetry, some of them normally treated as non-hidden BLR (NHBLR) objects in the literature, four classified as NHBLR, and five as HBLR based on previous data. We report >=4{\sigma} detections of a HBLR in 11 of these galaxies (73% of the sample) and a tentative detection in NGC 5793, which is Compton-thick according to the analysis of X-ray data performed here. Our results confirm that at least some NHBLRs are misclassified, bringing previous publications reporting differences between HBLR and NHBLR objects into question. We detect broad H{\alpha} and H{\beta} components in polarized light for 10 targets, and just broad H{\alpha} for NGC 5793 and NGC 6300, with line widths ranging between 2100 and 9600 km/s. High bolometric luminosities and low column densities are associated with higher polarization degrees, but not necessarily with the detection of the scattered broad components.
  • Solar tornadoes are dark vertical filamentary structures observed in the extreme ultraviolet associated with prominence legs and filament barbs. Their true nature and relationship to prominences requires understanding their magnetic structure and dynamic properties. Recently, a controversy has arisen: is the magnetic field organized forming vertical, helical structures or is it dominantly horizontal? And concerning their dynamics, are tornadoes really rotating or is it just a visual illusion? Here, we analyze four consecutive spectropolarimetric scans of a prominence hosting tornadoes on its legs which help us shed some light on their magnetic and dynamical properties. We show that the magnetic field is very smooth in all the prominence, probably an intrinsic property of the coronal field. The prominence legs have vertical helical fields that show slow temporal variation probably related to the motion of the fibrils. Concerning the dynamics, we argue that 1) if rotation exists, it is intermittent, lasting no more than one hour, and 2) the observed velocity pattern is also consistent with an oscillatory velocity pattern (waves).
  • Polar faculae are bright features that can be detected in solar limb observations and they are related to magnetic field concentrations. Although there is a large number of works studying them, some questions about their nature as their magnetic properties at different heights are still open. Thus, we aim to improve the understanding of solar polar faculae. In that sense, we infer the vertical stratification of the temperature, gas pressure, line of sight velocity and magnetic field vector of polar faculae regions. We performed inversions of the Stokes profiles observed with Hinode/SP after removing the stray light contamination produced by the spatial point spread function of the telescope. Moreover, after solving the azimuth ambiguity, we transform the magnetic field vector to local solar coordinates. The obtained results reveal that the polar faculae are constituted by hot plasma with low line of sight velocities and single polarity magnetic fields in the kilogauss range that are nearly perpendicular to the solar surface. We also found that the spatial location of these magnetic fields is slightly shifted respect to the continuum observations towards the disc centre. We believe that this is due to the hot wall effect that allows detecting photons that come from deeper layers located closer to the solar limb.
  • Quantitative thermodynamical, dynamical and magnetic properties of the solar and stellar plasmas are obtained by interpreting their emergent non-polarized and polarized spectrum. This inference requires the selection of a set of spectral lines particularly sensitive to the physical conditions in the plasma and a suitable parametric model of the solar/stellar atmosphere. Nonlinear inversion codes are then used to fit the model to the observations. However, the presence of systematic effects like nearby or blended spectral lines, telluric absorption or incorrect correction of the continuum, among others, can strongly affect the results. We present an extension to current inversion codes that can deal with these effects in a transparent way. The resulting algorithm is very simple and can be applied to any existing inversion code with the addition of a few lines of code as an extra step in each iteration.
  • Recent spectropolarimetric observations of active region filaments have revealed polarization profiles with signatures typical of the strong field Zeeman regime. The conspicuous absence in those observations of scattering polarization and Hanle effect signatures was then pointed out by some authors. This was interpreted either as a signature of mixed "turbulent" field components or as a result of optical thickness. In this article, we present a natural scenario to explain these Zeeman-only spectro-polarimetric observations of active region filaments. We propose a two-component model, one on top of the other. Both components have horizontal fields, the azimuth difference between them being close to 90 degrees. The component that lies lower in the atmosphere is permeated by a strong field of the order of 600 G, while the upper component has much weaker fields, of the order of 10 G. The ensuing scattering polarization signatures of the individual components have opposite signs, so that its combination along the line of sight reduces --and even can cancel out-- the Hanle signatures, giving rise to an apparent only-Zeeman profile. This model is also applicable to other chromospheric structures seen in absorption above active regions.
  • We present the distributions of geometrical covering factors of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) dusty tori (f2) using an X-ray selected complete sample of 227 AGN drawn from the Bright Ultra-hard XMM-Newton Survey. The AGN have z from 0.05 to 1.7, 2-10 keV luminosities between 10^42 and 10^46 erg/s and Compton-thin X-ray absorption. Employing data from UKIDSS, 2MASS and the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer in a previous work we determined the rest-frame 1-20 microns continuum emission from the torus which we model here with the clumpy torus models of Nenkova et al. Optically classified type 1 and type 2 AGN are intrinsically different, with type 2 AGN having on average tori with higher f2 than type 1 AGN. Nevertheless, ~20 per cent of type 1 AGN have tori with large covering factors while ~23-28 per cent of type 2 AGN have tori with small covering factors. Low f2 are preferred at high AGN luminosities, as postulated by simple receding torus models, although for type 2 AGN the effect is certainly small. f2 increases with the X-ray column density, which implies that dust extinction an X-ray absorption takes place in material that shares an overall geometry and most likely belongs to the same structure, the putative torus. Based on our results, the viewing angle, AGN luminosity and also f2 determine the optical appearance of an AGN and control the shape of the rest-frame ~1-20 microns nuclear continuum emission. Thus, the torus geometrical covering factor is a key ingredient of unification schemes.
  • We show that it is possible to measure polarization with a polarimeter that gets rid of the seeing while still measuring at a frequency well below that of the seeing. We study a standard polarimeter made of two retarders and a beamsplitter. The retarders are modulated at $\sim 500$ Hz, a frequency comparable to that of the variations of the refraction index in the Earth atmosphere, what is usually termed as seeing in astronomical observations. However, we assume that the camera is slow, so that our measurements are time integrations of these modulated signals. In order to recover the time variation of the seeing and obtain the Stokes parameters, we use the theory of compressed sensing to solve the demodulation by impose a sparsity constraint on the Fourier coefficients of the seeing. We demonstrate the feasibility of this sub-Nyquist polarimeter using numerical simulations, both in the case without noise and with noise. We show that a sensible modulation scheme is obtained by randomly changing the fast axis of the modulators or their retardances in specific ways. We finally demonstrate that the value of the Stokes parameters can be recovered with great precision at almost maximum efficiency, although it slightly degrades when the signal-to-noise ratio of the observations increase, a consequence of the multiplexing under the presence of photon noise.
  • We present an analysis of the nuclear infrared (IR, 1.6 to 18 $\mu$m) emission of the ultraluminous IR galaxy UGC 5101 to derive the properties of its active galactic nucleus (AGN) and its obscuring material. We use new mid-IR high angular resolution ($0.3-0.5$ arcsec) imaging using the Si-2 filter ($\lambda_{C}=8.7\, \mu$m) and $7.5-13$ $\mu$m spectroscopy taken with CanariCam (CC) on the 10.4m Gran Telescopio CANARIAS. We also use archival HST/NICMOS and Subaru/COMICS imaging and Spitzer/IRS spectroscopy. We estimate the near- and mid-IR unresolved nuclear emission by modelling the imaging data with GALFIT. We decompose the Spitzer/IRS and CC spectra using a power-law component, which represents the emission due to dust heated by the AGN, and a starburst component, both affected by foreground extinction. We model the resulting unresolved near- and mid-IR, and the starburst subtracted CC spectrum with the CLUMPY torus models of Nenkova et al. The derived geometrical properties of the torus, including the large covering factor and the high foreground extinction needed to reproduce the deep $9.7\, \mu$m silicate feature, are consistent with the lack of strong AGN signatures in the optical. We derive an AGN bolometric luminosity $L_{bol}\sim1.9\times10^{45}\,$erg s$^{-1}$ that is in good agreement with other estimates in the literature.
  • The spatial variation of physical quantities, such as the mass density, across solar atmospheric waveguides governs the timescales and spatial scales for wave damping and energy dissipation. The direct measurement of the spatial distribution of density, however, is difficult and indirect seismology inversion methods have been suggested as an alternative. We applied Bayesian inference, model comparison, and model-averaging techniques to the inference of the cross-field density structuring in solar magnetic waveguides using information on periods and damping times for resonantly damped magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) transverse kink oscillations. Three commonly employed alternative profiles were used to model the variation of the mass density across the waveguide boundary. Parameter inference enabled us to obtain information on physical quantities such as the Alfv\'en travel time, the density contrast, and the transverse inhomogeneity length scale. The inference results from alternative density models were compared and their differences quantified. Then, the relative plausibility of the considered models was assessed by performing model comparison. Our results indicate that the evidence in favor of any of the three models is minimal, unless the oscillations are strongly damped. In such a circumstance, the application of model-averaging techniques enables the computation of an evidence-weighted inference that takes into account the plausibility of each model in the calculation of a combined inversion for the unknown physical parameters.
  • Observations of the Sun from the Earth are always limited by the presence of the atmosphere, which strongly disturbs the images. A solution to this problem is to place the telescopes in space satellites, which produce observations without any (or limited) atmospheric aberrations. However, even though the images from space are not affected by atmospheric seeing, the optical properties of the instruments still limit the observations. In the case of diffraction limited observations, the PSF establishes the maximum allowed spatial resolution, defined as the distance between two nearby structures that can be properly distinguished. In addition, the shape of the PSF induce a dispersion of the light from different parts of the image, leading to what is commonly termed as stray light or dispersed light. This effect produces that light observed in a spatial location at the focal plane is a combination of the light emitted in the object at relatively distant spatial locations. We aim to correct the effect produced by the telescope's PSF using a deconvolution method, and we decided to apply the code on Hinode/SP quiet Sun observations. We analyze the validity of the deconvolution process with noisy data and we infer the physical properties of quiet Sun magnetic elements after the deconvolution process.
  • Proving the magnetic configuration of solar spicules has hitherto been difficult due to the lack of spatial resolution and image stability during off-limb ground-based observations. We report spectropolarimetric observations of spicules taken in the He I 1083 nm spectral region with the Tenerife Infrared Polarimeter II at the German Vacuum Tower Telescope of the Observatorio del Teide (Tenerife; Canary Islands; Spain). The data provide the variation with geometrical height of the Stokes I, Q, U, and V profiles whose encoded information allows the determination of the magnetic field vector by means of the HAZEL inversion code. The inferred results show that the average magnetic field strength at the base of solar spicules is about 80 gauss and then it decreases rapidly with height to about 30 gauss at a height of 3000 km above the visible solar surface. Moreover, the magnetic field vector is close to vertical at the base of the chromosphere and has mid inclinations (about 50 degree) above 2 Mm height.