• We report the low-temperature properties of phase-pure single crystals of the half-Heusler compound CuMnSb grown by means of optical float-zoning. The magnetization, specific heat, electrical resistivity, and Hall effect of our single crystals exhibit an antiferromagnetic transition at $T_{\mathrm{N}} = 55~\mathrm{K}$ and a second anomaly at a temperature $T^{*} \approx 34~\mathrm{K}$. Powder and single-crystal neutron diffraction establish an ordered magnetic moment of $(3.9\pm0.1)~\mu_{\mathrm{B}}/\mathrm{f.u.}$, consistent with the effective moment inferred from the Curie-Weiss dependence of the susceptibility. Below $T_{\mathrm{N}}$, the Mn sublattice displays commensurate type-II antiferromagnetic order with propagation vectors and magnetic moments along $\langle111\rangle$ (magnetic space group $R[I]3c$). Surprisingly, below $T^{*}$, the moments tilt away from $\langle111\rangle$ by a finite angle $\delta \approx 11^{\circ}$, forming a canted antiferromagnetic structure without uniform magnetization consistent with magnetic space group $C[B]c$. Our results establish that type-II antiferromagnetism is not the zero-temperature magnetic ground state of CuMnSb as may be expected of the face-centered cubic Mn sublattice.
  • Chiral magnets with topologically nontrivial spin order such as Skyrmions have generated enormous interest in both fundamental and applied sciences. We report broadband microwave spectroscopy performed on the insulating chiral ferrimagnet Cu$_{2}$OSeO$_{3}$. For the damping of magnetization dynamics we find a remarkably small Gilbert damping parameter of about $1\times10^{-4}$ at 5 K. This value is only a factor of 4 larger than the one reported for the best insulating ferrimagnet yttrium iron garnet. We detect a series of sharp resonances and attribute them to confined spin waves in the mm-sized samples. Considering the small damping, insulating chiral magnets turn out to be promising candidates when exploring non-collinear spin structures for high frequency applications.
  • Magnetic skyrmions are topologically protected whirls that decay through singular magnetic configurations known as Bloch points. We have used Lorentz transmission electron microscopy to infer the energetics associated with the topological decay of magnetic skyrmions far from equilibrium in the chiral magnet Fe$_{1-x}$Co$_x$Si. We observed that the life time $\tau$ of the skyrmions depends exponentially on temperature, $\tau \sim \tau_0 \, e^{\Delta E/k_B T}$. The prefactor $\tau_0$ of this Arrhenius law changes by more than 30 orders of magnitude for small changes of magnetic field reflecting a substantial reduction of the life time of skyrmions by entropic effects and thus an extreme case of enthalpy-entropy compensation. Such compensation effects, being well-known across many different scientific disciplines, affect topological transitions and thus topological protection on an unprecedented level.
  • Linear dichroism -- the polarization dependent absorption of electromagnetic waves -- is routinely exploited in applications as diverse as structure determination of DNA or polarization filters in optical technologies. Here filamentary absorbers with a large length-to-width ratio are a prerequisite. For magnetization dynamics in the few GHz frequency regime strictly linear dichroism was not observed for more than eight decades. Here, we show that the bulk chiral magnet Cu$_{2}$OSeO$_{3}$ exhibits linearly polarized magnetization dynamics at an unexpectedly small frequency of about 2 GHz. Unlike optical filters that are assembled from filamentary absorbers, the magnet provides linear polarization as a bulk material for an extremely wide range of length-to-width ratios. In addition, the polarization plane of a given mode can be switched by 90$^\circ$ via a tiny variation in width. Our findings shed a new light on magnetization dynamics in that ferrimagnetic ordering combined with anisotropic exchange interaction offers strictly linear polarization and cross-polarized modes for a broad spectrum of sample shapes. The discovery allows for novel design rules and optimization of microwave-to-magnon transduction in emerging microwave technologies.
  • The chiral magnet Cu$_{2}$OSeO$_{3}$ hosts a skyrmion lattice, that may be equivalently described as a superposition of plane waves or lattice of particle-like topological objects. A thermal gradient may break up the skyrmion lattice and induce rotating domains raising the question which of these scenarios better describes the violent dynamics at the domain boundaries. Here we show that in an inhomogeneous temperature gradient caused by illumination in a Lorentz Transmission Electron Microscope different parts of the skyrmion lattice can be set into motion with different angular velocities. Tracking the time dependence we show that the constant rearrangement of domain walls is governed by dynamic 5-7 defects arranging into lines. An analysis of the associated defect density is described by Frank's equation and agrees well with classical 2D-Monte Carlo simulations. Fluctuations of boundaries show surge-like rearrangement of skyrmion clusters driven by defect rearrangement consistent with simulations treating skyrmions as point particles. Our findings underline the particle character of the skyrmion.
  • Nanoscale chiral skyrmions in noncentrosymmetric helimagnets are promising binary state variables in high-density, low-energy nonvolatile memory. Skyrmions are ubiquitous as an ordered, single-domain lattice phase, which makes it difficult to write information unless they are spatially broken up into smaller units, each representing a bit. Thus, the formation and manipulation of skyrmion lattice domains is a prerequisite for memory applications. Here, using an imaging technique based on resonant magnetic x-ray diffraction, we demonstrate the mapping and manipulation of skyrmion lattice domains in Cu2OSeO3. The material is particularly interesting for applications owing to its insulating nature, allowing for electric field-driven domain manipulation.
  • We report a study of the reorientation of the helimagnetic order in the archetypal cubic chiral magnet MnSi as a function of magnetic field direction. The reorientation process as inferred from small-angle neutron scattering, the magnetization, and the ac susceptibility is in excellent agreement with an effective mean-field theory taking into account the precise symmetries of the crystallographic space group. Depending on the field and temperature history and the direction of the field with respect to the crystalline axes, the helix reorientation may exhibit a crossover, a first-order, or a second-order transition. The magnetization and ac susceptibility provide evidence that the reorientation of helimagnetic domains is associated with large relaxation times exceeding seconds. At the second-order transitions residual Ising symmetries are spontaneously broken at continuous elastic instabilities of the helimagnetic order. In addition, on the time scales explored in our experiments these transitions are hysteretic as a function of field suggesting, within the same theoretical framework, the formation of an abundance of plastic deformations of the helical spin order. These deformations comprise topologically non-trivial disclinations, promising novel routes to spintronics applications alongside skyrmions discovered recently in the same class of materials.
  • We report the development of a versatile material preparation chain for intermetallic compounds that focuses on the realization of a high-purity growth environment. The preparation chain comprises of an argon glovebox, an inductively heated horizontal cold boat furnace, an arc melting furnace, an inductively heated rod casting furnace, an optically heated floating-zone furnace, a resistively heated annealing furnace, and an inductively heated annealing furnace. The cold boat furnace and the arc melting furnace may be loaded from the glovebox by means of a load-lock permitting to synthesize compounds starting with air-sensitive elements while handling the constituents exclusively in an inert gas atmosphere. All furnaces are all-metal sealed, bakeable, and may be pumped to ultra-high vacuum. We find that the latter represents an important prerequisite for handling compounds with high vapor pressure under high-purity argon atmosphere. We illustrate operational aspects of the preparation chain in terms of the single-crystal growth of the heavy-fermion compound CeNi2Ge2.
  • We report a kinetic small angle neutron scattering study of the skyrmion lattice (SL) in MnSi. Induced by an oscillatory tilting of the magnetic field direction, the elasticity and relaxation of the SL along the magnetic field direction have been measured with microsecond resolution. For the excitation frequency of 325 Hz the SL begins to track the tilting motion of the applied magnetic field under tilting angles exceeding $\alpha_c$ > 0.4{\deg}. Empirically the associated angular velocity of the tilting connects quantitatively with the critical charge carrier velocity of approx. 0.1mm/s under current driven spin transfer torques, for which the SL unpins. In addition, a pronounced temperature dependence of the skyrmion motion is attributed to the variation of the skyrmion stiffness. Taken together our study highlights the power of kinetic small angle neutron scattering as a new experimental tool to explore, in a rather general manner, the elasticity and impurity pinning of magnetic textures across a wide parameter space without parasitic signal interferences due to ohmic heating or Oersted magnetic fields.
  • Magnetic skyrmions in chiral magnets are nanoscale, topologically-protected magnetization swirls that are promising candidates for spintronics memory carriers. Therefore, observing and manipulating the skyrmion state on the surface level of the materials are of great importance for future applications. Here, we report a controlled way of creating a multidomain skyrmion state near the surface of a Cu$_{2}$OSeO$_{3}$ single crystal, observed by soft resonant elastic x-ray scattering. This technique is an ideal tool to probe the magnetic order at the $L_{3}$ edge of $3d$ metal compounds giving a depth sensitivity of ${\sim}50$ nm. The single-domain sixfold-symmetric skyrmion lattice can be broken up into domains overcoming the propagation directions imposed by the cubic anisotropy by applying the magnetic field in directions deviating from the major cubic axes. Our findings open the door to a new way to manipulate and engineer the skyrmion state locally on the surface, or on the level of individual skyrmions, which will enable applications in the future.
  • We report the study of the skyrmion state near the surface of Cu$_2$OSeO$_3$ using soft resonant elastic x-ray scattering (REXS) at the Cu $L_3$ edge. Within the lateral sampling area of $200 \times 200$ $\mu$m$^2$, we found a long-range-ordered skyrmion lattice phase as well as the formation of skyrmion domains via the multiple splitting of the diffraction spots. In a recent REXS study of the skyrmion phase of Cu$_2$OSeO$_3$ [Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 167202 (2014)], Langner et al. reported the observation of the unexpected existence of two distinct skyrmion sublattices that arise from inequivalent Cu sites, and that the rotation and superposition of the two periodic structures leads to a moir\'{e} pattern. However, we find no energy splitting of the Cu peak in x-ray absorption measurements and, instead, discuss alternative origins of the peak splitting. In particular, we find that for magnetic field directions deviating from the major cubic axes, a multidomain skyrmion lattice state is obtained, which consistently explains the splitting of the magnetic spots into two - and more - peaks.
  • We report single crystal growth of the series of CeTAl$_3$ compounds with T = Cu, Ag, Au, Pd and Pt by means of optical float zoning. High crystalline quality was confirmed in a thorough characterization process. With the exception of CeAgAl$_3$, all compounds crystallize in the non-centrosymmetric tetragonal BaNiSn$_{3}$ structure (space group: I4mm, No. 107), whereas CeAgAl$_3$ adopts the related orthorhombic PbSbO$_2$Cl structure (Cmcm, No. 63). An attempt to grow CeNiAl$_3$ resulted in the composition CeNi$_2$Al$_5$. Low temperature resistivity measurements down to $\sim$0.1K did not reveal evidence suggestive of magnetic order in CePtAl$_3$ and CePdAl$_3$. In contrast, CeAuAl$_3$, CeCuAl$_3$ and CeAgAl$_3$ display signatures of magnetic transitions at 1.3K, 2.1K and 3.2K, respectively. This is consistent with previous reports of antiferromagnetic order in CeAuAl$_3$, and CeCuAl$_3$ as well as ferromagnetism in CeAgAl$_3$, respectively.
  • The nature of dark matter, dark energy and large-scale gravity pose some of the most pressing questions in cosmology today. These fundamental questions require highly precise measurements, and a number of wide-field spectroscopic survey instruments are being designed to meet this requirement. A key component in these experiments is the development of a simulation tool to forecast science performance, define requirement flow-downs, optimize implementation, demonstrate feasibility, and prepare for exploitation. We present SPOKES (SPectrOscopic KEn Simulation), an end-to-end simulation facility for spectroscopic cosmological surveys designed to address this challenge. SPOKES is based on an integrated infrastructure, modular function organization, coherent data handling and fast data access. These key features allow reproducibility of pipeline runs, enable ease of use and provide flexibility to update functions within the pipeline. The cyclic nature of the pipeline offers the possibility to make the science output an efficient measure for design optimization and feasibility testing. We present the architecture, first science, and computational performance results of the simulation pipeline. The framework is general, but for the benchmark tests, we use the Dark Energy Spectrometer (DESpec), one of the early concepts for the upcoming project, the Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument (DESI). We discuss how the SPOKES framework enables a rigorous process to optimize and exploit spectroscopic survey experiments in order to derive high-precision cosmological measurements optimally.
  • We report comprehensive small angle neutron scattering (SANS) measurements complemented by ac susceptibility data of the helical order, conical phase and skyrmion lattice phase (SLP) in MnSi under uniaxial pressures. For all crystallographic orientations uniaxial pressure favours the phase for which a spatial modulation of the magnetization is closest to the pressure axis. Uniaxial pressures as low as 1kbar applied perpendicular to the magnetic field axis enhance the skyrmion lattice phase substantially, whereas the skyrmion lattice phase is suppressed for pressure parallel to the field. Taken together we present quantitative microscopic information how strain couples to magnetic order in the chiral magnet MnSi.
  • We combine Herschel/SPIRE sub-millimeter (submm) observations with existing multi-wavelength data to investigate the characteristics of low redshift, optically red galaxies detected in submm bands. We select a sample of galaxies in the redshift range 0.01$\leq$z$\leq$0.2, having >5$\sigma$ detections in the SPIRE 250 micron submm waveband. Sources are then divided into two sub-samples of $red$ and $blue$ galaxies, based on their UV-optical colours. Galaxies in the $red$ sample account for $\approx$4.2 per cent of the total number of sources with stellar masses M$_{*}\gtrsim$10$^{10}$ Solar-mass. Following visual classification of the $red$ galaxies, we find that $\gtrsim$30 per cent of them are early-type galaxies and $\gtrsim$40 per cent are spirals. The colour of the $red$-spiral galaxies could be the result of their highly inclined orientation and/or a strong contribution of the old stellar population. It is found that irrespective of their morphological types, $red$ and $blue$ sources occupy environments with more or less similar densities (i.e., the $\Sigma_5$ parameter). From the analysis of the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of galaxies in our samples based on MAGPHYS, we find that galaxies in the $red$ sample (of any morphological type) have dust masses similar to those in the $blue$ sample (i.e. normal spiral/star-forming systems). However, in comparison to the $red$-spirals and in particular $blue$ systems, $red$-ellipticals have lower mean dust-to-stellar mass ratios. Besides galaxies in the $red$-elliptical sample have much lower mean star-formation/specific-star-formation rates in contrast to their counterparts in the $blue$ sample. Our results support a scenario where dust in early-type systems is likely to be of an external origin.
  • A magnetic helix realizes a one-dimensional magnetic crystal with a period given by the pitch length $\lambda_h$. Its spin-wave excitations -- the helimagnons -- experience Bragg scattering off this periodicity leading to gaps in the spectrum that inhibit their propagation along the pitch direction. Using high-resolution inelastic neutron scattering the resulting band structure of helimagnons was resolved by preparing a single crystal of MnSi in a single magnetic-helix domain. At least five helimagnon bands could be identified that cover the crossover from flat bands at low energies with helimagnons basically localized along the pitch direction to dispersing bands at higher energies. In the low-energy limit, we find the helimagnon spectrum to be determined by a universal, parameter-free theory. Taking into account corrections to this low-energy theory, quantitative agreement is obtained in the entire energy range studied with the help of a single fitting parameter.
  • We present the catalogue of blended galaxy spectra from the Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey. These are cases where light from two galaxies are significantly detected in a single GAMA fibre. Galaxy pairs identified from their blended spectrum fall into two principal classes: they are either strong lenses, a passive galaxy lensing an emission-line galaxy; or occulting galaxies, serendipitous overlaps of two galaxies, of any type. Blended spectra can thus be used to reliably identify strong lenses for follow-up observations (high resolution imaging) and occulting pairs, especially those that are a late-type partly obscuring an early-type galaxy which are of interest for the study of dust content of spiral and irregular galaxies. The GAMA survey setup and its autoz automated redshift determination were used to identify candidate blended galaxy spectra from the cross-correlation peaks. We identify 280 blended spectra with a minimum velocity separation of 600 km/s, of which 104 are lens pair candidates, 71 emission-line-passive pairs, 78 are pairs of emission-line galaxies and and 27 are pairs of galaxies with passive spectra. We have visually inspected the candidates in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and Kilo Degree Survey (KiDS) images. Many blended objects are ellipticals with blue fuzz (Ef in our classification). These latter "Ef" classifications are candidates for possible strong lenses, massive ellipticals with an emission-line galaxy in one or more lensed images. The GAMA lens and occulting galaxy candidate samples are similar in size to those identified in the entire SDSS. This blended spectrum sample stands as a testament of the power of this highly complete, second-largest spectroscopic survey in existence and offers the possibility to expand e.g., strong gravitational lens surveys.
  • Motivated by recent experiments with ultra-cold quantum gases in optical lattices we study the decay of the staggered moment in the one-dimensional Fermi-Hubbard model starting from a perfect Neel state using exact diagonalization and the iTEBD method. This extends previous work in which the same problem has been addressed for pure spin Hamiltonians. As a main result, we show that the relaxation dynamics of the double occupancy and of the staggered moment are different. The former is controlled by the nearest-neighbor tunneling rate while the latter is much slower and strongly dependent on the interaction strength, indicating that spin excitations are important. This difference in characteristic energy scales for the fast charge dynamics and the much slower spin dynamics is also reflected in the real-time evolution of nearest-neighbor density and spin correlations. A very interesting time dependence emerges in the von Neumann entropy, which at short times increases linearly with a slope proportional to the tunneling matrix element while the long-time growth of entanglement is controlled by spin excitations. Our predictions for the different relaxation dynamics of the staggered moment and the double occupancy should be observable in state-of-the art optical lattice experiments. We further compare time averages of the double occupancy to both the expectation values in the canonical and diagonal ensemble, which quantitatively disagree with each other on finite systems. We relate the question of thermalization to the eigenstate thermalization hypothesis.
  • We explore the behaviour of [CII]-157.74um forbidden fine-structure line observed in a sample of 28 galaxies selected from ~50deg^2 of the H-ATLAS survey. The sample is restricted to galaxies with flux densities higher than S_160um>150mJy and optical spectra from the GAMA survey at 0.02<z<0.2. Far-IR spectra centred on this redshifted line were taken with the PACS instrument on-board the Herschel Space Observatory. The galaxies span 10<log(L_IR/Lo)<12 (where L_IR=L_IR[8-1000um]) and 7.3<log(L_[CII]/Lo)<9.3, covering a variety of optical galaxy morphologies. The sample exhibits the so-called [CII] deficit at high IR luminosities, i.e. L_[CII]/L_IR (hereafter [CII]/IR) decreases at high L_IR. We find significant differences between those galaxies presenting [CII]/IR>2.5x10^-3 with respect to those showing lower ratios. In particular, those with high ratios tend to have: (1) L_IR<10^11Lo; (2) cold dust temperatures, T_d<30K; (3) disk-like morphologies in r-band images; (4) a WISE colour 0.5<S_12um/S_22um<1.0; (5) low surface brightness Sigma_IR~10^8-9 Lo kpc^-2, (6) and specific star-formation rates of sSFR~0.05-3 Gyr^-1. We suggest that the strength of the far-UV radiation fields (<G_O>) is main parameter responsible for controlling the [CII]/IR ratio. It is possible that relatively high <G_O> creates a positively charged dust grain distribution, impeding an efficient photo-electric extraction of electrons from these grains to then collisionally excite carbon atoms. Within the brighter IR population, 11<log(L_IR/Lo)<12, the low [CII]/IR ratio is unlikely to be modified by [CII] self absorption or controlled by the presence of a moderately luminous AGN (identified via the BPT diagram).
  • We report an experimental and computational study of the Hall effect in Mn$_{\rm 1-x}$Fe$_{\rm x}$Si, as complemented by measurements in Mn$_{\rm 1-x}$Co$_{\rm x}$Si, when helimagnetic order is suppressed under substitutional doping. For small $x$ the anomalous Hall effect (AHE) and the topological Hall effect (THE) change sign. Under larger doping the AHE remains small and consistent with the magnetization, while the THE grows by over a factor of ten. Both the sign and the magnitude of the AHE and the THE are in excellent agreement with calculations based on density functional theory. Our study provides the long-sought material-specific microscopic justification, that while the AHE is due to the reciprocal-space Berry curvature, the THE originates in real-space Berry phases.
  • Fermi liquid theory provides a remarkably powerful framework for the description of the conduction electrons in metals and their ordering phenomena, such as superconductivity, ferromagnetism, and spin- and charge-density-wave order. A different class of ordering phenomena of great interest concerns spin configurations that are topologically protected, that is, their topology can be destroyed only by forcing the average magnetization locally to zero. Examples of such configurations are hedgehogs (points at which all spins are either pointing inwards or outwards) or vortices. A central question concerns the nature of the metallic state in the presence of such topologically distinct spin textures. Here we report a high-pressure study of the metallic state at the border of the skyrmion lattice in MnSi, which represents a new form of magnetic order composed of topologically non-trivial vortices. When long-range magnetic order is suppressed under pressure, the key characteristic of the skyrmion lattice - that is, the topological Hall signal due to the emergent magnetic flux associated with their topological winding - is unaffected in sign or magnitude and becomes an important characteristic of the metallic state. The regime of the topological Hall signal in temperature, pressure and magnetic field coincides thereby with the exceptionally extended regime of a pronounced non-Fermi-liquid resistivity. The observation of this topological Hall signal in the regime of the NFL resistivity suggests empirically that spin correlations with non-trivial topological character may drive a breakdown of Fermi liquid theory in pure metals.
  • We report detailed low temperature magnetotransport and magnetization measurements in MnSi under pressures up to $\sim12\,{\rm kbar}$. Tracking the role of sample quality, pressure transmitter, and field and temperature history allows us to link the emergence of a giant topological Hall resistivity $\sim50\,{\rm n\Omega cm}$ to the skyrmion lattice phase at ambient pressure. We show that the remarkably large size of the topological Hall resistivity in the zero-temperature limit must be generic. We discuss various mechanisms which can lead to the much smaller signal at elevated temperatures observed at ambient pressure.
  • The temperature and magnetic field dependence of lattice and carrier excitations in MnSi is studied in detail using inelastic light scattering. The pure symmetry components of the electronic response are derived from the polarization dependent spectra. The $E$ and $T_2$ responses agree by and large with longitudinal and optical transport data. However, an anomaly is observed right above the magnetic ordering temperature $T_{\rm C}=29\,{\rm K}$ that is associated with the fluctuations that drive the transition into the helimagnetic phase first order. The $T_1$ spectra, reflecting mostly chiral spin excitations, have a temperature dependence similar to that of the $E$ and $T_2$ symmetries. The response in the fully symmetric $A$ representation has a considerably weaker temperature dependence than that in the other symmetries. All nine Raman active phonon lines can be resolved at low temperature. The positions and line widths of the strongest four lines in $E$ and $T_2$ symmetry are analyzed in the temperature range $4<T<310\,{\rm K}$. Above $50\,{\rm K}$, the temperature dependence is found to be conventional and given by anharmonic phonon decay and the lattice expansion. Distinct anomalies are observed in the range of the helimagnetic transition and in the ordered phase. Applying a magnetic field of $4\,{\rm T}$, well above the critical field, removes all anomalies and restores a conventional behavior highlighting the relationship between the anomalies and magnetism. The anomaly directly above $T_{\rm C}$ in the fluctuation range goes along with an anomaly in the thermal expansion. While the lattice constant changes continuously and has only a kink at $T_{\rm C}$, all optical phonons soften abruptly suggesting a direct microscopic coupling between spin order and optical phonons rather than a reaction to magnetostriction effects.
  • We report the angular dependence of three distinct de Haas-van Alphen (dHvA) frequencies of the torque magnetization in the itinerant antiferromagnet CrB2 at temperatures down to 0.3K and magnetic fields up to 14T. Comparison with the calculated Fermi surface of nonmagnetic CrB2 suggests that two of the observed dHvA oscillations arise from electron-like Fermi surface sheets formed by bands with strong B-px,y character which should be rather insensitive to exchange splitting. The measured effective masses of these Fermi surface sheets display strong enhancements of up to a factor of two over the calculated band masses which we attribute to electron-phonon coupling and electronic correlations. For the temperature and field range studied, we do not observe signatures reminiscent of the heavy d-electron bands expected for antiferromagnetic CrB2. In view that the B-p bands are at the heart of conventional high-temperature superconductivity in the isostructural MgB2, we consider possible implications of our findings for nonmagnetic CrB2 and an interplay of itinerant antiferromagnetism with superconductivity.
  • We study the magnetic excitations of itinerant helimagnets by applying time-resolved optical spectroscopy to Fe0.8Co0.2Si. Optically excited oscillations of the magnetization in the helical state are found to disperse to lower frequency as the applied magnetic field is increased; the fingerprint of collective modes unique to helimagnets, known as helimagnons. The use of time-resolved spectroscopy allows us to address the fundamental magnetic relaxation processes by directly measuring the Gilbert damping, revealing the versatility of spin dynamics in chiral magnets. (*These authors contributed equally to this work)