• We present the results of a survey to detect low-mass companions of UMa group members, carried out in 2003-2006 with NACO at the ESO VLT. While many extra-solar planets and planetary candidates have been found in close orbits around stars by the radial velocity and the transit method, direct detections at wider orbits are rare. The Ursa Major (UMa) group, a young stellar association at an age of about 200-600 Myr and an average distance of 25 pc, has not yet been addressed as a whole although its members represent a very interesting sample to search for and characterize sub-stellar companions by direct imaging. Our goal was to find or to provide detection limits on wide sub-stellar companions around nearby UMa group members using high-resolution imaging. We searched for faint companions around 20 UMa group members within 30 pc. The primaries were placed below a semi-transparent coronagraph, a rather rarely used mode of NACO, to increase the dynamic range of the images. In most cases, second epoch images of companion candidates were taken to check whether they share common proper motion with the primary. Our coronagraphic images rule out sub-stellar companions around the stars of the sample. A dynamical range of typically 13-15 mag in the Ks band was achieved at separations beyond 3" from the star. Candidates as faint as Ks ~ 20 were securely identified and measured. The survey is most sensitive between separations of 100 and 200 au but only on average because of the very different target distance. Field coverage reaches about 650 au for the most distant targets. Most of the 200 candidates are visible in two epochs. All of those were rejected being distant background objects.
  • The Her-Lyr assoc., a nearby young MG, contains a few tens of ZAMS stars of SpT F to M. The existence and the properties of the Her-Lyr assoc. are controversial and discussed in the literature. The present work reassesses properties and the member list of Her-Lyr assoc., based on kinematics and age. Many objects form multiple systems or have low-mass companions and so we need to account for multiplicity. We use our own new imaging obs. and archival data to identify multiple systems. The colors and magnitudes of kinematic candidates are compared to isochrones. We derive further information on the age based on Li depletion, rotation, and coronal and chromospheric activity. A set of canonical members is identified to infer mean properties. Membership criteria are derived from the mean properties and used to discard non-members. The candidates selected from the literature belong to 35 stellar systems, 42.9% of which are multiple. Four multiple systems are confirmed in this work by common proper motion. An orbital solution is presented for the binary system HH Leo B and C. Indeed, a group of candidates displays signatures of youth. 7 canonical members are identified. The distribution of EWLi of canonical Her-Lyr members is spread widely and is similar to that of the Pleiades and the UMa group. Gyrochronology gives an age of 257+-46 Myr which is in between the ages of the Pleiades and the Ursa Major group. The measures of chromospheric and coronal activity support the young age. Four membership criteria are presented based on kinematics, EWLi, chromospheric activity, and gyro. age. In total, 11 stars are identified as certain members including co-moving objects plus additional 23 possible members while 14 candidates are doubtful or can be rejected. A comparison to the mass function, however, indicates the presence of a large number of additional unidentified low-mass members.
  • Using NACO on the VLT in the imaging mode we have detected an object at a distance of only 0.7 arcsec from GQ Lup. The object turns out to be co-moving. We have taken two K-band spectra with a resolution of lambda /Delta lambda=700. In here, we analyze the spectra in detail. We show that the shape of spectrum is not spoiled by differences in the Strehl ratio in the blue and in the red part, as well as differential refraction. We reanalyze the spectra and derive the spectral type of the companion using classical methods. We find that the object has a spectral type between M9V and L4V, which corresponds to a Teff between 1600 and 2500 K. Using GAIA-dusty models, we find that the spectral type derivation is robust against different log(g)-values. The Teff derived from the models is again in the range between 1800 and 2400 K. While the models reproduce nicely the general shape of the spectrum, the 12CO-lines in the spectrum have about half the depth as those in the model. We speculate that this difference might be caused by veiling, like in other objects of similar age, and spectral class. We also find that the absolute brightness of the companion matches that of other low-mass free-floating objects of similar age and spectral type. A comparison with the objects in USco observed by Mohanty et al. (2004) shows that the companion of GQ Lup has a lower mass than any of these, as it is of later spectral type, and younger. The same is as true, for the companion of AB Pic. To have a first estimate of the mass of the object we compare the derived Teff and luminosity with those calculated from evolutionary tracks. We also point out that future instruments, like NAHUAL, will finally allow us to derive the masses of such objects more precisely.
  • We present a companion of the \le 2 Myr young classical T Tauri star GQ Lup in the Lupus star forming region at 140 \pm 50 pc from imaging, astrometry, and spectroscopy. With direct K-band imaging using VLT/NACO, we detected an object 6 mag fainter than GQ Lup located 0.7 arc sec west of it. Compared to images obtained 2 to 5 years earlier with Subaru/CIAO and HST/PC, this object shares the proper motion of GQ Lup by 5 and 7 sigma, respectively, hence it is a co-moving companion. Its K-L' color is consistent with a spectral type early to mid L. Our NACO K-band spectrum yields spectral type M9-L4 with H2O and CO absorption, consistent with the new GAIA-Dusty template spectrum for log g = 2 to 3 and Teff = 2000 K with ~2 Rjup radius at ~140 pc, hence few Jupiter masses. Using the theoretical models from Wuchterl & Tscharnuter (2003), Burrows et al. (1997), and Baraffe et al. (2002), the mass lies between 1 and 42 Jupiter masses.