• In spinels ACr2O4 (A=Mg, Zn) realisation of the classical pyrochlore Heisenberg antiferromagnet model is complicated by a strong spin-lattice coupling: the extensive degeneracy of the ground state is lifted by a magneto-structural transition at TN=12.5 K. We study the resulting low-temperature low-symmetry crystal structure by synchrotron x-ray diffraction. The consistent features of x-ray low-temperature patterns are explained by the tetragonal model of Ehrenberg et. al (Pow. Diff. 17, 230( 2002)), while other features depend on sample or cooling protocol. Complex partially ordered magnetic state is studied by neutron diffraction and spherical neutron polarimetry. Multiple magnetic domains of configuration arms of the propagation vectors k1=(1/2 1/2 0), k2=(1 0 1/2) appear. The ordered moment reaches 1.94(3) muB/Cr3+ for k1 and 2.08(3) muB/Cr3+ for k2, if equal amount of the k1 and k2 phases is assumed. The magnetic arrangements have the dominant components along the [110] and [1-10] diagonals and a smaller c-component. By inelastic neutron scattering we investigate the spin excitations, which comprise a mixture of dispersive spin waves propagating from the magnetic Bragg peaks and resonance modes centered at equal energy steps of 4.5 meV. We interpret these as acoustic and optical spin wave branches, but show that the neutron scattering cross sections of transitions within a unit of two corner-sharing tetrahedra match the observed intensity distribution of the resonances. The distinctive fingerprint of cluster-like excitations in the optical spin wave branches suggests that propagating excitations are localized by the complex crystal structure and magnetic orders.
  • We have directly imaged reversible electrical switching of the cycloidal rotation direction (magnetic polarity) in a (111)-BiFeO3 epitaxial-film device at room temperature by non-resonant x-ray magnetic scattering. Consistent with previous reports, fully relaxed (111)-BiFeO3 epitaxial films consisting of a single ferroelectric domain were found to comprise a sub-micron-scale mosaic of magneto-elastic domains, all sharing a common direction of the magnetic polarity, which was found to switch reversibly upon reversal of the ferroelectric polarization without any measurable change of the magneto-elastic domain population. A real-space polarimetry map of our device clearly distinguished between regions of the sample electrically addressed into the two magnetic states with a resolution of a few tens of micron. Contrary to the general belief that the magneto-electric coupling in BiFeO3 is weak, we find that electrical switching has a dramatic effect on the magnetic structure, with the magnetic moments rotating on average by 90 degrees at every cycle.
  • The physical properties of epitaxial films can fundamentally differ from those of bulk single crystals even above the critical thickness. By a combination of non-resonant x-ray magnetic scattering, neutron diffraction and vector-mapped x-ray magnetic linear dichroism photoemission electron microscopy, we show that epitaxial (111)-BiFeO3 films support sub-micron antiferromagnetic domains, which are magneto-elastically coupled to a coherent crystallographic monoclinic twin structure. This unique texture, which is absent in bulk single crystals, should enable control of magnetism in BiFeO3 film devices via epitaxial strain.
  • Through a combination of neutron diffraction and Landau theory we describe the spin ordering in the ground state of the quadruple perovskite manganite CaMn7O12 - a magnetic multiferroic supporting an incommensurate orbital density wave that onsets above the magnetic ordering temperature, TN1 = 90 K. The multi-k magnetic structure in the ground state was found to be a nearly-constant-moment helix with modulated spin helicity, which oscillates in phase with the orbital occupancies on the Mn3+ sites via trilinear magneto-orbital coupling. Our phenomenological model also shows that, above TN2 = 48 K, the primary magnetic order parameter is locked into the orbital wave by an admixture of helical and collinear spin density wave structures. Furthermore, our model naturally explains the lack of a sharp dielectric anomaly at TN1 and the unusual temperature dependence of the electrical polarisation.
  • The layered honeycomb magnet $\alpha$-Li$_2$IrO$_3$ has been theoretically proposed as a candidate to display novel magnetic behaviour associated with Kitaev interactions between spin-orbit entangled $j_{\rm eff}=1/2$ magnetic moments on a honeycomb lattice. Here we report single crystal magnetic resonant x-ray diffraction combined with powder magnetic neutron diffraction to reveal an incommensurate magnetic order in the honeycomb layers with Ir magnetic moments counter-rotating on nearest-neighbour sites. This type of magnetic structure has not been reported experimentally before in honeycomb magnets and cannot be explained by a spin Hamiltonian with dominant isotropic (Heisenberg) couplings. The magnetic structure shares many key features with the magnetic order in the structural polytypes $\beta$ and $\gamma$-Li$_2$IrO$_3$, understood theoretically to be stabilized by dominant Kitaev interactions between Ir moments located on the vertices of three-dimensional hyperhoneycomb and stripyhoneycomb lattices, respectively. Based on this analogy and a theoretical soft-spin analysis of magnetic ground states for candidate spin Hamiltonians, we propose that Kitaev interactions also dominate in $\alpha$-Li$_2$IrO$_3$, indicative of universal Kitaev physics across all three members of the harmonic honeycomb family of Li$_2$IrO$_3$ polytypes.
  • Single crystal neutron diffraction is combined with synchrotron x-ray scattering to identify the different superlattice phases present in $Cs_{0.8}Fe_{1.6}Se_2$. A combination of single crystal refinements and first principles modelling are used to provide structural solutions for the $\sqrt{5}\times\sqrt{5}$ and $\sqrt{2}\times\sqrt{2}$ superlattice phases. The $\sqrt{5}\times\sqrt{5}$ superlattice structure is predominantly composed of ordered Fe vacancies and Fe distortions, whereas the $\sqrt{2}\times\sqrt{2}$ superlattice is composed of ordered Cs vacancies. The Cs vacancies only order within the plane, causing Bragg rods in reciprocal space. By mapping x-ray diffraction measurements with narrow spatial resolution over the surface of the sample, the structural domain pattern was determined, consistent with the notion of a majority antiferromagnetic $\sqrt{5}\times\sqrt{5}$ phase and a superconducting $\sqrt{2}\times\sqrt{2}$ phase.
  • The recently-synthesized iridate $\beta$-Li$_2$IrO$_3$ has been proposed as a candidate to display novel magnetic behavior stabilized by frustration effects from bond-dependent, anisotropic interactions (Kitaev model) on a three-dimensional "hyperhoneycomb" lattice. Here we report a combined study using neutron powder diffraction and magnetic resonant x-ray diffraction to solve the complete magnetic structure. We find a complex, incommensurate magnetic order with non-coplanar and counter-rotating Ir moments, which surprisingly shares many of its features with the related structural polytype "stripyhoneycomb" $\gamma$-Li$_2$IrO$_3$, where dominant Kitaev interactions have been invoked to explain the stability of the observed magnetic structure. The similarities of behavior between those two structural polytypes, which have different global lattice topologies but the same local connectivity, is strongly suggestive that the same magnetic interactions and the same underlying mechanism governs the stability of the magnetic order in both materials, indicating that both $\beta$- and $\gamma$-Li$_2$IrO$_3$ are strong candidates to realize dominant Kitaev interactions in a solid state material.
  • Materials that realize Kitaev spin models with bond-dependent anisotropic interactions have long been searched for, as the resulting frustration effects are predicted to stabilize novel forms of magnetic order or quantum spin liquids. Here we explore the magnetism of $\gamma$-Li$_2$IrO$_3$, which has the topology of a 3D Kitaev lattice of inter-connected Ir honeycombs. Using resonant magnetic x-ray diffraction we find a complex, yet highly-symmetric incommensurate magnetic structure with non-coplanar and counter-rotating Ir moments. We propose a minimal Kitaev-Heisenberg Hamiltonian that naturally accounts for all key features of the observed magnetic structure. Our results provide strong evidence that $\gamma$-Li$_2$IrO$_3$ realizes a spin Hamiltonian with dominant Kitaev interactions.
  • We report hard (14 keV) x-ray diffraction measurements on three compositions (x=0.11,0.12,0.13) of the high-temperature superconductor La2-xSrxCuO4. All samples show charge-density-wave (CDW) order with onset temperatures in the range 51-80 K and ordering wavevectors close to (0.23,0,0.5). The CDW is strongest with the longest in-plane correlation length near 1/8 doping. On entering the superconducting state the CDW is suppressed, demonstrating the strong competition between the charge order and superconductivity. CDW order coexists with incommensurate magnetic order and wavevectors of the two modulations have the simple relationship $\delta_{charge}= 2\delta_{spin}$. The intensity of the CDW Bragg peak tracks the intensity of the low-energy (quasi-elastic) spin fluctuations. We present a phase diagram of La2-xSrxCuO4 including the pseudogap phase, CDW and magnetic order.
  • The crystal structure of layered metal IrTe2 is determined using single-crystal x-ray diffraction. At T=220 K, it exhibits Ir and Te dimers forming a valence-bond crystal. Electronic structure calculations reveal an intriguing quasi-two-dimensional electronic state, with planes of reduced density of states cutting diagonally through the Ir and Te layers. These planes are formed by the Ir and Te dimers, which exhibit a signature of covalent bonding character development. Evidence for significant charge disproportionation among the dimerized and non-dimerized Ir (charge order) is also presented.
  • Magnetic domains at the surface of a ferroelectric monodomain BiFeO3 single crystal have been imaged by hard X-ray magnetic scattering. Magnetic domains up to several hundred microns in size have been observed, corresponding to cycloidal modulations of the magnetization along the wave-vector k=2\pi(\delta,\delta,0) and symmetry equivalent directions. The rotation direction of the magnetization in all magnetic domains, determined by diffraction of circularly polarized light, was found to be unique and in agreement with predictions of a combined approach based on a spin-model complemented by relativistic density-functional simulations. Imaging of the surface shows that the largest adjacent domains display a 120 degree vortex structure.
  • By combining bulk properties, neutron diffraction and non-resonant X-ray diffraction measurements, we demonstrate that the new multiferroic Cu$_3$Nb$_2$O$_8$ becomes polar simultaneously with the appearance of generalised helicoidal magnetic ordering. The electrical polarization is oriented perpendicularly to the common plane of rotation of the spins --- an observation that cannot be reconciled with the "conventional" theory developed for cycloidal multiferroics. Our results are consistent with coupling between a macroscopic structural rotation, which is allowed in the paramagnetic group, and magnetically-induced structural chirality.
  • Using powder neutron diffraction we have discovered an unusual magnetic order-order transition in the Ising spin chain compound Ca3Co2O6. On lowering the temperature an antiferromagnetic phase with propagation vector k=(0.5,-0.5,1) emerges from a higher temperature spin density wave structure with k=(0, 0, 1.01). This transition occurs over an unprecedented time-scale of several hours and is never complete.
  • We report resonant X-ray scattering measurements on the orbitally-degenerate triangular metallic antiferromagnet 2H-AgNiO2 to probe the spontaneous transition to a triple-cell superstructure at temperatures below 365 K. We observe a strong resonant enhancement of the supercell reflections through the Ni K-edge. The empirically extracted K-edge shift between the crystallographically-distinct Ni sites of 2.5(3) eV is much larger than the value expected from the shift in final states, and implies a core-level shift of ~1 eV, thus providing direct evidence for the onset of spontaneous honeycomb charge order in the triangular Ni layers. We also provide band-structure calculations that explain quantitatively the observed edge shifts in terms of changes in the Ni electronic energy levels due to charge order and hybridization with the surrounding oxygens.
  • We have investigated the spin fluctuations in the langasite compound Ba3NbFe3Si2O14 in both the ordered state and as a function of temperature. The low temperature magnetic structure is defined by a spiral phase characterized by magnetic Bragg peaks at q=(0,0,tau ~ 1/7) onset at TN=27 K as previously reported by Marty et al. The nature of the fluctuations and temperature dependence of the order parameter is consistent with a classical second order phase transition for a two dimensional triangular antiferromagnet. We will show that the physical properties and energy scales including the ordering wavevector, Curie-Weiss temperature, and the spin-waves can be explained through the use of only symmetric exchange constants without the need for the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction. This is accomplished through a set of ``helical" exchange pathways along the c direction imposed by the chiral crystal structure and naturally explains the magnetic diffuse scattering which displays a strong vector chirality up to high temperatures well above the ordering temperature. This illustrates a strong coupling between magnetic and crystalline chirality in this compound.
  • We have performed a resonant x-ray scattering (RXS) study near the Co K edge on a single crystal of Ca3Co2O6. In the magnetically ordered phase a new class of weak reflections appears at the magnetic propagation vector tau (1/3,1/3,1/3). These new reflections allow direct access to the dipolar-quadrupolar E1E2 scattering channel. The theoretical possibility of observing isolated E1E2 electromagnetic multipoles has attracted a lot of interest in the recent years. Unfortunately in many system of interest, parity even and parity odd tensor contributions occur at the same positions in reciprocal space. We demonstrate that in Ca3Co2O6 it is possible to completely separate the parity even from the parity odd terms. The possibility of observing such terms even in globally centrosymmetric systems using RXS has been investigated theoretically; Ca3Co2O6 allows a symmetry based separation of this contribution.
  • The commensurate phase of multiferroic HoMn2O5 was studied by X-ray magnetic scattering, both off resonance and in resonant conditions at the Ho-L3 edge. Below 40 K, magnetic ordering at the Ho sites is induced by the main Mn magnetic order parameter, and its temperature dependence is well accounted for by a simple Curie-Weiss susceptibility model. A lattice distortion of periodicity twice that of the magnetic order is also evidenced. Azimuthal scans confirm the model of the magnetic structure recently refined from neutron diffraction data for both Mn and Ho sites, indicating that the two sublattices interact via magnetic superexchange.
  • We have performed a resonant x-ray scattering study at the Co pre-K edge on a single crystal of Ca3Co2O6. The measurements reveal an abrupt transition to a magnetically ordered state immediately below T_N = 25 K, with a magnetic correlation length in excess of 5500 {\AA} along the c-axis chains. There is no evidence for modifications to the Co$^{3+}$ spin state. A temperature dependent modulation in the magnetic order along the c-axis and an unusual decrease in the magnetic correlation lengths on cooling are observed. The results are compatible with the onset of a partially disordered antiferromagnetic structure in Ca3Co2O6.
  • A thorough tensor analysis of the Bragg-forbidden reflection (00.3)$_h$ in corundum systems having a global center of inversion, like V$_2$O$_3$ and $\alpha$-Fe$_2$O$_3$, shows that anomalous x-ray resonant diffraction can access chiral properties related to the dipole-quadrupole (E1-E2) channel via an interference with the pure quadrupole-quadrupole (E2-E2) process. This is also confirmed by independent {\it ab initio} numerical simulations. In such a way it becomes possible, in this particular case, to estimate the intensity of the ``twisted'' trigonal crystal field ($C_3$ symmetry) and, in general, to detect chiral quantities in systems where dichroic absorption techniques are ineffective.