• Finding the sources responsible for the hydrogen reionization is one of the most pressing issues in cosmology. Bright QSOs are known to ionize their surrounding neighborhood, but they are too few to ensure the required HI ionizing background. A significant contribution by faint AGNs, however, could solve the problem, as recently advocated on the basis of a relatively large space density of faint active nuclei at z>4. We have carried out an exploratory spectroscopic program to measure the HI ionizing emission of 16 faint AGNs spanning a broad U-I color interval, with I~21-23 and 3.6<z<4.2. These AGNs are three magnitudes fainter than the typical SDSS QSOs (M1450<~-26) which are known to ionize their surrounding IGM at z>~4. The LyC escape fraction has been detected with S/N ratio of ~10-120 and is between 44 and 100% for all the observed faint AGNs, with a mean value of 74% at 3.6<z<4.2 and -25.1<M1450<-23.3, in agreement with the value found in the literature for much brighter QSOs (M1450<~-26) at the same redshifts. The LyC escape fraction of our faint AGNs does not show any dependence on the absolute luminosities or on the observed U-I colors. Assuming that the LyC escape fraction remains close to ~75% down to M1450~-18, we find that the AGN population can provide between 16 and 73% (depending on the adopted luminosity function) of the whole ionizing UV background at z~4, measured through the Lyman forest. This contribution increases to 25-100% if other determinations of the ionizing UV background are adopted. Extrapolating these results to z~5-7, there are possible indications that bright QSOs and faint AGNs can provide a significant contribution to the reionization of the Universe, if their space density is high at M1450~-23.
  • The reionization of the Universe is one of the most important topics of present day astrophysical research. The most plausible candidates for the reionization process are star-forming galaxies, which according to the predictions of the majority of the theoretical and semi-analytical models should dominate the HI ionizing background at z~3. We aim at measuring the Lyman continuum escape fraction, which is one of the key parameters to compute the contribution of star-forming galaxies to the UV background. We have used ultra-deep U-band imaging (U=30.2mag at 1sigma) by LBC/LBT in the CANDELS/GOODS-North field, as well as deep imaging in COSMOS and EGS fields, in order to estimate the Lyman continuum escape fraction of 69 star-forming galaxies with secure spectroscopic redshifts at 3.27<z<3.40 to faint magnitude limits (L=0.2L*, or equivalently M1500~-19). We have measured through stacks a stringent upper limit (<1.7% at 1sigma) for the relative escape fraction of HI ionizing photons from bright galaxies (L>L*), while for the faint population (L=0.2L*) the limit to the escape fraction is ~10%. We have computed the contribution of star-forming galaxies to the observed UV background at z~3 and we have found that it is not enough to keep the Universe ionized at these redshifts, unless their escape fraction increases significantly (>10%) at low luminosities (M1500>-19). We compare our results on the Lyman continuum escape fraction of high-z galaxies with recent estimates in the literature and discuss future prospects to shed light on the end of the Dark Ages. In the future, strong gravitational lensing will be fundamental to measure the Lyman continuum escape fraction down to faint magnitudes (M1500~-16) which are inaccessible with the present instrumentation on blank fields.
  • The Lyman continuum (LyC) flux escaping from high-z galaxies into the IGM is a fundamental quantity to understand the physical processes involved in the reionization epoch. We have investigated a sample of star-forming galaxies at z~3.3 in order to search for possible detections of LyC photons escaping from galaxy halos. UV deep imaging in the COSMOS field obtained with the prime focus camera LBC at the LBT telescope was used together with a catalog of spectroscopic redshifts obtained by the VIMOS Ultra Deep Survey (VUDS) to build a sample of 45 galaxies at z~3.3 with L>0.5L*. We obtained deep LBC images of galaxies with spectroscopic redshifts in the interval 3.27<z<3.40 both in the R and deep U bands. A sub-sample of 10 galaxies apparently shows escape fractions>28% but a detailed analysis of their properties reveals that, with the exception of two marginal detections (S/N~2) in the U band, all the other 8 galaxies are most likely contaminated by the UV flux of low-z interlopers located close to the high-z targets. The average escape fraction derived from the stacking of the cleaned sample was constrained to fesc_rel<2%. The implied HI photo-ionization rate is a factor two lower than that needed to keep the IGM ionized at z~3, as observed in the Lyman forest of high-z QSO spectra or by the proximity effect. These results support a scenario where high redshift, relatively bright (L>0.5L*) star-forming galaxies alone are unable to sustain the level of ionization observed in the cosmic IGM at z~3. Star-forming galaxies at higher redshift and at fainter luminosities (L<<L*) can be the major contributors to the reionization of the Universe only if their physical properties are subject to rapid changes from z~3 to z~6-10. Alternatively, ionizing sources could be discovered looking for fainter sources among the AGN population at high-z.
  • We have studied the dependence of the AGN nuclear radio (1.4 GHz) luminosity on both the AGN 2-10 keV X-ray and the host-galaxy K-band luminosity. A complete sample of 1268 X-ray selected AGN (both type 1 and type 2) has been used, which is the largest catalogue of AGN belonging to statistically well defined samples where radio, X and K band information exists. At variance with previous studies, radio upper limits have been statistically taken into account using a Bayesian Maximum Likelihood fitting method. It resulted that a good fit is obtained assuming a plane in the 3D L_R-L_X-L_K space, namely logL_R= xi_X logL_X + xi_K logL_K + xi_0, having a ~1 dex wide (1 sigma) spread in radio luminosity. As already shown, no evidence of bimodality in the radio luminosity distribution was found and therefore any definition of radio loudness in AGN is arbitrary. Using scaling relations between the BH mass and the host galaxy K-band luminosity, we have also derived a new estimate of the BH fundamental plane (in the L_5GHz -L_X-M_BH space). Our analysis shows that previous measures of the BH fundamental plane are biased by ~0.8 dex in favor of the most luminous radio sources. Therefore, many AGN studies, where the BH fundamental plane is used to investigate how AGN regulate their radiative and mechanical luminosity as a function of the accretion rate, or many AGN/galaxy co-evolution models, where radio-feedback is computed using the AGN fundamental plane, should revise their conclusions.