• Small-scale dynamos are expected to operate in all astrophysical fluids that are turbulent and electrically conducting, for example the interstellar medium, stellar interiors, and accretion disks, where they may also be affected by or competing with large-scale dynamos. However, the possibility of small-scale dynamos being excited at small and intermediate ratios of viscosity to magnetic diffusivity (the magnetic Prandtl number) has been debated, and the possibility of them depending on the large-scale forcing wavenumber has been raised. Here we show, using four values of the forcing wavenumber, that the small-scale dynamo does not depend on the scale-separation between the size of the simulation domain and the integral scale of the turbulence, i.e., the forcing scale. Moreover, the spectral bottleneck in turbulence, which has been implied as being responsible for raising the excitation conditions of small-scale dynamos, is found to be invariant under changing the forcing wavenumber. Our work is relevant to future studies of small-scale dynamos, of which several applications are being discussed.
  • We develop a mean-field theory of compressibility effects in turbulent magnetohydrodynamics and passive scalar transport using the quasi-linear approximation and the spectral $\tau$-approach. We find that compressibility decreases the $\alpha$ effect and the turbulent magnetic diffusivity both at small and large magnetic Reynolds numbers, Rm. Similarly, compressibility decreases the turbulent diffusivity for passive scalars both at small and large P\'eclet numbers, Pe. On the other hand, compressibility does not affect the effective pumping velocity of the magnetic field for large Rm, but it decreases it for small Rm. Density stratification causes turbulent pumping of passive scalars, but it is found to become weaker with increasing compressibility. No such pumping effect exists for magnetic fields. However, compressibility results in a new passive scalar pumping effect from regions of low to high turbulent intensity both for small and large P\'eclet numbers. It can be interpreted as compressible turbophoresis of noninertial particles and gaseous admixtures, while the classical turbophoresis effect exists only for inertial particles and causes them to be pumped to regions with lower turbulent intensity.
  • The formation of sunspots and starspots is not yet fully understood and is therefore one of the major open problems in solar and stellar physics. Magnetic flux concentrations can be produced by the negative effective magnetic pressure instability (NEMPI). This instability is strongly suppressed by rotation. However, the presence of an outer coronal envelope was previously found to strengthen the flux concentrations and make them more prominent. It also allows for the formation of bipolar regions (BRs). We want to know whether the presence of an outer coronal envelope also changes the excitation conditions and the rotational dependence of NEMPI. We use direct numerical simulations and mean-field simulations. We adopt a simple two-layer model of turbulence that mimics the jump between the convective turbulent and coronal layers below and above the surface of a star, respectively. The computational domain is Cartesian and located at a certain latitude of a rotating sphere. We investigate the effects of rotation on NEMPI by changing the Coriolis number, the latitude, and the box resolution. Rotation has a strong impact on the process of BR formation. Even rather slow rotation is found to suppress their formation. However, increasing the imposed magnetic field strength also makes the structures stronger and alleviates the rotational suppression somewhat. The presence of a coronal layer itself does not significantly alleviate the effects of rotational suppression.
  • We investigate the effect of turbulence on the collisional growth of um-sized droplets by high-resolution numerical simulations with well resolved Kolmogorov scales, assuming a collision and coalescence efficiency of unity. The droplet dynamics and collisions are approximated using a superparticle approach. We show that the time evolution of the shape of the droplet-size distribution due to turbulence-induced collision depends strongly on the turbulent energy-dissipation rate, but only weakly on the Reynolds number. The size distribution exhibits power law behavior with a slope of -3.7 in the size range of about 10-40 um, which is close to the power law size distribution found for interstellar dust grains. When gravity is invoked, the strong dependency becomes weakened. Turbulence is found to dominate the time evolution of an initially monodisperse droplet distribution at early times. At later times, however, gravity takes over and dominates the collisional growth. With combined turbulence and gravity, the time scale to reach drizzle sized droplets is about 900 s, which is close to the time scale of rapid warm rain formation. The collision rate grows exponentially, which is consistent with the theoretical prediction of the continuous collisional growth even when the turbulence-generated collision is invoked.
  • To explain the large-scale magnetic field of the Sun and other bodies, mean-field dynamo theory is commonly applied where one solves the averaged equations for the mean magnetic field. However, the standard approach breaks down when the scale of the turbulent eddies becomes comparable to the scale of the variations of the mean magnetic field. Models showing sharp magnetic field structures have therefore been regarded as unreliable. Our aim is to look for new effects that occur when we relax the restrictions of the standard approach, which becomes particularly important at the bottom of the convection zone where the size of the turbulent eddies is comparable to the depth of the convection zone itself. We approximate the underlying integro-differential equation by a partial differential equation corresponding to a reaction-diffusion type equation for the mean electromotive force, making an approach that is nonlocal in space and time feasible under conditions where spherical geometry and nonlinearity are included. In agreement with earlier findings, spatio-temporal nonlocality lowers the excitation conditions of the dynamo. Sharp structures are now found to be absent. However, in the surface layers the field remains similar to before.
  • Context: Convectively-driven flows play a crucial role in the dynamo processes that are responsible for producing magnetic activity in stars and planets. It is still not fully understood why many astrophysical magnetic fields have a significant large-scale component. Aims: Our aim is to investigate the dynamo properties of compressible convection in a rapidly rotating Cartesian domain, focusing upon a parameter regime in which the underlying hydrodynamic flow is known to be unstable to a large-scale vortex instability. Methods: The governing equations of three-dimensional nonlinear magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) are solved numerically. Different numerical schemes are compared and we propose a possible benchmark case for other similar codes. Results: In keeping with previous related studies, we find that convection in this parameter regime can drive a large-scale dynamo. The components of the mean horizontal magnetic field oscillate, leading to a continuous overall rotation of the mean field. Whilst the large-scale vortex instability dominates the early evolution of the system, it is suppressed by the magnetic field and makes a negligible contribution to the mean electromotive force that is responsible for driving the large-scale dynamo. The cycle period of the dynamo is comparable to the ohmic decay time, with longer cycles for dynamos in convective systems that are closer to onset. In these particular simulations, large-scale dynamo action is found only when vertical magnetic field boundary conditions are adopted at the upper and lower boundaries. Strongly modulated large-scale dynamos are found at higher Rayleigh numbers, with periods of reduced activity ("grand minima"-like events) occurring during transient phases in which the large-scale vortex temporarily re-establishes itself, before being suppressed again by the magnetic field.
  • The magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) description of plasmas with relativistic particles necessarily includes an additional new field, the chiral chemical potential associated with the axial charge (i.e., the number difference between right- and left-handed relativistic fermions). This chiral chemical potential gives rise to a contribution to the electric current density of the plasma (\emph{chiral magnetic effect}). We present a self-consistent treatment of the \emph{chiral MHD equations}, which include the back-reaction of the magnetic field on a chiral chemical potential and its interaction with the plasma velocity field. A number of novel phenomena are exhibited. First, we show that the chiral magnetic effect decreases the frequency of the Alfv\'{e}n wave for incompressible flows, increases the frequencies of the Alfv\'{e}n wave and of the fast magnetosonic wave for compressible flows, and decreases the frequency of the slow magnetosonic wave. Second, we show that, in addition to the well-known laminar chiral dynamo effect, which is not related to fluid motions, there is a dynamo caused by the joint action of velocity shear and chiral magnetic effect. In the presence of turbulence with vanishing mean kinetic helicity, the derived mean-field chiral MHD equations describe turbulent large-scale dynamos caused by the chiral alpha effect, which is dominant for large fluid and magnetic Reynolds numbers. The chiral alpha effect is due to an interaction of the chiral magnetic effect and fluctuations of the small-scale current produced by tangling magnetic fluctuations (which are generated by tangling of the large-scale magnetic field by sheared velocity fluctuations). These dynamo effects may have interesting consequences in the dynamics of the early universe, neutron stars, and the quark--gluon plasma.
  • Using numerical simulations of forced turbulence, it is shown that for magnetic Reynolds numbers larger than unity, i.e., beyond the regime of quasilinear theory, the turbulent magnetic diffusivity attains an additional negative contribution that is quadratic in the kinetic helicity. In particular, for large magnetic Reynolds numbers, the turbulent magnetic diffusivity without helicity is about twice the value with helicity. Such a contribution was not previously anticipated, but, as we discuss, it turns out to be important when accurate estimates of the turbulent magnetic diffusivity are needed.
  • Turbulence is argued to play a crucial role in cloud droplet growth. The combined problem of turbulence and cloud droplet growth is numerically challenging. Here, an Eulerian scheme based on the Smoluchowski equation is compared with two Lagrangian superparticle (or su- perdroplet) schemes in the presence of condensation and collection. The growth processes are studied either separately or in combination using either two-dimensional turbulence, a steady flow, or just gravitational acceleration without gas flow. Good agreement between the differ- ent schemes for the time evolution of the size spectra is observed in the presence of gravity or turbulence. Higher moments of the size spectra are found to be a useful tool to characterize the growth of the largest drops through collection. Remarkably, the tails of the size spectra are reasonably well described by a gamma distribution in cases with gravity or turbulence. The Lagrangian schemes are generally found to be superior over the Eulerian one in terms of computational performance. However, it is shown that the use of interpolation schemes such as the cloud-in-cell algorithm is detrimental in connection with superparticle or superdroplet approaches. Furthermore, the use of symmetric over asymmetric collection schemes is shown to reduce the amount of scatter in the results.
  • A brief summary of the various observations and constraints that underlie solar dynamo research are presented. The arguments that indicate that the solar dynamo is an alpha-omega dynamo of the Babcock-Leighton type are then shortly reviewed. The main open questions that remain are concerned with the subsurface dynamics, including why sunspots emerge at preferred latitudes as seen in the familiar butterfly wings, why the cycle is about 11 years long, and why the sunspot groups emerge tilted with respect to the equator (Joy's law). Next, we turn to magnetic helicity, whose conservation property has been identified with the decline of large-scale magnetic fields found in direct numerical simulations at large magnetic Reynolds numbers. However, magnetic helicity fluxes through the solar surface can alleviate this problem and connect theory with observations, as will be discussed.
  • Strongly stratified hydromagnetic turbulence has recently been identified as a candidate for explaining the spontaneous formation of magnetic flux concentrations by the negative effective magnetic pressure instability (NEMPI). Much of this work has been done for isothermal layers for which the density scale height is constant throughout. We now study the validity of earlier conclusions about the size and growth rate of magnetic structures in the case of polytropic layers, which scale height decreases sharply towards the surface. To allow for a continuous transition from isothermal to polytropic layers, we employ a generalization of the exponential function known as the q-exponential. Now, the top of the polytropic layer shifts with the polytropic index such that the scale height at some reference height is always the same. We use both mean-field and direct numerical simulations of forced stratified turbulence to determine the resulting flux concentrations. Magnetic structures begin to form at a depth where magnetic field strength is about 3-4% the local equipartition field strength with respect to the turbulent kinetic energy. Unlike the isothermal case where stronger fields can give rise to magnetic flux concentrations at larger depths, in the polytropic one the growth rates decreases for structures deeper down. For vertical fields, magnetic structures of super-equipartition strengths are formed because such fields survive downward advection, unlike NEMPI under horizontal magnetic fields. The horizontal cross-section of such structures is approximately circular. Results based on isothermal models can be applied locally to polytropic layers. For vertical fields, magnetic flux concentrations of super-equipartition strengths form, which supports suggestions that sunspot formation might be a shallow phenomenon.
  • We calculate the mean electromotive force in plane Couette flows of a nonrotating conducting fluid under the influence of a large-scale magnetic field for driven turbulence. A vertical stratification of the turbulence intensity results in an alpha effect owing to the presence of horizontal shear. Here we discuss the possibility of an experimental determination of the components of the alpha tensor using both quasilinear theory and nonlinear numerical simulations. For magnetic Prandtl numbers of the order of unity, we find that in the high-conductivity limit the alpha effect in the direction of the flow clearly exceeds the component in spanwise direction. In this limit, alpha runs linearly with the magnetic Reynolds number Rm while in the low-conductivity limit it runs with the product Rm*Re, where Re is the kinetic Reynolds number so that for given Rm the alpha effect grows with decreasing magnetic Prandtl number. For the small magnetic Prandtl numbers of liquid metals, a common value for the horizontal elements of the alpha tensor appears, which makes it unimportant whether the alpha effect is measured in the spanwise or streamwise directions. The resulting effect should lead to an observable voltage in both directions of about 0.5 mV for magnetic fields of 1 kgauss and velocity fluctuations of about 1 m/s in a channel of 50 cm height (independent of its width).
  • Strongly stratified hydromagnetic turbulence has previously been found to produce magnetic flux concentrations if the domain is large enough compared with the size of turbulent eddies. Mean-field simulations (MFS) using parameterizations of the Reynolds and Maxwell stresses show a negative effective magnetic pressure instability and have been able to reproduce many aspects of direct numerical simulations (DNS) regarding the growth rate of this large-scale instability, shape of the resulting magnetic structures, and their height as a function of magnetic field strength. Unlike the case of an imposed horizontal field, for a vertical one, magnetic flux concentrations of equipartition strength with the turbulence can be reached. This results in magnetic spots that are reminiscent of sunspots. Here we want to find out under what conditions magnetic flux concentrations with vertical field occur and what their internal structure is. We use a combination of MFS, DNS, and implicit large-eddy simulations to characterize the resulting magnetic flux concentrations in forced isothermal turbulence with an imposed vertical magnetic field. We confirm earlier results that in the kinematic stage of the large-scale instability the horizontal wavelength of structures is about 10 times the density scale height. At later times, even larger structures are being produced in a fashion similar to inverse spectral transfer in helically driven turbulence. Using turbulence simulations, we find that magnetic flux concentrations occur for different values of the Mach number between 0.1 and 0.7. DNS and MFS show magnetic flux tubes with mean-field energies comparable to the turbulent kinetic energy. The resulting vertical magnetic flux tubes are being confined by downflows along the tubes and corresponding inflow from the sides, which keep the field concentrated.
  • Recent progress in astrophysical hydromagnetic turbulence is being reviewed. The physical ideas behind the now widely accepted Goldreich--Sridhar model and its extension to compressible magnetohydrodynamic turbulence are introduced. Implications for cosmic ray diffusion and acceleration is being discussed. Dynamo-generated magnetic fields with and without helicity are contrasted against each other. Certain turbulent transport processes are being modified and often suppressed by anisotropy and inhomogeneities of the turbulence, while others are being produced by such properties, which can lead to new large-scale instabilities of the turbulent medium. Applications of various such processes to astrophysical systems are being considered.
  • In a strongly stratified turbulent layer, a uniform horizontal magnetic field can become unstable to spontaneously form local flux concentrations due to a negative contribution of turbulence to the large-scale (mean-field) magnetic pressure. This mechanism, called the negative effective magnetic pressure instability (NEMPI), is of interest in connection with dynamo scenarios where most of the magnetic field resides in the bulk of the convection zone, and not at the bottom. Recent work using the mean-field hydromagnetic equations has shown that NEMPI becomes suppressed at rather low rotation rates with Coriolis numbers as low as 0.1.}{Here we extend these earlier investigations by studying the effects of rotation both on the development of NEMPI and on the effective magnetic pressure. We also quantify the kinetic helicity from direct numerical simulations (DNS) and compare with earlier work.}{To calculate the rotational effect on the effective magnetic pressure we consider both DNS and analytical studies using the $\tau$ approach. To study the effects of rotation on the development of NEMPI we use both DNS and mean-field calculations of the 3D hydromagnetic equations in a Cartesian domain.}{We find that the growth rates of NEMPI from earlier mean-field calculations are well reproduced with DNS, provided the Coriolis number is below about 0.06. In that case, kinetic and magnetic helicities are found to be weak. For faster rotation, dynamo action becomes possible. However, there is an intermediate range of rotation rates where dynamo action on its own is not yet possible, but the rotational suppression of NEMPI is being alleviated.}{Production of magnetic flux concentrations through the suppression of turbulent pressure appears to be possible only in the upper-most layers of the Sun, where the convective turnover time is less than 2 hours.}
  • Energetic nonthermal particles (cosmic rays, CRs) are accelerated in supernova remnants, relativistic jets and other astrophysical objects. The CR energy density is typically comparable with that of the thermal components and magnetic fields. In this review we discuss mechanisms of magnetic field amplification due to instabilities induced by CRs. We derive CR kinetic and magnetohydrodynamic equations that govern cosmic plasma systems comprising the thermal background plasma, comic rays and fluctuating magnetic fields to study CR-driven instabilities. Both resonant and non-resonant instabilities are reviewed, including the Bell short-wavelength instability, and the firehose instability. Special attention is paid to the longwavelength instabilities driven by the CR current and pressure gradient. The helicity production by the CR current-driven instabilities is discussed in connection with the dynamo mechanisms of cosmic magnetic field amplification.
  • A central quantity in mean-field magnetohydrodynamics is the mean electromotive force EMF, which in general depends on the mean magnetic field. It may however have a part independent of the mean magnetic field. Here we study an example of a rotating conducting body of turbulent fluid with non-zero cross-helicity, in which a contribution to the EMF proportional to the angular velocity occurs (Yoshizawa 1990). If the forcing is helical, it also leads to an alpha effect, and large-scale magnetic fields can be generated. For not too rapid rotation, the field configuration is such that Yoshizawa's contribution to the EMF is considerably reduced compared to the case without alpha effect. In that case, large-scale flows are also found to be generated.
  • Using simulations of slowly rotating stratified turbulence, we show that the alpha effect responsible for the generation of astrophysical magnetic fields is proportional to the logarithmic gradient of kinetic energy density rather than that of momentum, as was previously thought. This result is in agreement with a new analytic theory developed in this paper for large Reynolds numbers. Thus, the contribution of density stratification is less important than that of turbulent velocity. The alpha effect and other turbulent transport coefficients are determined by means of the test-field method. In addition to forced turbulence, we also investigate supernova-driven turbulence and stellar convection. In some cases (intermediate rotation rate for forced turbulence, convection with intermediate temperature stratification, and supernova-driven turbulence) we find that the contribution of density stratification might be even less important than suggested by the analytic theory.
  • We study the role of viscosity and the effects of a magnetic field on a rotating, self-gravitating fluid, using Newtonian theory and adopting the ideal magnetohydrodynamic approximation. Our results confirm that viscosity can generate vorticity in inhomogeneous environments, while the magnetic tension can produce vorticity even in the absence of fluid pressure and density gradients. Linearizing our equations around an Einstein-de Sitter cosmology, we find that viscosity adds to the diluting effect of the universal expansion. Typically, however, the dissipative viscous effects are confined to relatively small scales. We also identify the characteristic length bellow which the viscous dissipation is strong and beyond which viscosity is essentially negligible. In contrast, magnetism seems to favor cosmic rotation. The magnetic presence is found to slow down the standard decay-rate of linear vortices, thus leading to universes with more residual rotation than generally anticipated.
  • As was demonstrated in earlier studies, turbulence can result in a negative contribution to the effective mean magnetic pressure, which, in turn, can cause a large-scale instability. In this study, hydromagnetic mean-field modelling is performed for an isothermally stratified layer in the presence of a horizontal magnetic field. The negative effective magnetic pressure instability (NEMPI) is comprehensively investigated. It is shown that, if the effect of turbulence on the mean magnetic tension force vanishes, which is consistent with results from direct numerical simulations of forced turbulence, the fastest growing eigenmodes of NEMPI are two-dimensional. The growth rate is found to depend on a parameter beta_* characterizing the turbulent contribution of the effective mean magnetic pressure for moderately strong mean magnetic fields. A fit formula is proposed that gives the growth rate as a function of turbulent kinematic viscosity, turbulent magnetic diffusivity, the density scale height, and the parameter beta_*. The strength of the imposed magnetic field does not explicitly enter provided the location of the vertical boundaries are chosen such that the maximum of the eigenmode of NEMPI fits into the domain. The formation of sunspots and solar active regions is discussed as possible applications of NEMPI.
  • Small levels of turbulence can be present in stellar radiative interiors due to, e.g., instability of rotational shear. In this paper we estimate turbulent transport coefficients for stably stratified rotating stellar radiation zones. Stable stratification induces strong anisotropy with a very small ratio of radial-to-horizontal turbulence intensities. Angular momentum is transported mainly due to the correlation between azimuthal and radial turbulent motions induced by the Coriolis force. This non-diffusive transport known as the Lambda-effect has outward direction in radius and is much more efficient compared to the effect of radial eddy viscosity. Chemical species are transported by small radial diffusion only. This result is confirmed using direct numerical simulations combined with the test-scalar method. As a consequence of the non-diffusive transport of angular momentum, the estimated characteristic time of rotational coupling (< 100 Myr) between radiative core and convective envelope in young solar-type stars is much shorter compared to the time-scale of Lithium depletion (~1 Gyr).
  • We simulate the magnetic feature tracking (MFT) speed using advective-diffusive transport models in both one and two dimensions. By depositing magnetic bipolar regions at different latitudes at the Sun's surface and following their evolution for a prescribed meridional circulation and magnetic diffusivity profiles, we derive the MFT speed as a function of latitude. We find that in a one dimensional surface-transport model the simulated MFT speed at the surface is always the same as the meridional flow-speed used as input to the model, but is different in a two-dimensional transport model in the meridional (r,theta) plane. The difference depends on the value of the magnetic diffusivity and on the radial gradient of the latitudinal velocity. We have confirmed our results with two different codes in spherical and Cartesian coordinates.
  • Using simulations of helically driven turbulence, it is shown that the ratio of kinetic to magnetic energy dissipation scales with the magnetic Prandtl number in power law fashion with an exponent of approximately 0.6. Over six orders of magnitude in the magnetic Prandtl number the magnetic field is found to be sustained by large-scale dynamo action of alpha-squared type. This work extends a similar finding for small magnetic Prandtl numbers to the regime of large magnetic Prandtl numbers. At large magnetic Prandtl numbers, most of the energy is dissipated viscously, lowering thus the amount of magnetic energy dissipation, which means that simulations can be performed at magnetic Reynolds numbers that are large compared to the usual limits imposed by a given resolution. This is analogous to an earlier finding that at small magnetic Prandtl numbers, most of the energy is dissipated resistively, lowering the amount of kinetic energy dissipation, so simulations can then be performed at much larger fluid Reynolds numbers than otherwise. The decrease in magnetic energy dissipation at large magnetic Prandtl numbers is discussed in the context of underluminous accretion found in some quasars.
  • While the rising flux tube paradigm is an elegant theory, its basic assumptions, thin flux tubes at the bottom of the convection zone with field strengths two orders of magnitude above equipartition, remain numerically unverified at best. As such, in recent years the idea of a formation of sunspots near the top of the convection zone has generated some interest. The presence of turbulence can strongly enhance diffusive transport mechanisms, leading to an effective transport coefficient formalism in the mean-field formulation. The question is what happens to these coefficients when the turbulence becomes anisotropic due to a strong large-scale mean magnetic field. It has been noted in the past that this anisotropy can also lead to highly non-diffusive behaviour. In the present work we investigate the formation of large-scale magnetic structures as a result of a negative contribution of turbulence to the large-scale effective magnetic pressure in the presence of stratification. In direct numerical simulations of forced turbulence in a stratified box, we verify the existence of this effect. This phenomenon can cause formation of large-scale magnetic structures even from initially uniform large-scale magnetic field.
  • Direct numerical simulations and mean-field theory are used to model reactive front propagation in a turbulent medium. In the mean-field approach, memory effects of turbulent diffusion are taken into account to estimate the front speed in cases when the Damkohler number is large. This effect is found to saturate the front speed to values comparable with the speed of the turbulent motions. By comparing with direct numerical simulations, it is found that the effective correlation time is much shorter than for non-reacting flows. The nonlinearity of the reaction term is found to make the front speed slightly faster.