• We present Neutron Star Interior Composition Explorer (NICER) observations of the neutron star low-mass X-ray binary Serpens X-1 during the early mission phase in 2017. With the high spectral sensitivity and low-energy X-ray passband of NICER, we are able to detect the Fe L line complex in addition to the signature broad, asymmetric Fe K line. We confirm the presence of these lines by comparing the NICER data to archival observations with XMM-Newton/RGS and NuSTAR. Both features originate close to the innermost stable circular orbit (ISCO). When modeling the lines with the relativistic line model RELLINE, we find the Fe L blend requires an inner disk radius of $1.4_{-0.1}^{+0.2}$ $R_{\mathrm{ISCO}}$ and Fe K is at $1.03_{-0.03}^{+0.13}$ $R_{\mathrm{ISCO}}$ (errors quoted at 90%). This corresponds to a position of $17.3_{-1.2}^{+2.5}$ km and $12.7_{-0.4}^{+1.6}$ km for a canonical neutron star mass ($M_{\mathrm{NS}}=1.4\ M_{\odot}$) and dimensionless spin value of $a=0$. Additionally, we employ a new version of the RELXILL model tailored for neutron stars and determine that these features arise from a dense disk and supersolar Fe abundance.
  • We present a detailed X-ray timing analysis of the highly variable NLS1 galaxy, IRAS 13224-3809. The source was recently monitored for 1.5 Ms with XMM-Newton which, combined with 500 ks archival data, makes this the best studied NLS1 galaxy in X-rays to date. We apply a full suite of timing methods in both the time- and Fourier-domain in order to understand the underlying variability process. The source flux is not distributed lognormally, as would be expected for accreting sources. The first non-linear rms-flux relation for any accreting source in any waveband is found, with $\mathrm{rms} \propto \mathrm{flux}^{2/3}$. The light curves exhibit strong non-stationarity, in addition to that caused by the rms-flux relation, and are fractionally more variable at lower source flux. The power spectrum is estimated down to $\sim 10^{-7}$ Hz and consists of multiple peaked components: a low-frequency break at $\sim 10^{-5}$ Hz, with slope $\alpha < 1$ down to low frequencies; an additional component breaking at $\sim 10^{-3}$ Hz. Using the high-frequency break we estimate the black hole mass $M_\mathrm{BH} = [0.5-2] \times 10^{6} M_{\odot}$, and mass accretion rate in Eddington units, $\dot m_{\rm Edd} \gtrsim 1$. The non-stationarity is manifest in the PSD with the low-frequency break moving to higher frequencies with decreasing source flux. We also detect a narrow coherent feature in the soft band PSD at $0.7$ mHz, modelled with a Lorentzian the feature has $Q \sim 8$ and an $\mathrm{rms} \sim 3$ %. We discuss the implication of these results for accretion of matter onto black holes.
  • Based on phase-resolved broadband spectroscopy using $XMM$-$Newton$ and $NuSTAR$, we report on a potential cyclotron resonant scattering feature at $E \sim 13$ keV in the pulsed spectrum of the recently discoverd ULX pulsar NGC 300 ULX1. If this interpretation is correct, the implied magnetic field of the central neutron star is $B \sim 10^{12}$ G (assuming scattering off electrons), similar to that estimated from the observed spin-up of the star, and also similar to known Galactic X-ray pulsars. We discuss the implications of this result for the connection between NGC 300 ULX1 and the other known ULX pulsars, particularly in light of the recent discovery of a likely proton Cyclotron line in another ULX, M51 ULX-8.
  • We present a detailed spectral analysis of the recent 1.5\,Ms XMM-Newton observing campaign on the narrow line Seyfert 1 galaxy IRAS~13224$-$3809, taken simultaneously with 500\,ks of NuSTAR data. The X-ray lightcurve shows three flux peaks, registering at about 100 times the minimum flux seen during the campaign, and rapid variability with a time scale of kiloseconds. The spectra are well fit with a primary powerlaw continuum, two relativistic-blurred reflection components from the inner accretion disk with very high iron abundance, and a simple blackbody-shaped model for the remaining soft excess. The spectral variability is dominated by the power law continuum from a corona region within a few gravitational radii from the black hole. Additionally, blueshifted Ne \textsc{x}, Mg \textsc{xii}, Si \textsc{xiv} and S \textsc{xvi} absorption lines are identified in the stacked low-flux spectrum, confirming the presence of a highly ionized outflow with velocity up to $v= 0.267$ and $0.225$\,c. We fit the absorption features with \texttt{xstar} models and find a relatively constant velocity outflow through the whole observation. Finally, we replace the \texttt{bbody} and supersolar abundance reflection models by fitting the soft excess successfully with the extended reflection model \texttt{relxillD}, which allows for higher densities than the standard \texttt{relxill} model. This returns a disk electron density $n_{\rm e}>10^{18.7}$\,cm$^{-3}$ and lowers the iron abundance from $Z_{\rm Fe}=24^{+3}_{-4}Z_\odot$ with $n_{\rm e}\equiv10^{15}$\,cm$^{-3}$ to $Z_{\rm Fe}=6.6^{+0.8}_{-2.1}Z_\odot$.
  • We present the discovery of a diffuse optical emission line halo in the Centaurus cluster seen with the MUSE IFU. The unparalleled sensitivity of MUSE allows us to detect the faint emission from this structure which extends well beyond the bounds of the previously known filaments. This structure is detected in many lines typical of the nebulae in cluster cores ([NII]$_{\lambda 6548\&6583}$ ,[SII]$_{\lambda 6716\&6731}$, [OI]$_{\lambda 6300}$, [OIII]$_{\lambda 4959\&5007}$ etc.) but is more than an order of magnitude fainter than the filaments, so can only be traced to the limits of the data at a radius of ~3.5 kpc with the brightest line in the spectrum ([NII]$_{\lambda 6583}$). The structure is shown to be kinematically distinct from the stars in the central galaxy and potentially the filamentary component of the nebula. Possible origins are discussed and we conclude that the excitation and kinematics of the structure are most consistent with a distinct structure of faint or disrupted filaments dispersed throughout the cluster core, suggesting that the cold gas in these regions is not confined to the bright filamentary structures typically seen.
  • We place constraints on the propagation velocity of bulk turbulence within the intracluster medium of three clusters and an elliptical galaxy. Using Reflection Grating Spectrometer measurements of turbulent line broadening, we show that for these clusters, the 90% upper limit on turbulent velocities when accounting for instrumental broadening is too low to propagate energy radially to the cooling radius of the clusters within the required cooling time. In this way, we extend previous Hitomi-based analysis on the Perseus cluster to more clusters, with the intention of applying these results to a future, more extensive catalog. These results constrain models of turbulent heating in AGN feedback by requiring a mechanism which can not only provide sufficient energy to offset radiative cooling, but resupply that energy rapidly enough to balance cooling at each cluster radius.
  • We present broadband X-ray analyses of a sample of bright ultraluminous X-ray sources with the goal of investigating the spectral similarity of this population to the known ULX pulsars, M82 X-2, NGC7793 P13 and NGC5907 ULX. We perform a phase-resolved analysis of the broadband XMM-Newton+NuSTAR dataset of NGC5907 ULX, finding that the pulsed emission from the accretion column in this source exhibits a similar spectral shape to that seen in both M82 X-2 and NGC7793 P13, and that this is responsible for the excess emission observed at the highest energies when the spectra are fit with accretion disk models. We then demonstrate that similar 'hard' excesses are seen in all the ULXs in the broadband sample. Finally, for the ULXs where the nature of the accretor is currently unknown, we test whether the hard excesses are all consistent with being produced by an accretion column similar to those present in M82 X-2, NGC7793 P13 and NGC5907 ULX. Based on the average shape of the pulsed emission, we find that in all cases a similar accretion column can successfully reproduce the observed data, consistent with the hypothesis that this ULX sample may be dominated by neutron star accretors. Compared to the known pulsar ULXs, our spectral fits for the remaining ULXs suggest that the non-pulsed emission from the accretion flow beyond the magnetosphere makes a stronger relative contribution than the component associated with the accretion column. If these sources do also contain neutron star accretors, this may help to explain the lack of detected pulsations.
  • Ultraluminous pulsars are a definite proof that persistent super-Eddington accretion occurs in nature. They support the scenario according to which most Ultraluminous X-ray Sources (ULXs) are super-Eddington accretors of stellar mass rather than sub-Eddington intermediate mass black holes. An important prediction of theories of supercritical accretion is the existence of powerful outflows of moderately ionized gas at mildly relativistic speeds. In practice, the spectral resolution of X-ray gratings such as RGS onboard XMM-Newton is required to resolve their observational signatures in ULXs. Using RGS, outflows have been discovered in the spectra of 3 ULXs (none of which are currently known to be pulsars). Most recently, the fourth ultraluminous pulsar was discovered in NGC 300. Here we report detection of an ultrafast outflow (UFO) in the X-ray spectrum of the object, with a significance of at least 3{\sigma}, during one of the two simultaneous observations of the source by XMM-Newton and NuSTAR in December 2016. The outflow has a projected velocity of about 72000 km/s (0.24c) and a high ionisation factor with a log value of 3.9. This is the first time a detection of an ultrafast wind in a ULX was achieved using both soft and hard X-ray data simultaneously, and it is also the first detection of a UFO in a neutron star ULX. We find no evidence of the UFO during the other observation of the object, which could be explained by either clumpy nature of the absorber or a slight change in our viewing angle of the accretion flow.
  • We have produced for the first time a detailed velocity map of the giant filamentary nebula surrounding NGC 1275, the Perseus cluster's brightest galaxy, and revealed a previously unknown rich velocity structure across the entire nebula. We present new observations of the low-velocity component of this nebula with the optical imaging Fourier transform spectrometer SITELLE at CFHT. With its wide field of view ($\sim$11'$\times$11'), SITELLE is the only integral field unit spectroscopy instrument able to cover the 80 kpc$\times$55 kpc (3.8'$\times$2.6') large nebula in NGC 1275. Our analysis of these observations shows a smooth radial gradient of the [N II]$\lambda$6583/$\text{H} \alpha$ line ratio, suggesting a change in the ionization mechanism and source across the nebula, while the dispersion profile shows a general decrease with increasing distance from the AGN at up to $\sim 10$ kpc. The velocity map shows no visible general trend or rotation, indicating that filaments are not falling uniformly onto the galaxy, nor being pulled out from it. Comparison between the physical properties of the filaments and Hitomi measurements of the X-ray gas dynamics in Perseus are also explored.
  • The increasing observational evidence of galactic outflows is considered as a sign of active galactic nucleus (AGN) feedback in action. However, the physical mechanism responsible for driving the observed outflows remains unclear, and whether it is due to momentum, energy, or radiation is still a matter of debate. The observed outflow energetics, in particular the large measured values of the momentum ratio ($\dot{p}/(L/c) \sim 10$) and energy ratio ($\dot{E}_k/L \sim 0.05$), seems to favour the energy-driving mechanism; and most observational works have focused their comparison with wind energy-driven models. Here we show that AGN radiation pressure on dust can adequately reproduce the observed outflow energetics (mass outflow rate, momentum flux, and kinetic power), as well as the scalings with luminosity, provided that the effects of radiation trapping are properly taken into account. In particular, we predict a sub-linear scaling for the mass outflow rate ($\dot{M} \propto L^{1/2}$) and a super-linear scaling for the kinetic power ($\dot{E}_k \propto L^{3/2}$), in agreement with the observational scaling relations reported in the most recent compilation of AGN outflow data. We conclude that AGN radiative feedback can account for the global outflow energetics, at least equally well as the wind energy-driving mechanism, and therefore both physical models should be considered in the interpretation of future AGN outflow observations.
  • We present results from the optical, ultraviolet and X-ray monitoring of the NLS1 galaxy IRAS 13224-3809 taken with Swift and XMM-Newton during 2016. IRAS 13224-3809 is the most variable bright AGN in the X-ray sky and shows strong X-ray reflection, implying that the X-rays strongly illuminate the inner disc. Therefore, it is a good candidate to study the relationship between coronal X-ray and disc UV emission. However, we find no correlation between the X-ray and UV flux over the available ~40 day monitoring, despite the presence of strong X-ray variability and the variable part of the UV spectrum being consistent with irradiation of a standard thin disc. This means either that the X-ray flux which irradiates the UV emitting outer disc does not correlate with the X-ray flux in our line of sight and/or that another process drives the majority of the UV variability. The former case may be due to changes in coronal geometry, absorption or scattering between the corona and the disc.
  • Abell 2146 ($z=0.232$) is a massive galaxy cluster currently undergoing a spectacular merger in the plane of the sky with a bullet-like morphology. It was the first system in which both the bow and upstream shock fronts were detected at X-ray wavelengths (Mach$\sim2$), yet deep GMRT 325 MHz observations failed to detect extended radio emission associated with the cluster as is typically seen in such systems. We present new, multi-configuration $1-2$ GHz Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) observations of Abell 2146 totalling 16 hours of observations. These data reveal for the first time the presence of an extended ($\approx850$ kpc), faint radio structure associated with Abell 2146. The structure appears to harbour multiple components, one associated with the upstream shock which we classify as a radio relic and one associated with the subcluster core which is consisted as being a radio halo bounded by the bow shock. The newly detected structures have some of the lowest radio powers detected thus far in any cluster ($P_{\rm 1.4 GHz, halo}=2.4\pm0.2\times10^{23}$ W Hz$^{-1}$ and $P_{\rm 1.4 GHz, relic}=2.2\pm0.2\times10^{23}$ W Hz$^{-1}$). The flux measurement of the halo, as well as its morphology, also suggest that the halo was recently created ($\approx0.3$ Gyr after core passage), consistent with the dynamical state of the cluster. These observations demonstrate the capacity of the upgraded VLA to detect extremely faint and extended radio structures. Based on these observations, we predict that many more radio relics and radio halos in merging clusters should be detected by future radio facilities such as the Square Kilometre Array (SKA).
  • The presence of neutron stars in at least three ultraluminous X-ray sources is now firmly established and offers an unambiguous view of super-critical accretion. All three systems show long-timescale periods (60-80 days) in the X-rays and/or optical, two of which are known to be super-orbital in nature. Should the flow be classically super critical, i.e. the Eddington limit is reached locally in the disc (implying surface dipole fields that are sub-magnetar in strength), then the large scale-height flow can precess through the Lense-Thirring effect which could provide an explanation for the observed super-orbital periods. By connecting the details of the Lense-Thirring effect with the observed pulsar spin period, we are able to infer the moment-of-inertia and therefore equation-of-state of the neutron star without relying on the inclination of, or distance to the system. We apply our technique to the case of NGC 7793 P13 and demonstrate that stronger magnetic fields imply stiffer equations of state. We discuss the caveats and uncertainties, many of which can be addressed through forthcoming radiative magnetohydrodynamic (RMHD) simulations and their connection to observation.
  • We analyse a long archival XMM-Newton observation of the narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxy Ton S180, using the latest reflection models to explore the high quality X-ray spectrum. We find that the iron line is relatively narrow and sharp, and the soft excess is extremely smooth. We cannot find an acceptable reflection model that describes both components, and conclude that the soft excess cannot be produced by relativistic reflection. Fitting the 3-10 keV band with relativistic reflection to model the iron line strongly prefers low spin values (< 0.4), with the exact value depending on the model and not well constrained. We then model the broad- band spectrum with a two-component Comptonization continuum plus relativistic reflection. This gives a much better fit than a pure reflection model, which again prefers a low spin value. The photon index of the reflection component is intermediate between the two Comptoniza- tion components, suggesting that both illuminate the disk a similar amount and therefore both contribute to the reflection.
  • Ultraluminous X-ray sources are non-nuclear point sources exceeding the Eddington luminosity of a 10 Solar mass black hole. Modern consensus for a majority of the ULX population is that they are powered by stellar-mass black holes or neutron stars accreting well above the Eddington limit. Theoretical models of super-Eddington accretion predict existence of powerful outflows of moderately ionised gas at mildly relativistic velocities. So far, these winds have been found in 3 systems: NGC 1313 X-1, NGC 5408 X-1, NGC 55 ULX. In this work, we create a sample of all ULXs with usable archival high resolution X-ray data, with 10 sources in total, in which we aim to find more signatures of outflows. We perform Gaussian line scans to find any narrow spectral signatures, and physical wind model scans where possible. We tentatively identify an outflow in NGC 5204 X-1, blueshifted to 0.34c, which produces emission features with a total significance of at least 3$\sigma$. Next we compare ULXs with similar hardness ratios. Holmberg IX X-1 shows absorption features which could be associated with a photoionized outflowing absorber, similar to that seen in NGC 1313 X-1. The spectrum of Holmberg II X-1 possesses features similar to NGC 5408 X-1 and NGC 6946 X-1 shows O VIII rest-frame emission. All other sources from the sample also show tentative evidence of spectral features in their high resolution spectra. Further observations with the XMM-Newton and Chandra gratings will place stronger constraints. Future missions like XARM and Athena will be able to detect them at larger distances and increase our sample.
  • We present ALMA Cycle 4 observations of CO(1-0), CO(3-2), and $^{13}$CO(3-2) line emission in the brightest cluster galaxy of RXJ0821+0752. This is one of the first detections of $^{13}$CO line emission in a galaxy cluster. Half of the CO(3-2) line emission originates from two clumps of molecular gas that are spatially offset from the galactic center. These clumps are surrounded by diffuse emission that extends $8~{\rm kpc}$ in length. The detected $^{13}$CO emission is confined entirely to the two bright clumps, with any emission outside of this region lying below our detection threshold. Two distinct velocity components with similar integrated fluxes are detected in the $^{12}$CO spectra. The narrower component ($60~{\rm km}~{\rm s}^{-1}$ FWHM) is consistent in both velocity centroid and linewidth with $^{13}$CO(3-2) emission, while the broader ($130-160~{\rm km}~{\rm s}^{-1}$), slightly blueshifted wing has no associated $^{13}$CO(3-2) emission. A simple local thermodynamic model indicates that the $^{13}$CO emission traces $2.1\times 10^{9}~{\rm M}_\odot$ of molecular gas. Isolating the $^{12}$CO velocity component that accompanies the $^{13}$CO emission yields a CO-to-H$_2$ conversion factor of $\alpha_{\rm CO}=2.3~{\rm M}_{\odot}~({\rm K~km~s^{-1}})^{-1}$, which is a factor of two lower than the Galactic value. Adopting the Galactic CO-to-H$_2$ conversion factor in brightest cluster galaxies may therefore overestimate their molecular gas masses by a factor of two. This is within the object-to-object scatter from extragalactic sources, so calibrations in a larger sample of clusters are necessary in order to confirm a sub-Galactic conversion factor.
  • Recent observations confirm the existence of ultra-massive black holes (UMBH) in the nuclei of compact galaxies, with physical properties similar to NGC 1277. The nature of these objects poses a new puzzle to the `black hole-host galaxy co-evolution' scenario. We discuss the potential link between UMBH and galaxy compactness, possibly connected via extreme active galactic nucleus (AGN) feedback at early times ($z > 2$). In our picture, AGN feedback is driven by radiation pressure on dust. We suggest that early UMBH feedback blows away all the gas beyond a $\sim$kpc or so, while triggering star formation at inner radii, eventually leaving a compact galaxy remnant. Such extreme UMBH feedback can also affect the surrounding environment on larger scales, e.g. the outflowing stars may form a diffuse stellar halo around the compact galaxy, or even escape into the intergalactic or intracluster medium. On the other hand, less massive black holes will drive less powerful feedback, such that the stars formed within the AGN feedback-driven outflow remain bound to the host galaxy, and contribute to its size growth over cosmic time.
  • We present new ALMA observations tracing the morphology and velocity structure of the molecular gas in the central galaxy of the cluster Abell 1795. The molecular gas lies in two filaments that extend 5 - 7 kpc to the N and S from the nucleus and project exclusively around the outer edges of two inner radio bubbles. Radio jets launched by the central AGN have inflated bubbles filled with relativistic plasma into the hot atmosphere surrounding the central galaxy. The N filament has a smoothly increasing velocity gradient along its length from the central galaxy's systemic velocity at the nucleus to -370 km/s, the average velocity of the surrounding galaxies, at the furthest extent. The S filament has a similarly smooth but shallower velocity gradient and appears to have partially collapsed in a burst of star formation. The close spatial association with the radio lobes, together with the ordered velocity gradients and narrow velocity dispersions, show that the molecular filaments are gas flows entrained by the expanding radio bubbles. Assuming a Galactic $X_{\mathrm{CO}}$ factor, the total molecular gas mass is $3.2\pm0.2\times10^{9}$M$_{\odot}$. More than half lies above the N radio bubble. Lifting the molecular clouds appears to require an infeasibly efficient coupling between the molecular gas and the radio bubble. The energy required also exceeds the mechanical power of the N radio bubble by a factor of two. Stimulated feedback, where the radio bubbles lift low entropy X-ray gas that becomes thermally unstable and rapidly cools in situ, provides a plausible model. Multiple generations of radio bubbles are required to lift this substantial gas mass. The close morphological association then indicates that the cold gas either moulds the newly expanding bubbles or is itself pushed aside and shaped as they inflate.
  • X-ray reverberation lags from the vicinity of supermassive black holes have been detected in almost 30 AGN. The soft lag, which is the time delay between the hard and soft X-ray light curves, is usually interpreted as the time difference between the direct and reflected emission, but is alternatively suggested to arise from the direct and scattering emission from distant clouds. By analysing the archival Suzaku observations totalling an exposure time of ~ 770 ks, we discover a soft lag of $10\pm3.4$ ks at $9.58\times10^{-6}$ Hz in the luminous quasar PDS 456, which is the longest soft lag and lowest Fourier frequency reported to date. In this study, we use the maximum likelihood method to deal with non-continuous nature of the Suzaku light curves. The result follows the mass-scaling relation for soft lags, which further supports that soft lags originate from the innermost areas of AGN and hence are best interpreted by the reflection scenario. Spectral analysis has been performed in this work and we find no evidence of clumpy partial-covering absorbers. The spectrum can be explained by a self-consistent relativistic reflection model with warm absorbers, and spectral variations over epochs can be accounted for by the change of the continuum, and of column density and ionization states of the warm absorbers.
  • We present a low-frequency view of the Perseus cluster with new observations from the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (JVLA) at 230-470 MHz. The data reveal a multitude of new structures associated with the mini-halo. The mini-halo seems to be influenced both by the AGN activity as well as by the sloshing motion of the cool core cluster's gas. In addition, it has a filamentary structure similar to that seen in radio relics found in merging clusters. We present a detailed description of the data reduction and imaging process of the dataset. The depth and resolution of the observations allow us to conduct for the first time a detailed comparison of the mini-halo structure with the X-ray structure as seen in the Chandra X-ray images. The resulting image shows very clearly that the mini-halo emission is mostly contained behind the cold fronts, similar to that predicted by simulations of gas sloshing in galaxy clusters. However, due to the proximity of the Perseus cluster, as well as the quality of the data at low radio frequencies and at X-ray wavelengths, we also find evidence of fine structure. This structure includes several radial radio filaments extending in different directions, a concave radio structure associated with the southern X-ray bay and sharp edges that correlate with X-ray edges. Mini-halos are therefore not simply diffuse, uniform radio sources, but are rather filled with a rich variety of complex structures. These results illustrate the high-quality images that can be obtained with the new JVLA at low radio-frequencies, as well as the necessity to obtain deeper, higher-fidelity radio images of mini-halos and halos in clusters to further understand their origin.
  • We present results from a coordinated $XMM$-$Newton$+$NuSTAR$ observation of the type 1.8 Seyfert galaxy IRAS 13197-1627. This is a highly complex source, with strong contributions from relativistic reflection from the inner accretion disk, neutral absorption and further reprocessing by more distant material, and ionised absorption from an outflow. We undertake a detailed spectral analysis combining the broadband coverage provided by $XMM$-$Newton$+$NuSTAR$ with a multi-epoch approach incorporating archival observations performed by $XMM$-$Newton$ and $Suzaku$. Our focus is on characterising the reflection from the inner accretion disk, which previous works have suggested may dominate the AGN emission, and constraining the black hole spin. Using lamppost disk reflection models, we find that the results for the inner disk are largely insensitive to assumptions regarding the geometry of the distant reprocessor and the precise form of the illuminating X-ray continuum. However, these results do depend on the treatment of the iron abundance of the distant absorber/reprocessor. The multi-epoch data favour a scenario in which the AGN is chemically homogeneous, and we find that a rapidly rotating black hole is preferred, with $a^* \geq 0.7$, but a slowly-rotating black hole is not strongly excluded. In addition to the results for the inner disk, we also find that both the neutral and ionised absorbers vary from epoch to epoch, implying that both have some degree of inhomogeneity in their structure.
  • We present a detailed, broadband X-ray spectral analysis of the ULX pulsar NGC 7793 P13, a known super-Eddington source, utilizing data from the $XMM$-$Newton$, $NuSTAR$ and $Chandra$ observatories. The broadband $XMM$-$Newton+NuSTAR$ spectrum of P13 is qualitatively similar to the rest of the ULX sample with broadband coverage, suggesting that additional ULXs in the known population may host neutron star accretors. Through time-averaged, phase-resolved and multi-epoch studies, we find that two non-pulsed thermal blackbody components with temperatures $\sim$0.5 and $\sim$1.5 keV are required to fit the data below 10 keV, in addition to a third continuum component which extends to higher energies and is associated with the pulsed emission from the accretion column. The characteristic radii of the thermal components appear to be similar, and are too large to be associated with the neutron star itself, so the need for two components likely indicates the accretion flow outside the magnetosphere is complex. We suggest a scenario in which the thick inner disc expected for super-Eddington accretion begins to form, but is terminated by the neutron star's magnetic field soon after its onset, implying a magnetic field of $B \lesssim 6 \times 10^{12}$ G for the central neutron star. Evidence of similar termination of the disc in other sources may offer a further means of identifying additional neutron star ULXs. Finally, we examine the spectrum exhibited by P13 during one of its unusual 'off' states. These data require both a hard powerlaw component, suggesting residual accretion onto the neutron star, and emission from a thermal plasma, which we argue is likely associated with the P13 system.
  • Ark 564 is an archetypal Narrow line Seyfert 1 that has been well observed in soft X-rays from 0.3-10 keV, revealing a steep spectrum, strong soft excess, iron K emission line and dramatic variability on the order of hours. Because of its very steep spectrum, observations of the source above 10 keV have been sparse. We report here on the first NuSTAR observation of Ark 564. The source was observed for 200 ks with NuSTAR, 50 ks of which were concurrent with Suzaku observations. NuSTAR and Suzaku observed a dramatic flare, in which the hard emission is clearly delayed with respect to the soft emission, consistent with previous detections of a low-frequency hard lag found in XMM-Newton data. The NuSTAR spectrum is well described by a low-temperature Comptonisation continuum (with an electron temperature of 15 +/- 2 keV), which irradiates a highly ionised disc. No further relativistic broadening or ionized absorption is required. These spectral results show that Ark 564 has one of the lowest temperature coronae observed by NuSTAR to date. We discuss possible reasons for low-temperature coronae in high-Eddington sources.
  • We present results from four new broadband X-ray observations of the extreme ultraluminous X-ray source Holmberg IX X-1 ($L_{\rm{X}} > 10^{40}$ erg/s), performed by $Suzaku$ and $NuSTAR$ in coordination. Combined with the archival data, we now have broadband observations of this remarkable source from six separate epochs. Two of these new observations probe lower fluxes than seen previously, allowing us to extend our knowledge of the broadband spectral variability exhibited. The spectra are well fit by two thermal blackbody components, which dominate the emission below 10 keV, as well as a steep ($\Gamma \sim 3.5$) powerlaw tail which dominates above $\sim$15 keV. Remarkably, while the 0.3-10.0 keV flux varies by a factor of $\sim$3 between all these epochs, the 15-40 keV flux varies by only $\sim$20%. Although the spectral variability is strongest in the $\sim$1-10 keV band, both of the thermal components are required to vary when all epochs are considered. We also re-visit the search for iron absorption features, leveraging the high-energy $NuSTAR$ data to improve our sensitivity to extreme velocity outflows in light of the ultra-fast outflow recently detected in NGC 1313 X-1. Iron absorption from a similar outflow along our line of sight can be ruled out in this case. We discuss these results in the context of super-Eddington accretion models that invoke a funnel-like geometry for the inner flow, and propose a scenario in which we have an almost face-on view of a funnel that expands to larger radii with increasing flux, resulting in an increasing degree of geometrical collimation for the emission from intermediate temperature regions.
  • We present first results from a series of $NuSTAR$ observations of the black hole X-ray binary V404 Cyg obtained during its summer 2015 outburst, primarily focusing on observations during the height of this outburst activity. The $NuSTAR$ data show extreme variability in both the flux and spectral properties of the source. This is partly driven by strong and variable line-of-sight absorption, similar to previous outbursts. The latter stages of this observation are dominated by strong flares, reaching luminosities close to Eddington. During these flares, the central source appears to be relatively unobscured and the data show clear evidence for a strong contribution from relativistic reflection, providing a means to probe the geometry of the innermost accretion flow. Based on the flare properties, analogy with other Galactic black hole binaries, and also the simultaneous onset of radio activity, we argue that this intense X-ray flaring is related to transient jet activity during which the ejected plasma is the primary source of illumination for the accretion disk. If this is the case, then our reflection modelling implies that these jets are launched in close proximity to the black hole (as close as a few gravitational radii), consistent with expectations for jet launching models that tap either the spin of the central black hole, or the very innermost accretion disk. Our analysis also allows us to place the first constraints on the black hole spin for this source, which we find to be $a^* > 0.92$ (99% statistical uncertainty, based on an idealized lamppost geometry).