• One of the most controversial hypotheses for explaining the heterogeneous dynamics of glasses postulates the temporary coexistence of two phases characterized by a high and by a low diffusivity. In this scenario, two phases with different diffusivities coexist for a time of the order of the relaxation time and mix afterwards. Unfortunately, it is difficult to measure the single-particle diffusivities to test this hypothesis. Indeed, although the non-Gaussian shape of the van-Hove distribution suggests the transient existence of a diffusivity distribution, it is not possible to infer from this quantity whether two or more dynamical phases coexist. Here we provide the first direct observation of the dynamical coexistence of two phases with different diffusivities, by showing that in the deeply supercooled regime the distribution of the single-particle diffusivities acquires a transient bimodal shape. We relate this distribution to the heterogeneity of the dynamics and to the breakdown of the Stokes-Einstein relation, and we show that the coexistence of two dynamical phases occurs up to a timescale growing faster than the relaxation time on cooling, for some of the considered models. Our work offers a basis for rationalizing the dynamics of supercooled liquids and for relating their structural and dynamical properties.
  • The non-equilibrium transition from a fluid-like state to a disordered solid-like state, known as the jamming transition, occurs in a wide variety of physical systems, such as colloidal suspensions and molecular fluids, when the temperature is lowered or the density increased. Shear stress, as temperature, favors the fluid-like state, and must be also considered to define the system 'jamming phase diagram' [1-4]. Frictionless athermal systems [1], for instance, can be described by the zero temperature plane of the jamming diagram in the temperature, density, stress space. Here we consider the jamming of athermal frictional systems [8-13] such as granular materials, which are important to a number of applications from geophysics to industry. At constant volume and applied shear stress[1, 2], we show that while in absence of friction a system is either fluid-like or jammed, in the presence of friction a new region in the density shear-stress plane appears, where new dynamical regimes are found. In this region a system may slip, or even flow with a steady velocity for a long time in response to an applied stress, but then eventually jams. Jamming in non-thermal frictional systems is described here by a phase diagram in the density, shear-stress and friction space.
  • A theoretical and numerically study of dynamical properties in the sol-gel transition is presented. In particular, the complex phenomenology observed experimentally and numerically in gelling systems is reproduced in the framework of percolation theory, under simple assumptions on the relaxation of single clusters. By neglecting the correlation between particles belonging to different clusters, the quantities of interest (such as the self intermediate scattering function, the dynamical susceptibility, the Van-Hove function, and the non-Gaussian parameter) are written as superposition of those due to single clusters. Connection between these behaviors and the critical exponents of percolation are given. The theoretical predictions are checked in a model for permanent gels, where bonds between monomers are described by a finitely extendable nonlinear elastic potential. The data obtained in the numerical simulations are in good agreement with the analytical predictions.
  • We study the dynamical behavior of a lattice model of glass former on a random graph, where no corrections to the mean field description are expected. We find that the behavior of dynamical correlation functions and dynamical susceptibility are consistent with the quantitative predictions of the Mode Coupling Theory of the glass transition.
  • We present a theoretical study of a system with competing short-range ferromagnetic attraction and a long-range anti-ferromagnetic repulsion, in the presence of a uniform external magnetic field. The interplay between these interactions, at sufficiently low temperature, leads to the self-tuning of the magnetization to a value which triggers phase coexistence, even in the presence of the external field. The investigation of this phenomenon is performed using a Ginzburg-Landau functional in the limit of an infinite number of order parameter components (large $N$ model). The scalar version of the model is expected to describe the phase separation taking place on a cell surface when this is immersed in a uniform concentration of chemical stimulant. A phase diagram is obtained as function of the external field and the intensity of the long-range repulsion. The time evolution of order parameter and of the structure factor in a relaxation process are studied in different regions of the phase diagram.
  • We present a systematic study of dynamical heterogeneity in a model for permanent gels, upon approaching the gelation threshold. We find that the fluctuations of the self intermediate scattering function are increasing functions of time, reaching a plateau whose value, at large length scales, coincides with the mean cluster size and diverges at the percolation threshold. Another measure of dynamical heterogeneities, i.e. the fluctuations of the self-overlap, displays instead a peak and decays to zero at long times. The peak, however, also scales as the mean cluster size. Arguments are given for this difference in the long time behavior. We also find that non-Gaussian parameter reaches a plateau in the long time limit. The value of the plateau of the non-Gaussian parameter, which is connected to the fluctuations of diffusivity of clusters, increases with the volume fraction and remains finite at percolation threshold.
  • We study the formation of a colloidal gel by means of Molecular Dynamics simulations of a model for colloidal suspensions. A slowing down with gel-like features is observed at low temperatures and low volume fractions, due to the formation of persistent structures. We show that at low volume fraction the dynamic susceptibility, which describes dynamic heterogeneities, exhibits a large plateau, dominated by clusters of long living bonds. At higher volume fraction, where the effect of the crowding of the particles starts to be present, it crosses over towards a regime characterized by a peak. We introduce a suitable mean cluster size of clusters of monomers connected by "persistent" bonds which well describes the dynamic susceptibility.
  • We compare the slow dynamics of irreversible gels, colloidal gels, glasses and spin glasses by analyzing the behavior of the so called non-linear dynamical susceptibility, a quantity usually introduced to quantitatively characterize the dynamical heterogeneities. In glasses this quantity typically grows with the time, reaches a maximum and then decreases at large time, due to the transient nature of dynamical heterogeneities and to the absence of a diverging static correlation length. We have recently shown that in irreversible gels the dynamical susceptibility is instead an increasing function of the time, as in the case of spin glasses, and tends asymptotically to the mean cluster size. On the basis of molecular dynamics simulations, we here show that in colloidal gelation where clusters are not permanent, at very low temperature and volume fractions, i.e. when the lifetime of the bonds is much larger than the structural relaxation time, the non-linear susceptibility has a behavior similar to the one of the irreversible gel, followed, at higher volume fractions, by a crossover towards the behavior of glass forming liquids.
  • In chemical crosslinking of gelatin solutions, two different time scales affect the kinetics of the gel formation in the experiments. We complement the experimental study with Monte Carlo numerical simulations of a lattice model. This approach shows that the two characteristic time scales are related to the formation of single bonds crosslinker-chain and of bridges between chains. In particular their ratio turns out to control the kinetics of the gel formation. We discuss the effect of the concentration of chains. Finally our results suggest that, by varying the probability of forming bridges as an independent parameter, one can finely tune the kinetics of the gelation via the ratio of the two characteristic times.
  • In colloidal suspensions, the competition between attractive and repulsive interactions gives rise to a rich and complex phenomenology. Here, we study the equilibrium phase diagram of a model system using a DLVO interaction potential by means of molecular dynamics simulations and a thermodynamical approach. As a result, we find tubular and lamellar phases at low volume fraction. Such phases, extremely relevant for designing new materials, may be not easily observed in the experiments because of the long relaxation times and the presence of defects.
  • We study the structure and the dynamics in the formation of irreversible gels by means of molecular dynamics simulation of a model system where the gelation transition is due to the random percolation of permanent bonds between neighboring particles. We analyze the heterogeneities of the dynamics in terms of the fluctuations of the intermediate scattering functions: In the sol phase close to the percolation threshold, we find that this dynamical susceptibility increases with the time until it reaches a plateau. At the gelation threshold this plateau scales as a function of the wave vector $k$ as $k^{\eta -2}$, with $\eta$ being related to the decay of the percolation pair connectedness function. At the lowest wave vector, approaching the gelation threshold it diverges with the same exponent $\gamma$ as the mean cluster size. These findings suggest an alternative way of measuring critical exponents in a system undergoing chemical gelation.
  • We study analytically the structural properties of a system with a short-range attraction and a competing long-range screened repulsion. This model contains the essential features of the effective interaction potential among charged colloids in polymeric solutions and provides novel insights on the equilibrium phase diagram of these systems. Within the self-consistent Hartree approximation and by using a replica approach, we show that varying the parameters of the repulsive potential and the temperature yields a phase coexistence, a lamellar and a glassy phase. Our results strongly suggest that the cluster phase observed in charged colloids might be the signature of an underlying equilibrium lamellar phase, hidden on experimental time scales.
  • We present extensive Molecular Dynamics simulations on species segregation in a granular mixture subject to vertical taps. We discuss how grain properties, e.g., size, density, friction, as well as, shaking properties, e.g., amplitude and frequency, affect such a phenomenon. Both Brazil Nut Effect (larger particles on the top, BN) and the Reverse Brazil Nut Effect (larger particles on the bottom, RBN) are found and we derive the system comprehensive ``segregation diagram'' and the BN to RBN crossover line. We also discuss the role of friction and show that particles which differ only for their frictional properties segregate in states depending on the tapping acceleration and frequency.
  • We propose a new model of cluster growth according to which the probability that a new unit is placed in a point at a distance $r$ from the city center is a Gaussian with mean equal to the cluster radius and variance proportional to the mean, modulated by the local density $\rho(r)$. The model is analytically solvable in $d=2$ dimensions, where the density profile varies as a complementary error function. The model reproduces experimental observations relative to the morphology of cities, determined via an original analysis of digital maps with a very high spatial resolution, and helps understanding the emergence of vehicular traffic.
  • By means of molecular dynamics, we study a model system for colloidal suspensions where the interaction is based on a competition between attraction and repulsion. At low temperatures the relaxation time $\tau$ first increases as a power law as a function of the volume fraction $\phi$ and then, due to the finite lifetime of the bonded structures, it deviates from this critical behavior. We show that colloidal gelation at low temperatures and low volume fractions is crucially related to the formation of spanning long living cluster. Besides agreeing with experimental findings in different colloidal systems, our results shed new light on the different role played by the formation of long living bonds and the crowding of the particles in colloidal structural arrest.
  • In order to study analytically the nature of the size segregation in granular mixtures, we introduce a mean field theory in the framework of a statistical mechanics approach, based on Edwards' original ideas. For simplicity we apply the theory to a lattice model for hard sphere binary mixture under gravity, and we find a new purely thermodynamic mechanism which gives rise to the size segregation phenomenon. By varying the number of small grains and the mass ratio, we find a crossover from Brasil nut to reverse Brasil nut effect, which becomes a true phase transition when the number of small grains is larger then a critical value. We suggest that this transition is induced by the effective attraction between large grains due to the presence of small ones (depletion force). Finally the theoretical results are confirmed by numerical simulations of the 3d system under taps.
  • In order to study analytically the nature of the jamming transition in granular material, we have considered a cavity method mean field theory, in the framework of a statistical mechanics approach, based on Edwards' original idea. For simplicity we have applied the theory to a lattice model and a transition with exactly the same nature of the glass transition in mean field models for usual glass formers is found. The model is also simulated in three dimensions under tap dynamics and a jamming transition with glassy features is observed. In particular two step decays appear in the relaxation functions and dynamic heterogeneities resembling ones usually observed in glassy systems. These results confirm early speculations about the connection between the jamming transition in granular media and the glass transition in usual glass formers, giving moreover a precise interpretation of its nature.
  • We discuss mixing/segregation phenomena in a schematic hard spheres lattice model for binary mixtures of granular media, by analytical evaluation, within Bethe-Peierls approximation, of Edwards' partition function. The presence of fluid-crystal phase transitions in the system drives segregation as a form of phase separation. Within a pure phase, gravity can also induce a kind of vertical segregation not associated to phase transitions.
  • In the framework of schematic hard spheres lattice models for granular media we investigate the phenomenon of the ``jamming transition''. In particular, using Edwards' approach, by analytical calculations at a mean field level, we derive the system phase diagram and show that ``jamming'' corresponds to a phase transition from a ``fluid'' to a ``glassy'' phase, observed when crystallization is avoided. Interestingly, the nature of such a ``glassy'' phase turns out to be the same found in mean field models for glass formers.
  • We study a model for the gel degradation by an enzyme, where the gel is schematized as a cubic lattice, and the enzyme as a random walker, that cuts the bonds over which it passes. The model undergoes a (reverse) percolation transition, which for low density of enzymes falls in a universality class different from random percolation. In particular we have measured a gel fraction critical exponent beta=1.0+-0.1, in excellent agreement with experiments made on the real system.
  • We here discuss the results of 3d MonteCarlo simulations of a minimal lattice model for gelling systems. We focus on the dynamics, investigated by means of the time autocorrelation function of the density fluctuations and the particle mean square displacement. We start from the case of chemical gelation, i.e. with permanent bonds, we characterize the critical dynamics as determined by the formation of the percolating cluster, as actually observed in polymer gels. By opportunely introducing a finite bond life time $\tau_b$ the dynamics displays relevant changes and eventually the onset of a glassy regime. This has been interpreted in terms of a crossover to dynamics more typical of colloidal systems and a novel connection between classical gelation and recent results on colloidal systems is suggested. By systematically comparing the results in the case of permanent bonds to finite bond lifetime, the crossover and the glassy regime can be understood in terms of effective clusters.
  • In the framework of schematic hard spheres lattice models we discuss Edwards' Statistical Mechanics approach to granular media. As this approach appears to hold here to a very good approximation, by analytical calculations of Edwards' partition function at a mean field level we derive the system phase diagram and show that ``jamming'' corresponds to a phase transition from a ``fluid'' to a ``glassy'' phase, observed when crystallization is avoided. The nature of such a ``glassy'' phase turns out to be the same found in mean field models for glass formers. In the same context, we also briefly discuss mixing/segregation phenomena of binary mixtures: the presence of fluid-crystal phase transitions drives segregation as a form of phase separation and, within a given phase, gravity can also induce a kind of ``vertical'' segregation, usually not associated to phase transitions.
  • We study the equilibrium and dynamical properties of a spherical version of the frustrated Blume-Emery-Griffiths model at mean field level for attractive particle-particle coupling (K>0). Beyond a second order transition line from a paramagnetic to a (replica symmetric) spin glass phase, the density-temperature phase diagram is characterized by a tricritical point from which, interestingly, a first order transition line starts with coexistence of the two phases. In the Langevin dynamics the paramagnetic/spin glass discontinuous transition line is found to be dependent on the initial density; close to this line, on the paramagnetic side, the correlation-response plot displays interrupted aging.
  • The number of spanning clusters in four to nine dimensions does not fully follow the expected size dependence for random percolation.
  • We investigate the slow dynamics in gelling systems by means of MonteCarlo simulations on the cubic lattice of a minimal statistical mechanics model. By opportunely varying some model parameter we are able to describe a crossover from the chemical gelation behaviour to dynamics more typical of colloidal systems. The results suggest a novel connection linking classical gelation, as originally described by Flory, to more recent results on colloidal systems.