• We report on the depletion and power amplification of the driving laser pulse in a strongly-driven laser wakefield accelerator. Simultaneous measurement of the transmitted pulse energy and temporal shape indicate an increase in peak power from $187 \pm 11$ TW to a maximum of $318 \pm 12$ TW after 13 mm of propagation in plasma density of $0.9 \times 10^{18}$ cm$^{-3}$. The power amplification is correlated with the injection and acceleration of electrons in the nonlinear wakefield. This process is modeled by including localized redshift and subsequent group delay dispersion at the laser pulse front.
  • Ultrafast pump-probe experiments open the possibility to track fundamental material behavior like changes in its electronic configuration in real time. So far, such measurements have widely relied on high harmonic generation (HHG) with ultrashort laser pulses, limiting the achievable wavelength range to the extreme ultraviolet regime. However, to directly excite site-specific core states of molecules or more complex systems, photon energies in the water window and above are required. Novel light sources based on laser-driven electron accelerators have demonstrated bright radiation production over a wide energy range. Given the phase space of the electron bunches could be shaped in an adequate way, these sources would also be suitable for high-energy ultrafast pump-probe experimentation. Here, we report for the first time on the simultaneous generation of two monoenergetic electron bunches with individually tunable energy up to several hundred MeV. Due to the underlying injection physics, the lengths of the bunches as well as their temporal separation inherently amount to femtoseconds. In combination with established beam-handling and insertion devices, these results pave the way to laboratory-scale multi-beam experiments with unprecedented scope in energy tuning and time resolution.
  • Laser wakefield acceleration of electrons represents a basis for several types of novel X-ray sources based on Thomson scattering or betatron radiation. The latter provides a high photon flux and a small source size, both being prerequisites for high-quality X-ray imaging. Furthermore, proof-of-principle experiments have demonstrated its application for tomographic imaging. So far this required several hours of acquisition time for a complete tomographic data set. Based on improvements to the laser system, detectors and reconstruction algorithms, we were able to reduce this time for a full tomographic scan to 3 minutes. In this paper, we discuss these results and give a prospect to future imaging systems.
  • Laser-driven X-ray sources are an emerging alternative to conventional X-ray tubes and synchrotron sources. We present results on microtomographic X-ray imaging of a cancellous human bone sample using synchrotron-like betatron radiation. The source is driven by a 100-TW-class titanium-sapphire laser system and delivers over $10^8$ X-ray photons per second. Compared to earlier studies, the acquisition time for an entire tomographic dataset has been reduced by more than an order of magnitude. Additionally, the reconstruction quality benefits from the use of statistical iterative reconstruction techniques. Depending on the desired resolution, tomographies are thereby acquired within minutes, which is an important milestone towards real-life applications of laser-plasma X-ray sources.
  • Recent results on laser wakefield acceleration in tailored plasma channels have underlined the importance of controlling the density profile of the gas target. In particular it was reported that appropriate density tailoring can result in improved injection, acceleration and collimation of laser-accelerated electron beams. To achieve such profiles innovative target designs are required. For this purpose we have reviewed the usage of additive layer manufacturing, commonly known as 3D printing, in order to produce gas jet nozzles. Notably we have compared the performance of two industry standard techniques, namely selective laser sintering (SLS) and stereolithography (SLA). Furthermore we have used the common fused deposition modeling (FDM) to reproduce basic gas jet designs and used SLA and SLS for more sophisticated nozzle designs. The nozzles are characterized interferometrically and used for electron acceleration experiments with the Salle Jaune terawatt laser at Laboratoire d'Optique Appliqu\'ee.
  • Laser wakefield acceleration permits the generation of ultra-short, high-brightness relativistic electron beams on a millimeter scale. While those features are of interest for many applications, the source remains constraint by the poor stability of the electron injection process. Here we present results on injection and acceleration of electrons in pure nitrogen and argon. We observe stable, continuous ionization-induced injection of electrons into the wakefield for laser powers exceeding a threshold of 7 TW. The beam charge scales approximately linear with the laser energy and is limited by beam loading. For 40 TW laser pulses we measure a maximum charge of almost 1 nC per shot, originating mostly from electrons of less than 10 MeV energy. The relatively low energy, the high charge and its stability make this source well-suited for applications such as non-destructive testing. Hence, we demonstrate the production of energetic radiation via bremsstrahlung conversion at 1 Hz repetition rate. In accordance with Geant4 Monte-Carlo simulations, we measure a gamma-ray source size of less than 100 microns for a 0.5 mm tantalum converter placed at 2 mm from the accelerator exit. Furthermore we present radiographs of image quality indicators.
  • The energy gain in laser wakefield accelerators is limited by dephasing between the driving laser pulse and the highly relativistic electrons in its wake. Since this phase depends on both the driver and the cavity length, the effects of dephasing can be mitigated with appropriate tailoring of the plasma density along propagation. Preceding studies have discussed the prospects of continuous phase-locking in the linear wakefield regime. However, most experiments are performed in the highly non-linear regime and rely on self-guiding of the laser pulse. Due to the complexity of the driver evolution in this regime it is much more difficult to achieve phase locking. As an alternative we study the scenario of rapid rephasing in sharp density transitions, as was recently demonstrated experimentally. Starting from a phenomenological model we deduce expressions for the electron energy gain in such density profiles. The results are in accordance with particle-in-cell simulations and we present gain estimations for single and multiple stages of rephasing.
  • All-optical Compton sources are innovative, compact devices to produce high energy femtosecond X-rays. Here we present results on a single-pulse scheme that uses a plasma mirror to reflect the drive beam of a laser plasma accelerator and to make it collide with the highly-relativistic electrons in its wake. The accelerator is operated in the self-injection regime, producing quasi-monoenergetic electron beams of around 150 MeV peak energy. Scattering with the intense femtosecond laser pulse leads to the emission of a collimated high energy photon beam. Using continuum-attenuation filters we measure significant signal content beyond 100 keV and with simulations we estimate a peak photon energy of around 500 keV. The source divergence is about 13 mrad and the pointing stability is 7 mrad. We demonstrate that the photon yield from the source is sufficiently high to illuminate a centimeter-size sample placed 90 centimeters behind the source, thus obtaining radiographs in a single shot.