• We addressed the so far unexplored issue of outflows induced by exponentially growing power sources, focusing on early supermassive black holes (BHs). We assumed that these objects grow to $10^9\;M_{\odot}$ by z=6 by Eddington-limited accretion and convert 5% of their bolometric output into a wind. We first considered the case of energy-driven and momentum-driven outflows expanding in a region where the gas and total mass densities are uniform and equal to the average values in the Universe at $z>6$. We derived analytic solutions for the evolution of the outflow, finding that, for an exponentially growing power with e-folding time $t_{Sal}$, the late time expansion of the outflow radius is also exponential, with e-folding time of $5t_{Sal}$ and $4t_{Sal}$ in the energy-driven and momentum-driven limit, respectively. We then considered energy-driven outflows produced by QSOs at the center of early dark matter halos of different masses and powered by BHs growing from different seeds. We followed the evolution of the source power and of the gas and dark matter density profiles in the halos from the beginning of the accretion until $z=6$. The final bubble radius and velocity do not depend on the seed BH mass but are instead smaller for larger halo masses. At z=6, bubble radii in the range 50-180 kpc and velocities in the range 400-1000 km s$^{-1}$ are expected for QSOs hosted by halos in the mass range $3\times10^{11}-10^{13}\;M_{\odot}$. By the time the QSO is observed, we found that the total thermal energy injected within the bubble in the case of an energy-driven outflow is $E_{th}\sim5 \times 10^{60}$ erg. This is in excellent agreement with the value of $E_{th}=(6.2\pm 1.7)\times 10^{60}$ erg measured through the detection of the thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect around a large population of luminous QSOs at lower redshift. [abridged]
  • We report on five compact, extremely young (<10Myr) and blue (\beta_UV<-2.5, F_\lambda =\lambda^\beta) objects observed with VLT/MUSE at redshift 3.1169, 3.235, in addition to three objects at z=6.145. These sources are magnified by the Hubble Frontier Field galaxy clusters MACS~J0416 and AS1063. Their de-lensed half light radii (Re) are between 16 to 140pc, the stellar masses are ~1-20 X 10^6 Msun, the magnitudes are m_uv=28.8 - 31.4 (-17<Muv<-15) and specific star formation rates can be as large as ~800Gyr^-1. Multiple images of these systems are widely separated in the sky (up to 50'') and individually magnified by factors 3-40. Remarkably, the inferred physical properties of two objects are similar to those expected in some globular cluster formation scenarios, representing the best candidate proto-globular clusters (proto-GC) discovered so far. Rest-frame optical high dispersion spectroscopy of one of them at z=3.1169 yields a velocity dispersion \sigma_v~20km/s, implying a dynamical mass dominated by the stellar mass. Another object at z=6.145, with de-lensed Muv ~ -15.3 (m_uv ~ 31.4), shows a stellar mass and a star-formation rate surface density consistent with the values expected from popular GC formation scenarios. An additional star-forming region at z=6.145, with de-lensed m_uv ~ 32, a stellar mass of 0.5 X 10^6 Msun and a star formation rate of 0.06 Msun/yr is also identified. These objects currently represent the faintest spectroscopically confirmed star-forming systems at z>3, elusive even in the deepest blank fields. We discuss how proto-GCs might contribute to the ionization budget of the universe and augment Lya visibility during reionization. This work underlines the crucial role of JWST in characterizing the rest-frame optical and near-infrared properties of such low-luminosity high-z objects.
  • We study the interaction of the early spherical GC wind powered by Type II supernovae (SNe II) with the surrounding ambient medium consisting of the gaseous disk of a star forming galaxy at redshift z ~> 2. The bubble formed by the wind eventually breaks out of the disk, and most of the wind moves directly out of the galaxy and is definitively lost. The fraction of the wind moving nearly parallel to the galactic plane carves a hole in the disk which will contract after the end of the SN activity. During the interval of time between the end of the SN explosions and the "closure" of the hole, very O-poor stars (the Extreme population) can form out of the super-AGB (asymptotic giant branch) ejecta collected in the GC center. Once the hole contracts, the AGB ejecta mix with the pristine gas, allowing the formation of stars with an oxygen abundance intermediate between that of the very O-poor stars and that of the pristine gas. We show that this mechanism may explain why Extreme populations are present only in massive clusters, and can also produce a correlation between the spread in helium and the cluster mass. Finally, we also explore the possibility that our proposed mechanism can be extended to the case of multiple populations showing bimodality in the iron content, with the presence of two populations characterized by a small difference in [Fe/H]. Such a result can be obtained taking into account the contribution of delayed SN II.
  • We explain the multiple populations recently found in the 'prototype' Globular Cluster (GC) NGC 2808 in the framework of the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) scenario. The chemistry of the five -or more- populations is approximately consistent with a sequence of star formation events, starting after the supernovae type II epoch, lasting approximately until the time when the third dredge up affects the AGB evolution (age ~90-120Myr), and ending when the type Ia supernovae begin exploding in the cluster, eventually clearing it from the gas. The formation of the different populations requires episodes of star formation in AGB gas diluted with different amounts of pristine gas. In the nitrogen-rich, helium-normal population identified in NGC 2808 by the UV Legacy Survey of GCs, the nitrogen increase is due to the third dredge up in the smallest mass AGB ejecta involved in the star formation of this population. The possibly-iron-rich small population in NGC 2808 may be a result of contamination by a single type Ia supernova. The NGC 2808 case is used to build a general framework to understand the variety of 'second generation' stars observed in GCs. Cluster-to-cluster variations are ascribed to differences in the effects of the many processes and gas sources which may be involved in the formation of the second generation. We discuss an evolutionary scheme, based on pollution by delayed type II supernovae, which accounts for the properties of s-Fe-anomalous clusters.
  • We investigated the impact of supernova feedback in gas-rich dwarf galaxies experiencing a low-to-moderate star formation rate, typical of relatively quiescent phases between starbursts. We calculated the long term evolution of the ISM and the metal-rich SN ejecta using 3D hydrodynamic simulations, in which the feedback energy is deposited by SNeII exploding in distinct OB associations. We found that a circulation flow similar to galactic fountains is generally established, with some ISM lifted at heights of one to few kpc above the galactic plane. This gas forms an extra-planar layer, which falls back to the plane in about $10^8$ yr, once the star formation stops. Very little or no ISM is expelled outside the galaxy system for the considered SFRs, even though in the most powerful model the SN energy is comparable to the gas binding energy. The metal-rich SN ejecta is instead more vulnerable to the feedback and we found that a significant fraction (25-80\%) is vented in the intergalactic medium, even for low SN rate ($7\times 10^{-5}$ - $7\times 10^{-4}$ yr$^{-1}$). About half of the metals retained by the galaxy are located far ($z >$ 500 pc) from the galactic plane. Moreover, our models indicate that the circulation of the metal-rich gas out from and back to the galactic disk is not able to erase the chemical gradients imprinted by the (centrally concentrated) SN explosions.
  • Context: The study of chemical abundance patterns in globular clusters is of key importance to constrain the different candidates for intra-cluster pollution of light elements. Aims: We aim at deriving accurate abundances for a large range of elements in the globular cluster 47 Tucanae (NGC 104) to add new constraints to the pollution scenarios for this particular cluster, expanding the range of previously derived element abundances. Methods: Using tailored 1D LTE atmospheric models together with a combination of equivalent width measurements, LTE, and NLTE synthesis we derive stellar parameters and element abundances from high-resolution, high signal-to-noise spectra of 13 red giant stars near the tip of the RGB. Results: We derive abundances of a total 27 elements (O, Na, Mg, Al, Si, Ca, Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Y, Zr, Mo, Ru, Ba, La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Eu, Dy). Departures from LTE were taken into account for Na, Al and Ba. We find a mean [Fe/H] = $-0.78\pm0.07$ and $[\alpha/{\rm Fe}]=0.34\pm0.03$ in good agreement with previous studies. The remaining elements show good agreement with the literature, but the inclusion of NLTE for Al has a significant impact on the behaviour of this key element. Conclusions: We confirm the presence of an Na-O anti-correlation in 47 Tucanae found by several other works. Our NLTE analysis of Al shifts the [Al/Fe] to lower values, indicating that this may be overestimated in earlier works. No evidence for an intrinsic variation is found in any of the remaining elements.
  • We use the combination of photometric and spectroscopic data of 47 Tuc stars to reconstruct the possible formation of a second generation of stars in the central regions of the cluster, from matter ejected from massive Asymptotic Giant Branch stars, diluted with pristine gas. The yields from massive AGB stars with the appropriate metallicity (Z=0.004, i.e. [Fe/H]=-0.75) are compatible with the observations, in terms of extension and slope of the patterns observed, involving oxygen, nitrogen, sodium and aluminium. Based on the constraints on the maximum helium of 47 Tuc stars provided by photometric investigations, and on the helium content of the ejecta, we estimate that the gas out of which second generation stars formed was composed of about one-third of gas from intermediate mass stars, with M>= 5Mo and about two-thirds of pristine gas. We tentatively identify the few stars whose Na, Al and O abundances resemble the undiluted AGB yields with the small fraction of 47 Tuc stars populating the faint subgiant branch. From the relative fraction of first and second generation stars currently observed, we estimate that the initial FG population in 47 Tuc was about 7.5 times more massive than the cluster current total mass.
  • We analyze the evolution of colour gradients predicted by the hydrodynamical models of early type galaxies (ETGs) in Pipino et al. (2008), which reproduce fairly well the chemical abundance pattern and the metallicity gradients of local ETGs. We convert the star formation (SF) and metal content into colours by means of stellar population synthetic model and investigate the role of different physical ingredients, as the initial gas distribution and content, and eps_SF, i.e. the normalization of SF rate. From the comparison with high redshift data, a full agreement with optical rest-frame observations at z < 1 is found, for models with low eps_SF, whereas some discrepancies emerge at 1 < z < 2, despite our models reproduce quite well the data scatter at these redshifts. To reconcile the prediction of these high eps_SF systems with the shallower colour gradients observed at lower z we suggest intervention of 1-2 dry mergers. We suggest that future studies should explore the impact of wet galaxy mergings, interactions with environment, dust content and a variation of the Initial Mass Function from the galactic centers to the peripheries.
  • We examine the photometric data for Fornax clusters, focussing our attention on their horizontal branch color distribution and, when available, on the RR Lyr variables fraction and period distribution. Based on our understanding of the HB morphology in terms of varying helium content in the context of multiple stellar generations, we show that clusters F2, F3 and F5 must contain substantial fractions of second generation stars (~54-65%). On the basis of a simple chemical evolution model we show that the helium distribution in these clusters can be reproduced by models with cluster initial masses ranging from values equal to ~4 to ~10 times larger than the current masses. Models with a very short second generation star formation episode can also reproduce the observed helium distribution but require larger initial masses up to about twenty times the current mass. While the lower limit of this range of possible initial GC masses is consistent with those suggested by the observations of the low metallicity field stars, we also discuss the possibility that the metallicity scale of field stars (based on CaII triplet spectroscopy) and the metallicities derived for the clusters in Fornax may not be consistent with each other. The reproduction of the HB morphology in F2,F3,F5 requires two interesting hypotheses: 1) the first generation HB stars lie all at "red" colours. According to this interpretation, the low metallicity stars in the field of Fornax, populating the HB at colours bluer than the blue side ((V-I)o<=0.3 or (B-V)o<=0.2) of the RR Lyrs, should be second generation stars born in the clusters;a preliminary analysis of available colour surveys of Fornax field provides a fraction ~20% of blue HB stars, in the low metallicity range; 2) the mass loss from individual second generation red giants is a few percent of a solar mass larger than the mass loss from first generation stars.
  • Globular cluster stars show chemical abundance patterns typical of hot-CNO processing. Lithium is easily destroyed by proton capture in stellar environments, so its abundance may be crucial to discriminate among different models proposed to account for multiple populations. In order to reproduce the observed O-Na anticorrelation and other patterns typical of multiple populations, the formation of second generation stars must occur from the nuclearly processed stellar ejecta, responsible of the chemical anomalies, diluted with pristine gas having the composition of first generation stars. The lithium abundance in the unprocessed gas -which is very likely to be equal to the lithium abundance emerging from the Big Bang- affects the lithium chemical patterns among the cluster stars. This paper focuses on a scenario in which processed gas is provided by asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars. We examine the predictions of this scenario for the lithium abundances of multiple populations. We study the role of the non-negligible lithium abundance in the ejecta of massive AGB (A(Li)~2), and, at the same time, we explore how our models can constrain the extremely large ---and very model dependent--- lithium yields predicted by recent super--AGB models. We show that the super--AGB yields may be tested by examining the lithium abundances in a large set of blue main sequence stars in wCen and/or NGC2808. In addition, we examine the different model results obtained by assuming for the pristine gas either the Big Bang abundance predicted by the standard models (A(Li)=2.6-2.7), or the abundance detected at the surface of population II stars (A(Li)=2.2-2.3). Once a chemical model is well constrained, the O--Li distribution could perhaps be used to shed light on the primordial lithium abundance.
  • Recent exam of large samples of omega Cen giants shows that it shares with mono-metallic globular clusters the presence of the sodium versus oxygen anticorrelation, within each subset of stars with iron content in the range -1.9<~[Fe/H]<~-1.3. These findings suggest that, while the second generation formation history in omega Cen is more complex than that of mono-metallic clusters, it shares some key steps with those simpler cluster. In addition, the giants in the range -1.3<[Fe/H]<~-0.7 show a direct O--Na correlation, at moderately low O, but Na up to 20 times solar. These peculiar Na abundances are not shared by stars in other environments often assumed to undergo a similar chemical evolution, such as in the field of the Sagittarius dwarf galaxy. These O and Na abundances match well the yields of the massive asymptotic giant branch stars (AGB) in the same range of metallicity, suggesting that the stars at [Fe/H]>-1.3 in omega Cen are likely to have formed directly from the pure ejecta of massive AGBs of the same metallicities. This is possible if the massive AGBs of [Fe/H]>-1.3 in the progenitor system evolve when all the pristine gas surrounding the cluster has been exhausted by the previous star formation events, or the proto--cluster interaction with the Galaxy caused the loss of a significant fraction of its mass, or of its dark matter halo, and the supernova ejecta have been able to clear the gas out of the system. The absence of dilution in the metal richer populations lends further support to a scenario of the formation of second generation stars in cooling flows from massive AGB progenitors. We suggest that the entire formation of omega Cen took place in a few 10^8yr, and discuss the problem of a prompt formation of s--process elements.
  • AGN heating, through massive subrelativistic outflows, might be the key to solve the long-lasting `cooling flow problem' in cosmological systems. In a previous paper, we showed that cold accretion feedback and, to a lesser degree, Bondi self-regulated models are in fact able to quench cooling rates for several Gyr, at the same time preserving the mainc ool core features, like observed density and temperature profiles. Is it true also for lighter systems, such as galaxy groups? The answer is globally yes, although with remarkable differences. Adopting a modified version of the AMR code FLASH 3.2, we found that successful 3D simulations with cold and Bondi models are almost convergent in the galaxy group environment, with mechanical efficiencies in the range 5.e-4 - 1.e-3 and 5.e-2 - 1.e-1, respectively. The evolutionary storyline of galaxy groups is dominated by a quasi-continuous gentle injection with sub-Eddington outflows (with mechanical power and velocity around 1.e44 erg/s and 1.e4 km/s). The cold and hybrid accretion models present, in addition, very short quiescence periods, followed by moderate outbursts (10 times the previous phase), which generate a series of 10-20 kpc size cavities with high density contrast, temperatures similar to the ambient medium and cold rims. After shock heating, a phase of turbulence promotes gas mixing and diffusion of metals, which peak along jet-axis (up to 40 kpc) during active phases. At this stage the tunnel, produced by the enduring outflow (hard to detect in the mock SBx maps), is easily fragmented, producing tiny buoyant bubbles, typically a few kpc in size. In contrast to galaxy clusters, the AGN self-regulated feedback has to be persistent, with a `delicate touch', rather than rare and explosive strokes. This evolutionary difference dictates in the end that galaxy groups are not scaled-down versions of clusters.
  • It is now widely accepted that heating processes play a fundamental role in galaxy clusters, struggling in an intricate but fascinating `dance' with its antagonist, radiative cooling. Last generation observations, especially X-ray, are giving us tiny hints about the notes of this endless ballet. Cavities, shocks, turbulence and wide absorption-lines indicate the central active nucleus is injecting huge amount of energy in the intracluster medium. However, which is the real dominant engine of self-regulated heating? One of the model we propose are massive subrelativistic outflows, probably generated by a wind disc or just the result of the entrainment on kpc scale by the fast radio jet. Using a modified version of AMR code FLASH 3.2, we explored several feedback mechanisms which self-regulate the mechanical power. Two are the best schemes that answer our primary question, id est quenching cooling flow and at the same time preserving a cool core appearance for a long term evolution (7 Gyr): one more explosive (with efficiencies 0.005 - 0.01), triggered by central cooled gas, and the other gentler, ignited by hot gas Bondi accretion (with efficiency 0.1). These three-dimensional simulations show that the total energy injected is not the key aspect, but the results strongly depend on how energy is given to the ICM. We follow the dynamics of best model (temperature, density, SB maps and profiles) and produce many observable predictions: buoyant bubbles, ripples, turbulence, iron abundance maps and hydrostatic equilibrium deviation. We present a deep discussion of merits and flaws of all our models, with a critical eye towards observational concordance.
  • We consider the horizontal branch (HB) of the Globular Cluster Terzan 5, recently shown to be split into two parts, the fainter one (delta M_K ~ 0.3mag) having a lower metallicity than the more luminous. Both features show that it contains at least two stellar populations. The separation in magnitude has been ascribed to an age difference of ~6 Gyr and interpreted as the result of an atypical evolutionary history for this cluster. We show that the observed HB morphology is also consistent with a model in which the bright HB is composed of second generation stars that are metal enriched and with a helium mass fraction larger (by delta Y ~ 0.07) than that of first generation stars populating the fainter part of the HB. Terzan 5 would therefore be anomalous, compared to most "normal" clusters hosting multiple populations, only because its second generation is strongly contaminated by supernova ejecta; the previously proposed prolonged period of star formation, however, is not required. The iron enrichment of the bright HB can be ascribed either to contamination from Type Ia supernova ejecta of the low-iron, helium rich, ejecta of the massive asympotic giant branch stars of the cluster, or to its mixing with gas, accreting on the cluster from the environment, that has been subject to fast metal enrichment due to its proximity with the galactic bulge. The model here proposed requires only a small age difference, of ~100Myr.
  • We compute 3D gasdynamical models of jet outflows from the central AGN, that carry mass as well as energy to the hot gas in galaxy clusters and groups. These flows have many attractive attributes for solving the cooling flow problem: why the hot gas temperature and density profiles resemble cooling flows but show no spectral evidence of cooling to low temperatures. Subrelativistic jets, described by a few parameters, are assumed to be activated when gas flows toward or cools near a central SMBH. Using approximate models for a rich cluster (A1795), a poor cluster (2A 0336+096) and a group (NGC 5044), we show that mass-carrying jets with intermediate mechanical efficiencies ($\sim10^{-3}$) can reduce for many Gyr the global cooling rate to or below the low values implied by X-spectra, while maintaining $T$ and $\rho$ profiles similar to those observed, at least in clusters. Groups are much more sensitive to AGN heating and present extreme time variability in both profiles. Finally, the intermittency of the feedback generates multiple generations of X-ray cavities similar to those observed in Perseus cluster and elsewhere. Thus we also study the formation of buoyant bubbles and weak shocks in the ICM, along with the injection of metals by SNIa and stellar winds.
  • We review here the effects of supernovae (SNe) explosions on the environment of star-forming galaxies. Randomly distributed, clustered SNe explosions cause the formation of hot superbubbles that drive either galactic fountains or supersonic winds out of the galactic disk. In a galactic fountain, the ejected gas is re-captured by the gravitational potential and falls back onto the disk. From 3D non-equilibrium radiative cooling hydrodynamical simulations of these fountains, we find that they may reach altitudes smaller than 5 kpc in the halo and hence explain the formation of the so-called intermediate-velocity-clouds (IVCs). On the other hand, the high-velocity-clouds (HVCs) that are observed at higher altitudes (of up to 12 kpc) require another mechanism to explain their production. We argue that they could be formed either by the capture of gas from the intergalactic medium and/or by the action of magnetic fields that are carried out to the halo with the gas in the fountains. Due to angular momentum losses (of 10-15%) to the halo, we find that the fountain material falls back to smaller radii and is not largely spread over the galactic disk, as previously expected. This result is consistent with the metal distribution derived from recent chemical models of the galaxy. We also find that after about 150 Myr, the gas circulation between the halo and the disk in the fountains reaches a steady state regime (abridged).
  • We present 3D hydrodynamic simulations of ram pressure stripping in dwarf galaxies. Analogous studies on this subject usually deal with much higher ram pressures, typical of galaxy clusters, or mild ram pressure due to the gas halo of the massive galactic companions. We extend over previous investigations by considering flattened, rotating dwarf galaxies subject to ram pressures typical of poor galaxy groups. We study the ram pressure effects as a function of several parameters such as galactic mass and velocity, ambient gas density, and angle between the galactic plane and the direction of motion. It turns out that this latter parameter plays a role only when the gas pressure in the galactic centre is comparable to the ram pressure. Despite the low values of the ram pressure, some dwarf galaxies can be completely stripped after 1-2 hundred of million years. This pose an interesting question on the aspect of the descents and, more in general, on the morphological evolution of dwarf galaxies. In cases in which the gas is not completely stripped, the propagation of possible galactic wind may be influenced by the disturbed distribution of the interstellar matter. We also consider the modification of the ISM surface density induced by the ram pessure and find that the resulting compression may trigger star formation over long time spans.
  • In this paper we present some results concerning the effects of two instantaneous starbursts, separated by a quiescent period, on the dynamical and chemical evolution of blue compact dwarf galaxies. In particular, we compare the model results to the galaxy IZw18, which is a very metal-poor, gas-rich dwarf galaxy, possibly experiencing its first or second burst of star formation. We follow the evolution of a first weak burst of star formation followed by a second more intense one occurring after several hundreds million years. We find that a galactic wind develops only during the second burst and that metals produced in the burst are preferentially lost relative to the hydrogen gas. We predict the evolution of several chemical abundances (H, He, C, N, O, \alpha-elements, Fe) in the gas inside and outside the galaxy, by taking into account in detail the chemical and energetical contributions from type II and Ia supernovae. We find that the abundances predicted for the star forming region are in good agreement with the HII region abundances derived for IZw18. We also predict the abundances of C, N and O expected for the HI gas to be compared with future FUSE abundance determinations. We conclude that IZw18 must have experienced two bursts of star formation, one occurred \sim 300 Myr ago and a present one with an age between 4-7 Myr. However, by taking into account also other independent estimates, such as the color-magnitude diagram and the spectral energy distribution of stars in IZw18, and the fact that real starbursts are not instantaneous, we suggest that it is more likely that the burst age is between 4 and 15 Myr.
  • During a Hubble time, cluster galaxies may undergo several mutual encounters close enough to gravitationally perturb their hot, X-ray emitting gas flows. We ran several 2D, time dependent hydrodynamical models to investigate the effects of such perturbations on the gas flow inside elliptical galaxies. In particular, we studied in detail the modifications occurring in the scenario proposed by D'Ercole et al. (1989), in which the galactic interstellar medium produced by the aging galactic stellar population, is heated by SNIa at a decreasing rate. We find that, although the tidal interaction in our models lasts less than 1 Gyr, its effect extends over several Gyrs. The tidally induced turbulent flows create dense filaments which cool quickly and accrete onto the galactic center, producing large spikes in the global Lx. Once this mechanism starts, it is fed by gravity and amplified by SNIa. In cooling flow models without supernovae the amplitude of the Lx fluctuations due to the tidal interaction is substantially reduced. We conclude that, if SNIa significantly contribute to the energetics of the gas flows in ellipticals, then the observed spread in the Lx-Lb diagram may be caused, at least in part, by this mechanism. On the contrary, tidal interactions cannot be responsible for the observed spread if the pure cooling flow scenario applies (abridged).
  • We study, through 2D hydrodynamical simulations, the feedback of a starburst on the ISM of typical gas rich dwarf galaxies. The main goal is to address the circulation of the ISM and metals following the starburst. We assume a single-phase rotating ISM in equilibrium in the galactic potential generated by a stellar disk and a spherical dark halo. The starburst is assumed to occur in a small volume in the center of the galaxy, and it generates a mechanical power of 3.8e39 erg/s or 3.8e40 erg/s for 30 Myr. We found, consistently with previous investigations, that the galactic wind is not very effective in removing the ISM. The metal rich stellar ejecta, instead, may be efficiently expelled from the galaxy and dispersed in the intergalactic medium. Moreover, we found that the central region of the galaxy is always replenished with cold and dense gas after a few 100 Myr from the starbust, achieving the requisite for a new star formation event in 0.5-1 Gyr. The hydrodynamical evolution of galactic winds is thus consistent with the episodic star formation regime suggested by many chemical evolution studies. We also discuss the X-ray emission of these galaxies and find that the observable (emission averaged) abundance of the hot gas underestimates the real one if thermal conduction is effective. This could explain the very low hot gas metallicities estimated in starburst galaxies.
  • A chemical evolution model following the evolution of the abundances of H, He, C, N, O and Fe for dwarf irregular and blue compact galaxies is presented. This model takes into account detailed nucleosynthesis and computes in detail the rates of supernovae of type II and I. The star formation is assumed to have proceeded in short but intense bursts. The novelty relative to previous models is that the development of a galactic wind is studied in detail by taking into account the energy injected into the interstellar medium (ISM) from both supernovae and stellar winds from massive stars as well as the presence of dark matter halos. Both metal enriched and normal winds have been considered. Our main conclusions are: i) a substantial amount of dark matter (from 1 to 50 times larger than the luminous matter) is required in order to avoid the complete destruction of such galaxies during strong starbursts, and ii) the energy injected by stellar winds and type Ia supernovae into the ISM is negligible relative to the total thermal energy, and in particular to the type II supernovae, which in fact, dominate the energetics during starbursts.
  • A recent analysis of the "Einstein" sample of early-type galaxies has revealed that at any fixed optical luminosity Lb S0 galaxies have lower mean X-ray luminosity Lx per unit Lb than ellipticals. Following a previous analytical investigation of this problem (Ciotti & Pellegrini 1996), we have performed 2D numerical simulations of the gas flows inside S0 galaxies in order to ascertain the effectiveness of rotation and/or galaxy flattening in reducing the Lx/Lb ratio. The flow in models without SNIa heating is considerably ordered, and essentially all the gas lost by the stars is cooled and accumulated in the galaxy center. If rotation is present, the cold material settles in a disk on the galactic equatorial plane. Models with a time decreasing SNIa heating host gas flows that can be much more complex. After an initial wind phase, gas flows in energetically strongly bound galaxies tend to reverse to inflows. This occurs in the polar regions, while the disk is still in the outflow phase. In this phase of strong decoupling, cold filaments are created at the interface between inflowing and outflowing gas. Models with more realistic values of the dynamical quantities are preferentially found in the wind phase with respect to their spherical counterparts of equal Lb. The resulting Lx of this class of models is lower than in spherical models with the same Lb and SNIa heating. At variance with cooling flow models, rotation is shown to have only a marginal effect in this reduction, while the flattening is one of the driving parameters for such underluminosity, in accordance with the analytical investigation.