• The split main sequences (MSs) and extended MS turnoffs (eMSTOs) detected in a few young clusters have demonstrated that these stellar systems host multiple populations differing in a number of properties such as rotation and, possibly, age.We analyze Hubble Space Telescope photometry for thirteen clusters with ages between ~40 and ~1000 Myrs and of different masses. Our goal is to investigate for the first time the occurrence of multiple populations in a large sample of young clusters. We find that all the clusters exhibit the eMSTO phenomenon and that MS stars more massive than ~1.6 solar masses define a blue and red MS, with the latter hosting the majority of MS stars. The comparison between the observations and isochrones suggests that the blue MSs are made of slow-rotating stars, while the red MSs host stars with rotational velocities close to the breakup value. About half of the bright MS stars in the youngest clusters are H-alpha emitters. These Be stars populate the red MS and the reddest part of the eMSTO thus supporting the idea that the red MS is made of fast rotators. We conclude that the split MS and the eMSTO are a common feature of young clusters in both Magellanic Clouds. The phenomena of a split MS and an eMSTO occur for stars that are more massive than a specific threshold which is independent of the host-cluster mass. As a by-product, we report the serendipitous discovery of a young SMC cluster, GALFOR1.
  • We present a second set of results from a wide-field photometric survey of the environs of Milky Way globular clusters. The clusters studied are NGC 1261, NGC 1851 and NGC 5824: all have data from DECam on the Blanco 4m telescope. NGC 5824 also has data from the Magellan Clay telescope with MegaCam. We confirm the existence of a large diffuse stellar envelope surrounding NGC 1851 of size at least 240 pc in radius. The radial density profile of the envelope follows a power-law decline with index $\gamma = -1.5 \pm 0.2$ and the projected shape is slightly elliptical. For NGC 5824 there is no strong detection of a diffuse stellar envelope, but we find the cluster is remarkably extended and is similar in size (at least 230 pc in radius) to the envelope of NGC 1851. A stellar envelope is also revealed around NGC 1261. However, it is notably smaller in size with radius $\sim$105 pc. The radial density profile of the envelope is also much steeper with $\gamma = -3.8 \pm 0.2$. We discuss the possible nature of the diffuse stellar envelopes, but are unable to draw definitive conclusions based on the current data. NGC 1851, and potentially NGC 5824, could be stripped dwarf galaxy nuclei, akin to the cases of $\omega$ Cen, M54 and M2. On the other hand, the different characteristics of the NGC 1261 envelope suggest that it may be the product of dynamical evolution of the cluster.
  • We use a new contiguous imaging survey conducted using the Dark Energy Camera to investigate the distribution and properties of young stellar populations in the Magellanic inter-Cloud region. These young stars are strongly spatially clustered, forming a narrow chain of low-mass associations that trace the densest HI gas in the Magellanic Bridge and extend, in projection, from the SMC to the outer disk of the LMC. The associations in our survey footprint have ages $\lesssim 30$ Myr, masses in the range $\sim 100-1200\,{\rm M}_\odot$, and very diffuse structures with half-light radii of up to $\sim 100$ pc. The two most populous are strongly elliptical, and aligned to $\approx 10^{{\rm o}}$ with the axis joining the centres of the LMC and SMC. These observations strongly suggest that the young inter-Cloud populations formed in situ, likely due to the compression of gas stripped during the most recent close LMC-SMC encounter. The associations lie at distances intermediate between the two Clouds, and we find no evidence for a substantial distance gradient across the imaged area. Finally, we identify a vast shell of young stars surrounding a central association, that is spatially coincident with a low column density bubble in the HI distribution. The properties of this structure are consistent with a scenario where stellar winds and supernova explosions from massive stars in the central cluster swept up the ambient gas into a shell, triggering a new burst of star formation. This is a prime location for studying stellar feedback in a relatively isolated environment.
  • The stellar halos of large galaxies represent a vital probe of the processes of galaxy evolution. They are the remnants of the initial bouts of star formation during the collapse of the proto-galactic cloud, coupled with imprint of ancient and on-going accretion events. Previously, we have reported the tentative detection of a possible, faint, extended stellar halo in the Local Group spiral, the Triangulum Galaxy (M33). However, the presence of substructure surrounding M33 made interpretation of this feature difficult. Here, we employ the final data set from the Pan-Andromeda Archaeological Survey (PAndAS), combined with an improved calibration and a newly derived contamination model for the region to revisit this claim. With an array of new fitting algorithms, fully accounting for contamination and the substantial substructure beyond the prominent stellar disk in M33, we reanalyse the surrounds to separate the signal of the stellar halo and the outer halo substructure. Using more robust search algorithms, we do not detect a large scale smooth stellar halo and place a limit on the maximum surface brightness of such a feature of ${\mu}_V$ = 35.5 mags per square arcsec, or a total halo luminosity of $L < 10^6L_{\odot}$.
  • We present deep stellar photometry of the Bo\"otes I dwarf spheroidal galaxy in g and i band filters, taken with the Dark Energy Camera at Cerro Tololo in Chile. Our analysis reveals a large, extended region of stellar substructure surrounding the dwarf, as well as a distinct over-density encroaching on its tidal radius. A radial profile of the Bo\"otes I stellar distribution shows a break radius indicating the presence of extra-tidal stars. These observations strongly suggest that Bo\"otes I is experiencing tidal disruption, although not as extreme as that exhibited by the Hercules dwarf spheroidal. Combined with revised velocity dispersion measurements from the literature, we see evidence suggesting the need to review previous theoretical models of the Bo\"otes I dwarf spheroidal galaxy.
  • We present the results of a wide-field imaging survey of the periphery of the Milky Way globular cluster NGC 7089 (M2). Data were obtained with MegaCam on the Magellan Clay Telescope, and the Dark Energy Camera on the Blanco Telescope. We find that M2 is embedded in a diffuse stellar envelope extending to a radial distance of at least $\sim 60^{\prime}$ ($\sim 210$ pc) -- five times the nominal tidal radius of the cluster. The envelope appears nearly circular in shape, has a radial density decline well described by a power law of index $\gamma = -2.2 \pm 0.2$, and contains approximately $1.6\%$ of the luminosity of the entire system. While the origin of the envelope cannot be robustly identified using the presently available data, the fact that M2 also hosts stellar populations exhibiting a broad dispersion in the abundances of both iron and a variety of neutron capture elements suggests that this object might plausibly constitute the stripped nucleus of a dwarf Galaxy that was long ago accreted and destroyed by the Milky Way.
  • Recently, Li et al. (2016) claimed to have found evidence for multiple generations of stars in the intermediate age clusters NGC 1783, NGC 1696 and NGC 411 in the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds (LMC/SMC). Here we show that these young stellar populations are present in the field regions around these clusters and are not likely associated with the clusters themselves. Using the same datasets, we find that the background subtraction method adopted by the authors does not adequately remove contaminating stars in the small number Poisson limit. Hence, we conclude that their results do not provide evidence of young generations of stars within these clusters.
  • Nearly all the star clusters with ages of ~1-2 Gyr in both Magellanic Clouds exhibit an extended main-sequence turn off (eMSTO) whose origin is under debate. The main scenarios suggest that the eMSTO could be either due to multiple generations of stars with different ages or to coeval stellar populations with different rotation rates. In this paper we use Hubble-Space-Telescope images to investigate the ~80-Myr old cluster NGC1755 in the LMC. We find that the MS is split with the blue and the red MS hosting about the 25% and the 75% of the total number of MS stars, respectively. Moreover, the MSTO of NGC1755 is broadened in close analogy with what is observed in the ~300-Myr-old NGC1856 and in most intermediate-age Magellanic-Cloud clusters. We demonstrate that both the split MS and the eMSTO are not due to photometric errors, field-stars contamination, differential reddening, or non-interacting binaries. These findings make NGC1755 the youngest cluster with an eMSTO. We compare the observed CMD with isochrones and conclude that observations are not consistent with stellar populations with difference in age, helium, or metallicity only. On the contrary, the split MS is well reproduced by two stellar populations with different rotation, although the fit between the observed eMSTO and models with different rotation is not fully satisfactory. We speculate whether all stars in NGC1755 were born rapidly rotating, and a fraction has slowed down on a rapid timescale, or the dichotomy in rotation rate was present already at star formation. We discuss the implication of these findings on the interpretation of eMSTO in young and intermediate-age clusters.
  • We present the first detailed analysis of the East Cloud, a highly disrupted diffuse stellar substructure in the outer halo of M31. The core of the substructure lies at a projected distance of $\sim100$ kpc from the centre of M31 in the outer halo, with possible extensions reaching right into the inner halo. Using Pan-Andromeda Archaeological Survey photometry of red giant branch stars, we measure the distance, metallicity and brightness of the cloud. Using Hubble Space Telescope data, we independently measure the distance and metallicity to the two globular clusters coincident with the East Cloud core, PA-57 and PA-58, and find their distances to be consistent with the cloud. Four further globular clusters coincident with the substructure extensions are identified as potentially associated. Combining the analyses, we determine a distance to the cloud of $814^{+20}_{-9}$ kpc, a metallicity of $[Fe/H] = -1.2\pm0.1$, and a brightness of $M_V = -10.7\pm0.4$ mag. Even allowing for the inclusion of the potential extensions, this accounts for less than $20$ per cent of the progenitor luminosity implied by the luminosity-metallicity relation. Using the updated techniques developed for this analysis, we also refine our estimates of the distance and brightness of the South-West Cloud, a separate substructure analyzed in the previous work in this series.
  • We present a comprehensive analysis of the globular cluster (GC) system of the Local Group dwarf irregular galaxy NGC 6822. Our study is based on homogeneous optical and near-IR photometry, as well as long-slit spectroscopic observations which are used to determine new radial velocities for 6 GCs, two of which had no previous spectroscopic information. We construct optical-near IR colour-colour diagrams and through comparison to simple stellar population models infer that the GCs have old ages consistent with being 9 Gyr or older, while their metallicities are in the range between -1.6 < [Fe/H] < -0.4. We conduct a kinematic analysis of the GC population and find tentative evidence for weak net rotation of the GC system, in the same sense as that exhibited by the underlying spheroid. The most likely amplitude of rotation is ~10 km/s, approximately half the magnitude of the observed velocity dispersion. Finally, we use the GCs to estimate the dynamical mass of NGC 6822 within 11 kpc and we formally find it to be in the range between (3-4)10^9 Msun. This implies an overall mass-to-light ratio in the range of ~ 30-40 and indicates that NGC 6822 is highly dark matter dominated. The mass and the corresponding mass-to-light ratio estimates are affected by various additional systematic effects due to limitations of the data and the model that are not necessary reflected in the formal uncertainties.
  • We present deep $g,i$-band DECam stellar photometry of the Hercules Milky Way satellite galaxy, and its surrounding field, out to a radial distance of 5.4 times the tidal radius. We have identified nine extended stellar substructures associated with the dwarf; preferentially distributed along the major axis of the galaxy. Two significant over-densities lie outside the 95\% confidence band for the likely orbital path of the galaxy and appear to be free-floating tidal debris. We estimate the luminosity of the new stellar substructures, and find that approximately the same amount of stellar flux is lying in these extended structures as inside the main body of Hercules. We also analyse the distribution of candidate blue-horizontal-branch stars and find agreement with the alignment of the substructures at a confidence level greater than 98\%. Our analysis provides a quantitative demonstration that Hercules is a strongly tidally disrupted system, with noticeable stellar features at least 1.9 kpc away from the galaxy.
  • We present a detailed kinematic analysis of the outer halo globular cluster (GC) system of M31. Our basis for this is a set of new spectroscopic observations for 78 clusters lying at projected distances between Rproj ~20-140 kpc from the M31 centre. These are largely drawn from the recent PAndAS globular cluster catalogue; 63 of our targets have no previous velocity data. Via a Bayesian maximum likelihood analysis we find that GCs with Rproj > 30 kpc exhibit coherent rotation around the minor optical axis of M31, in the same direction as more centrally- located GCs, but with a smaller amplitude of 86+/-17 km s-1. There is also evidence that the velocity dispersion of the outer halo GC system decreases as a function of projected distance from the M31 centre, and that this relation can be well described by a power law of index ~ -0.5. The velocity dispersion profile of the outer halo GCs is quite similar to that of the halo stars, at least out to the radius up to which there is available information on the stellar kinematics. We detect and discuss various velocity correlations amongst subgroups of GCs that lie on stellar debris streams in the M31 halo. Many of these subgroups are dynamically cold, exhibiting internal velocity dispersions consistent with zero. Simple Monte Carlo experiments imply that such configurations are unlikely to form by chance, adding weight to the notion that a significant fraction of the outer halo GCs in M31 have been accreted alongside their parent dwarf galaxies. We also estimate the M31 mass within 200 kpc via the Tracer Mass Estimator, finding (1.2 - 1.6) +/- 0.2 10^{12}M_sun. This quantity is subject to additional systematic effects due to various limitations of the data, and assumptions built in into the TME. Finally, we discuss our results in the context of formation scenarios for the M31 halo.
  • We report the discovery of 59 globular clusters (GCs) and two candidate GCs in a search of the halo of M31, primarily via visual inspection of CHFT/MegaCam imagery from the Pan-Andromeda Archaeological Survey (PAndAS). The superior quality of these data also allow us to check the classification of remote objects in the Revised Bologna Catalogue (RBC), plus a subset of GC candidates drawn from SDSS imaging. We identify three additional new GCs from the RBC, and confirm the GC nature of 11 SDSS objects (8 of which appear independently in our remote halo catalogue); the remaining 188 candidates across both lists are either foreground stars or background galaxies. Our new catalogue represents the first uniform census of GCs across the M31 halo - we find clusters to the limit of the PAndAS survey area at projected radii of up to R_proj ~ 150 kpc. Tests using artificial clusters reveal that detection incompleteness cuts in at luminosities below M_V = -6.0; our 50% completeness limit is M_V ~ -4.1. We construct a uniform set of PAndAS photometric measurements for all known GCs outside R_proj = 25$ kpc, and any new GCs within this radius. With these data we update results from Huxor et al. (2011), investigating the luminosity function (LF), colours and effective radii of M31 GCs with a particular focus on the remote halo. We find that the GCLF is clearly bimodal in the outer halo (R_proj > 30 kpc), with the secondary peak at M_V ~ -5.5. We argue that the GCs in this peak have most likely been accreted along with their host dwarf galaxies. Notwithstanding, we also find, as in previous surveys, a substantial number of GCs with above-average luminosity in the outer M31 halo - a population with no clear counterpart in the Milky Way.
  • We undertake the first detailed analysis of the stellar population and spatial properties of a diffuse substructure in the outer halo of M31. The South-West Cloud lies at a projected distance of ~100 kpc from the centre of M31, and extends for at least ~50 kpc in projection. We use Pan-Andromeda Archaeological Survey photometry of red giant branch stars to determine a distance to the South-West Cloud of 793 +/- 45 kpc. The metallicity of the cloud is found to be [Fe/H] = -1.3 +/- 0.1. This is consistent with the coincident globular clusters PAndAS-7 and PAndAS-8, which have metallicities determined using an independent technique of [Fe/H] = -1.35 +/- 0.15. We measure a brightness for the Cloud of M_V = -12.1 mag; this is ~75 per cent of the luminosity implied by the luminosity-metallicity relation. Under the assumption that the South-West Cloud is the visible remnant of an accreted dwarf satellite, this suggests that the progenitor object was amongst M31's brightest dwarf galaxies prior to disruption.
  • Using data from the Pan-Andromeda Archaeological Survey (PAndAS), we have discovered four new globular clusters (GCs) associated with the M31 dwarf elliptical (dE) satellites NGC 147 and NGC 185. Three of these are associated with NGC 147 and one with NGC 185. All lie beyond the main optical boundaries of the galaxies and are the most remote clusters yet known in these systems. Radial velocities derived from low resolution spectra are used to argue that the GCs are bound to the dwarfs and are not part of the M31 halo population. Combining PAndAS with UKIRT/WFCAM data, we present the first homogeneous optical and near-IR photometry for the entire GC systems of these dEs. Colour-colour plots and published colour-metallicity relations are employed to constrain GC ages and metallicities. It is demonstrated that the clusters are in general metal poor ([Fe/H] < -1.25 dex), while the ages are more difficult to constrain. The mean (V-I)$_0$ colours of the two GC systems are very similar to those of the GC systems of dEs in the Virgo and Fornax clusters, as well as the extended halo GC population in M31. The new clusters bring the GC specific frequency (S_N) to ~9 in NGC 147 and ~5 in NGC 185, consistent with values found for dEs of similar luminosity residing in a range of environments.
  • In this paper we present high resolution VLT/FLAMES observations of red giant stars in the massive intermediate-age Large Magellanic Cloud star cluster NGC 1846, which, on the basis of its extended main-sequence turn-off (EMSTO), possesses an internal age spread of ~300 Myr. We describe in detail our target selection and data reduction procedures, and construct a sample of 21 stars possessing radial velocities indicating their membership of NGC 1846 at high confidence. We consider high-resolution spectra of the planetary nebula Mo-17, and conclude that this object is also a member of the cluster. Our measured radial velocities allow us to conduct a detailed investigation of the internal kinematics of NGC 1846, the first time this has been done for an EMSTO system. The key result of this work is that the cluster exhibits a significant degree of systemic rotation, of a magnitude comparable to the mean velocity dispersion. Using an extensive suite of Monte Carlo models we demonstrate that, despite our relatively small sample size and the substantial fraction of unresolved binary stars in the cluster, the rotation signal we detect is very likely to be genuine. Our observations are in qualitative agreement with the predictions of simulations modeling the formation of multiple populations of stars in globular clusters, where a dynamically cold, rapidly rotating second generation is a common feature. NGC 1846 is less than one relaxation time old, so any dynamical signatures encoded during its formation ought to remain present.
  • We present a structural analysis of halo star clusters in M31 based on deep Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) imaging. The clusters in our sample span a range in galactocentric projected distance from 13 to 100 kpc and thus reside in rather remote environments. Ten of the clusters are classical globulars, while four are from the Huxor et al. (2005, 2008) population of extended, old clusters. For most clusters, contamination by M31 halo stars is slight, and so the profiles can be mapped reliably to large radial distances from their centres. We find that the extended clusters are well fit by analytic King (1962) profiles with ~20 parsec core radii and ~100 parsec photometric tidal radii, or by Sersic profiles of index ~1 (i.e. approximately exponential). Most of the classical globulars also have large photometric tidal radii in the range 50-100 parsec, however the King profile is a less good fit in some cases, particularly at small radii. We find 60% of the classical globular clusters exhibit cuspy cores which are reasonably well described by Sersic profiles of index ~2-6. Our analysis also reinforces the finding that luminous classical globulars, with half-light radii <10 parsec, are present out to radii of at least 100 kpc in M31, which is in contrast to the situation in the Milky Way where such clusters (other than the unusual object NGC 2419) are absent beyond 40 kpc.
  • We present J, H, Ks photometry from the the Multi conjugate Adaptive optics Demonstrator (MAD), a visitor instrument at the VLT, of a resolved stellar population in a small crowded field in the bar of the Large Magellanic Cloud near the globular cluster NGC 1928. In a total exposure time of 6, 36 and 20 minutes, magnitude limits were achieved of J \sim 20.5 mag, H \sim 21 mag, and Ks \sim20.5 mag respectively, with S/N> 10. This does not reach the level of the oldest Main Sequence Turnoffs, however the resulting Colour-Magnitude Diagrams are the deepest and most accurate obtained so far in the infrared for the LMC bar. We combined our photometry with deep optical photometry from the Hubble Space Telescope/Advanced Camera for Surveys, which is a good match in spatial resolution. The comparison between synthetic and observed CMDs shows that the stellar population of the field we observed is consistent with the star formation history expected for the LMC bar, and that all combinations of IJHKs filters can, with some care, produce the same results. We used the Red Clump magnitude in Ks to confirm the LMC distance modulus as, {\mu}0=18.50\pm0.06r \pm0.09s mag. We also addressed a number of technical aspects related to performing accurate photometry with adaptive optics images in crowded stellar fields, which has implications for how we should design and use the Extremely Large Telescopes of the future for studies of this kind.
  • Following on from our discovery of a significant population of M31 outer halo globular clusters (GCs), and updates to the Revised Bologna Catalogue of M31 GCs, we investigate the GC system of M31 out to an unprecedented radius (~120kpc). We derive various ensemble properties, including the magnitude, colour and metallicity distributions, as well as the GC number density profile. One of our most significant findings is evidence for a flattening in the radial GC number density profile in the outer halo. Intriguingly, this occurs at a galactocentric radius of ~2 degrees (~30 kpc) which is the radius at which the underlying stellar halo surface density has also been shown to flatten. The GCs which lie beyond this radius are remarkably uniform in terms of their blue (V-I)o colours, consistent with them belonging to an ancient population with little to no metallicity gradient. Structural parameters are also derived for a sample of 13 newly-discovered extended clusters (ECs) and we find the lowest luminosity ECs have magnitudes and sizes similar to Palomar-type GCs in the Milky Way halo. We argue that our findings provide strong support for a scenario in which a significant fraction of the outer halo GC population of M31 has been accreted.
  • We present H- and Ks-band imaging of three fields at the centre of 30 Doradus in the Large Magellanic Cloud, obtained as part of the Science Demonstration programme with the Multi-conjugate Adaptive optics Demonstrator (MAD) at the Very Large Telescope. Strehl ratios of 15-30% were achieved in the Ks-band, yielding near-infrared images of this dense and complex region at unprecedented angular resolution at these wavelengths. The MAD data are used to construct a near-infrared luminosity profile for R136, the cluster at the core of 30 Dor. Using cluster profiles of the form used by Elson et al., we find the surface brightness can be fit by a relatively shallow power-law function (gamma~1.5-1.7) over the full extent of the MAD data, which extends to a radius of ~40" (~10pc). We do not see compelling evidence for a break in the luminosity profile as seen in optical data in the literature, arguing that cluster asymmetries are the dominant source, although extinction effects and stars from nearby triggered star-formation likely also contribute. These results highlight the need to consider cluster asymmetries and multiple spatial components in interpretation of the luminosity profiles of distant unresolved clusters. We also investigate seven candidate young stellar objects reported by Gruendl & Chu from Spitzer observations, six of which have apparent counterparts in the MAD images. The most interesting of these (GC09: 053839.24-690552.3) appears related to a striking bow-shock--like feature, orientated away from both R136 and the Wolf-Rayet star Brey 75, at distances of 19.5" and 8" (4.7 and 1.9pc in projection), respectively.
  • We report on deep imaging of a remote M31 globular cluster, MGC1, obtained with Gemini/GMOS. Our colour-magnitude diagram for this object extends ~5 magnitudes below the tip of the red giant branch and exhibits features consistent with an ancient metal-poor stellar population, including a long, well-populated horizontal branch. The red giant branch locus suggests MGC1 has a metal abundance [M/H] ~ -2.3. We measure the distance to MGC1 and find that it lies ~160 kpc in front of M31 with a distance modulus of 23.95 +/- 0.06. Combined with its large projected separation of 117 kpc from M31 this implies a deprojected radius of Rgc = 200 +/- 20 kpc, rendering it the most isolated known globular cluster in the Local Group by some considerable margin. We construct a radial brightness profile for MGC1 and show that it is both centrally compact and rather luminous, with Mv = -9.2. Remarkably, the cluster profile shows no evidence for a tidal limit and we are able to trace it to a radius of at least 450 pc, and possibly as far as ~900 pc. The profile exhibits a power-law fall-off with exponent -2.5, breaking to -3.5 in its outermost parts. This core-halo structure is broadly consistent with expectations derived from numerical models, and suggests that MGC1 has spent many gigayears in isolation.
  • We present a spectroscopic survey of candidate red giant branch stars in the extended star cluster, EC4, discovered in the halo of M31 from our CFHT/MegaCam survey, overlapping the tidal streams, Stream Cp and Stream Cr. These observations used the DEep Imaging Multi-Object Spectrograph (DEIMOS) mounted on the Keck II telescope to obtain spectra around the CaII triplet region with ~1.3 Angstroms resolution. Six stars lying on the red giant branch within 2 core-radii of the centre of EC4 are found to have an average vr=-287.9^{+1.9}_{-2.4}km/s and velocity dispersion of 2.7^{+4.2}_{-2.7}km/s, taking instrumental errors into account. The resulting mass-to-light ratio for EC4 is M/L=6.7^{+15}_{-6.7}Msun/Lsun, a value that is consistent with a globular cluster within the 1 sigma errors we derive. From the summed spectra of our member stars, we find EC4 to be metal-poor, with [Fe/H]=-1.6+/-0.15. We discuss several formation and evolution scenarios which could account for our kinematic and metallicity constraints on EC4, and conclude that EC4 is most comparable with an extended globular cluster. We also compare the kinematics and metallicity of EC4 with Stream Cp and Stream Cr, and find that EC4 bears a striking resemblance to Stream Cp in terms of velocity, and that the two structures are identical in terms of both their spectroscopic and photometric metallicities. From this we conclude that EC4 is likely related to Stream Cp.
  • We present a high precision photometric view of the stellar populations in the outer halo of M31, using data taken with the Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys (HST/ACS). We analyse the field populations adjacent to 11 luminous globular clusters which sample the galactocentric radial range 18 < R < 100 kpc and reach a photometric depth of ~2.5 magnitudes below the horizontal branch (m_F814W ~27 mag). The colour-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) are well populated out to ~60 kpc and exhibit relatively metal-rich red giant branches, with the densest fields also showing evidence for prominent red clumps. We use the Dartmouth isochrones to construct metallicity distribution functions (MDFs) which confirm the presence of dominant populations with <[Fe/H]> = -0.6 to -1.0 dex and considerable metallicity dispersions of 0.2 to 0.3 dex (assuming a 10 Gyr population and scaled-Solar abundances). The average metallicity over the range 30 - 60 kpc is [Fe/H] = -0.8 +/- 0.14 dex, with no evidence for a significant radial gradient. Metal-poor stars ([Fe/H] <= -1.3) typically account for < 10-20 % of the population in each field, irrespective of radius. Assuming our fields are unbiased probes of the dominant stellar populations in these parts, we find that the M31 outer halo remains considerably more metal-rich than that of the Milky Way out to at least 60 kpc.
  • Recent observational studies of intermediate-age star clusters (SCs) in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) have reported that a significant number of these objects show double main-sequence turn-offs (DMSTOs) in their color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs). One plausible explanation for the origin of these DMSTOs is that the SCs are composed of two different stellar populations with age differences of ~ 300 Myr. Based on analytical methods and numerical simulations, we explore a new scenario in which SCs interact and merge with star-forming giant molecular clouds (GMCs) to form new composite SCs with two distinct component populations. In this new scenario, the possible age differences between the two different stellar populations responsible for the DMSTOs are due largely to secondary star formation within GMCs interacting and merging with already-existing SCs in the LMC disk. The total gas masses being converted into new stars (i.e., the second generation of stars) during GMC-SC interaction and merging can be comparable to or larger than the masses of the original SCs (i.e, the first generation of stars) in this scenario. Our simulations show that the spatial distributions of new stars in composite SCs formed from GMC-SC merging are more compact than those of stars initially in the SCs. We discuss both advantages and disadvantages of the new scenario in explaining fundamental properties of SCs with DMSTOs in the LMC and in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). We also discuss the merits of various alternative scenarios for the origin of the DMSTOs.
  • The presence of blue straggler stars (BSs) in star clusters has proven a challenge to conventional simple stellar population (SSP) models. Conventional SSP models are based on the evolution theory of single stars. Meanwhile, the typical locations of BSs in the colour-magnitude diagram of a cluster are brighter and bluer than the main sequence turn-off point. Such loci cannot be predicted by single-star evolution theory. However, stars with such properties contribute significantly to the integrated light of the cluster. In this paper, we reconstruct the integrated properties of the Large Magellanic Cloud cluster ESO 121-SC03, based on a detailed exploration of the individual cluster stars, and with particular emphasis on the cluster's BSs. We find that the integrated light properties of ESO 121-SC03 are dramatically modified by its BS component. The integrated spectral energy distribution (ISED) flux level is significantly enhanced toward shorter wavelengths, and all broad-band colours become bluer. When fitting the fully integrated ISED of this cluster based on conventional SSP models, the best-fitting values of age and metallicity are significantly underestimated compared to the true cluster parameters. The age underestimate is $\sim40$ per cent if we only include the BSs within the cluster's half-light radius and $\sim60$ per cent if all BSs are included. The corresponding underestimates of the cluster's metallicity are $\sim30$ and $\sim60$ per cent, respectively. The populous star clusters in the Magellanic Clouds are ideal objects to explore the potential importance of BSs for the integrated light properties of more distant unresolved star clusters in a statistically robust manner, since they cover a large range in age and metallicity.