• In this work we present spectra of all $\gamma$-ray burst (GRB) afterglows that have been promptly observed with the X-shooter spectrograph until 31-03-2017. In total, we obtained spectroscopic observations of 103 individual GRBs observed within 48 hours of the GRB trigger. Redshifts have been measured for 97 per cent of these, covering a redshift range from 0.059 to 7.84. Based on a set of observational selection criteria that minimize biases with regards to intrinsic properties of the GRBs, the follow-up effort has been focused on producing a homogeneous sample of 93 afterglow spectra for GRBs discovered by the Swift satellite. We here provide a public release of all the reduced spectra, including continuum estimates and telluric absorption corrections. For completeness, we also provide reductions for the 18 late-time observations of the underlying host galaxies. We provide an assessment of the degree of completeness with respect to the parent GRB population, in terms of the X-ray properties of the bursts in the sample and find that the sample presented here is representative of the full Swift sample. We constrain the fraction of dark bursts to be < 28 per cent and we confirm previous results that higher optical darkness is correlated with increased X-ray absorption. For the 42 bursts for which it is possible, we provide a measurement of the neutral hydrogen column density, increasing the total number of published HI column density measurements by $\sim$ 33 per cent. This dataset provides a unique resource to study the ISM across cosmic time, from the local progenitor surroundings to the intervening universe.
  • We present high-resolution spectroscopic observations of the fast nova ASASSN-16kt (V407 Lup). A close inspection of spectra obtained at early stages has revealed the presence of low-ionization lines, and among the others we have identified the presence of the ionised $^7$Be doublet in a region relatively free from possible contaminants. After studying their intensities, we have inferred that ASASSN-16kt has produced (5.9 - 7.7)$ \times 10^{-9}$ M$_{\odot}$ of $^7$Be. The identification of bright Ne lines may suggest that the nova progenitor is a massive (1.2 M$_{\odot}$) oxygen-neon white dwarf. The high outburst frequency of oxygen-neon novae implies that they likely produce an amount of Be similar, if not larger, to that produced by carbon-oxygen novae, then confirming that classical novae are among the main factories of lithium in the Galaxy.
  • The binary neutron star merger GW170817 was the first multi-messenger event observed in both gravitational and electromagnetic waves. The electromagnetic signal began ~ 2 seconds after the merger with a weak, short burst of gamma-rays, which was followed over the course of the next hours and days by the ultraviolet, optical and near-infrared emission from a radioactively-powered kilonova. The low luminosity of the gamma-rays and the rising radio and X-ray flux from the source at late times could indicate that we are viewing this event outside the opening angle of the beamed relativistic jet launched during the merger. Alternatively, the emission could be arising from a cocoon of material formed from the interaction between a (possibly choked) jet and the merger ejecta. Here we present late-time optical detections and deep near-infrared limits on the emission from GW170817 at 110 days after the merger. Our new observations are at odds with expectations of late-time emission from kilonova models, being too bright and blue. Instead, this late-time optical emission arises from the optical afterglow of GRB 170817A, associated with GW170817. This emission matches the expectations of a structured relativistic jet, that would have launched a high luminosity short GRB to an aligned observer. The distinct predictions for the future optical behaviour in the structured-jet and cocoon models will directly distinguish the origin of the emission.
  • We here present the spectroscopic follow-up observations with VLT/X-shooter of the Swift long-duration gamma-ray burst GRB 160804A at z = 0.737. Typically, GRBs are found in low-mass, metal-poor galaxies which constitute the sub-luminous population of star-forming galaxies. For the host galaxy of the GRB presented here we derive a stellar mass of $\log(M_*/M_{\odot}) = 9.80\pm 0.07$, a roughly solar metallicity (12+log(O/H) = $8.74\pm 0.12$) based on emission line diagnostics, and an infrared luminosity of $M_{3.6/(1+z)} = -21.94$ mag, but find it to be dust-poor ($E(B-V) < 0.05$ mag). This establishes the galaxy hosting GRB 160804A as one of the most luminous, massive and metal-rich GRB hosts at z < 1.5. Furthermore, the gas-phase metallicity is found to be representative of the physical conditions of the gas close to the explosion site of the burst. The high metallicity of the host galaxy is also observed in absorption, where we detect several strong FeII transitions as well as MgII and MgI. While host galaxy absorption features are common in GRB afterglow spectra, we detect absorption from strong metal lines directly in the host continuum (at a time when the afterglow was contributing to < 15%). Finally, we discuss the possibility that the geometry and state of the absorbing and emitting gas is indicative of a galactic scale outflow expelled at the final stage of two merging galaxies.
  • The SUperluminous Supernova Host galaxIES (SUSHIES) survey aims to provide strong new constraints on the progenitors of superluminous supernovae (SLSNe) by understanding the relationship to their host galaxies. We present the photometric properties of 53 H-poor and 16 H-rich SLSN host galaxies out to $z\sim4$. We model their spectral energy distributions to derive physical properties, which we compare with other galaxy populations. At low redshift, H-poor SLSNe are preferentially found in very blue, low-mass galaxies with high average specific star-formation rates. As redshift increases, the host population follows the general evolution of star-forming galaxies towards more luminous galaxies. After accounting for secular evolution, we find evidence for differential evolution in galaxy mass, but not in the $B$-band and the far UV luminosity ($3\sigma$ confidence). Most remarkable is the scarcity of hosts with stellar masses above $10^{10}~M_\odot$ for both classes of SLSNe. In the case of H-poor SLSNe, we attribute this to a stifled production efficiency above $\sim0.4$ solar metallicity. However, we argue that, in addition to low metallicity, a short-lived stellar population is also required to regulate the SLSN production. H-rich SLSNe are found in a very diverse population of star-forming galaxies. Still, the scarcity of massive hosts suggests a stifled production efficiency above $\sim0.8$ solar metallicity. The large dispersion of the H-rich SLSNe host properties is in stark contrast to those of gamma-ray burst, regular core-collapse SN, and H-poor SLSNe host galaxies. We propose that multiple progenitor channels give rise to this sub-class.
  • We report the discovery and monitoring of the near-infrared counterpart (AT2017gfo) of a binary neutron-star merger event detected as a gravitational wave source by Advanced LIGO/Virgo (GW170817) and as a short gamma-ray burst by Fermi/GBM and Integral/SPI-ACS (GRB170817A). The evolution of the transient light is consistent with predictions for the behaviour of a "kilonova/macronova", powered by the radioactive decay of massive neutron-rich nuclides created via r-process nucleosynthesis in the neutron-star ejecta. In particular, evidence for this scenario is found from broad features seen in Hubble Space Telescope infrared spectroscopy, similar to those predicted for lanthanide dominated ejecta, and the much slower evolution in the near-infrared Ks-band compared to the optical. This indicates that the late-time light is dominated by high-opacity lanthanide-rich ejecta, suggesting nucleosynthesis to the 3rd r-process peak (atomic masses A~195). This discovery confirms that neutron-star mergers produce kilo-/macronovae and that they are at least a major - if not the dominant - site of rapid neutron capture nucleosynthesis in the universe.
  • Here we present an integral-field study of the massive, high-metallicity spiral NGC 3191, the host of SN 2017egm, the closest SLSN Type I to date. We use data from PMAS/CAHA and the public MaNGA survey to shed light on the properties of the SLSN site and the origin of star-formation in this non-starburst spiral galaxy. We map the physical properties different \ion{H}{II} regions throughout the galaxy and characterize their stellar populations using the STARLIGHT fitting code. Kinematical information allows to study a possible interaction with its neighbouring galaxy as the origin of recent star formation activity which could have caused the SLSN. NGC 3191 shows intense star-formation in the western part with three large SF regions of low metallicity. The central regions of the host have a higher metallicity, lower specific star-formation rate and lower ionization. Modeling the stellar populations gives a different picture: The SLSN region has two dominant stellar populations with different ages, the youngest one with an age of 2-10 Myr and lower metallicity, likely the population from which the SN progenitor originated. Emission line kinematics of NGC 3191 show indications of interaction with its neighbour MCG+08-19-017 at $\sim$45 kpc, which might be responsible for the recent starburst. In fact, this galaxy pair has in total hosted 4 SNe, 1988B (Type Ia), SN 2003ds (Type Ic in MCG+08-19-017), PTF10bgl (SLSN-Type II) and 2017egm, underlying the enhanced SF in both galaxies due to interaction. Our study shows that one has to be careful interpreting global host and even gas properties without looking at the stellar population history of the region. SLSNe seem to still be consistent with massive stars ($>$ 20 M$_\odot$) requiring low ($< 0.6Z_{\odot}$) metallicity and those environments can also occur in massive, late-type galaxies but not necessarily starbursts.
  • We present a comprehensive study of the relations between gas kinematics, metallicity, and stellar mass in a sample of 82 GRB-selected galaxies using absorption and emission methods. We find the velocity widths of both emission and absorption profiles to be a proxy of stellar mass. We also investigate the velocity-metallicity correlation and its evolution with redshift and find the correlation derived from emission lines to have a significantly smaller scatter compared to that found using absorption lines. Using 33 GRB hosts with measured stellar mass and metallicitiy, we study the mass-metallicity relation for GRB host galaxies in a stellar mass range of $10^{8.2} M_{\odot}$ to $10^{11.1} M_{\odot}$ and a redshift range of $ z\sim 0.3-3.4$. The GRB-selected galaxies appear to track the mass-metallicity relation of star forming galaxies but with an offset of 0.15 towards lower metallicities. This offset is comparable with the average error-bar on the metallicity measurements of the GRB sample and also the scatter on the MZ relation of the general population. It is hard to decide whether this relatively small offset is due to systematic effects or the intrinsic nature of GRB hosts. We also investigate the possibility of using absorption-line metallicity measurements of GRB hosts to study the mass-metallicity relation at high redshifts. Our analysis shows that the metallicity measurements from absorption methods can significantly differ from emission metallicities and assuming identical measurements from the two methods may result in erroneous conclusions.
  • Previous studies have shown that the incidence rate of intervening strong MgII absorbers towards GRBs were a factor of 2 - 4 higher than towards quasars. Exploring the similar sized and uniformly selected legacy data sets XQ-100 and XSGRB, each consisting of 100 quasar and 81 GRB afterglow spectra obtained with a single instrument (VLT/X-shooter), we demonstrate that there is no disagreement in the number density of strong MgII absorbers with rest-frame equivalent widths $W_r^{2796} >$ 1 {\AA} towards GRBs and quasars in the redshift range 0.1 < z < 5. With large and similar sample sizes, and path length coverages of $\Delta$z = 57.8 and 254.4 for GRBs and quasars, respectively, the incidences of intervening absorbers are consistent within 1 sigma uncertainty levels at all redshifts. For absorbers at z < 2.3 the incidence towards GRBs is a factor of 1.5$\pm$0.4 higher than the expected number of strong MgII absorbers in SDSS quasar spectra, while for quasar absorbers observed with X-shooter we find an excess factor of 1.4$\pm$0.2 relative to SDSS quasars. Conversely, the incidence rates agree at all redshifts with reported high spectral resolution quasar data, and no excess is found. The only remaining discrepancy in incidences is between SDSS MgII catalogues and high spectral resolution studies. The rest-frame equivalent width distribution also agrees to within 1 sigma uncertainty levels between the GRB and quasar samples. Intervening strong MgII absorbers towards GRBs are therefore neither unusually frequent, nor unusually strong.
  • The low distance, $z=0.0591$, of GRB 100316D and its association with SN 2010bh represent two important motivations for studying this host galaxy and the GRB's immediate environment with the Integral-Field Spectrographs like VLT/MUSE. Its large field-of-view allows us to create 2D maps of gas metallicity, ionization level, and the star-formation rate distribution maps, as well as to investigate the presence of possible host companions. The host is a late-type dwarf irregular galaxy with multiple star-forming regions and an extended central region with signatures of on-going shock interactions. The GRB site is characterized by the lowest metallicity, the highest star-formation rate and the youngest ($\sim$ 20-30 Myr) stellar population in the galaxy, which suggest a GRB progenitor stellar population with masses up to 20 -- 40 $M_{\odot}$. We note that the GRB site has an offset of $\sim$660pc from the most luminous SF region in the host. The observed SF activity in this galaxy may have been triggered by a relatively recent gravitational encounter between the host and a small undetected ($L_{H\alpha} \leq 10^{36}$ erg/s) companion.
  • We reveal multiple components of an interacting galaxy system at $z\approx3.35$ through a detailed analysis of the exquisite high-resolution Keck/HIRES spectrum of the afterglow of a gamma-ray burst (GRB). Through Voigt-profile fitting of absorption lines from the Lyman-series, we constrain the neutral hydrogen column density to $N_{\mathrm{HI}} \leq 10^{18.35}$ cm$^{-2}$ for the densest of four distinct systems at the host redshift of GRB~080810, among the lowest $N_{\mathrm{HI}}$ ever observed in a GRB host, despite the line of sight passing within a projected 5 kpc of the galaxy centres. By detailed analysis of the corresponding metal absorption lines, we derive chemical, ionic and kinematic properties of the individual absorbing systems, and thus build a picture of the host as a whole. Striking differences between the systems imply that the line of sight passes through several phases of gas: the star-forming regions of the GRB host; enriched material in the form of a galactic outflow; the hot and ionised halo of a second, interacting galaxy falling towards the host at a line-of-sight velocity of 700 km s$^{-1}$; and a cool, metal-poor cloud which may represent one of the best candidates yet for the inflow of metal-poor gas from the intergalactic medium.
  • It is notoriously difficult to localize short $\gamma$-ray bursts (sGRBs) and their hosts to measure their redshifts. These measurements, however, are critical to constrain the nature of sGRB progenitors, their redshift distribution and the $r$-process element enrichment history of the universe. Here, we present spectroscopy of the host galaxy of GRB111117A and measure its redshift to be $z = 2.211$. This makes GRB111117A the most distant high-confidence short duration GRB detected to date. Our spectroscopic redshift supersedes a lower, previously estimated photometric redshift value for this burst. We use the spectroscopic redshift, as well as new imaging data to constrain the nature of the host galaxy and the physical parameters of the GRB. The rest-frame X-ray derived hydrogen column density, for example, is the highest compared to a complete sample of sGRBs and seems to follow the evolution with redshift as traced by the hosts of long GRBs (lGRBs). The host lies in the brighter end of the expected sGRB host brightness distribution at $z = 2.211$, and is actively forming stars. Using the host as a benchmark for redshift determination, we find that between 43 and 71 per cent of all sGRB redshifts should be missed due to host faintness for hosts at $z\sim2$. The high redshift of GRB111117A is evidence against a lognormal delay-time model for sGRBs through the predicted redshift distribution of sGRBs, which is very sensitive to high-$z$ sGRBs. From the age of the universe at the time of GRB explosion, an initial neutron star (NS) separation of $a_0 < 3.2~R_\odot$ is required in the case where the progenitor system is a circular pair of inspiralling NSs. This constraint excludes some of the longest sGRB formation channels for this burst.
  • Since the first discovery of a broad-lined type Ic supernova (SN) with a long-duration gamma-ray burst (GRB) in 1998, fewer than fifty gamma-ray burst supernovae (GRB-SNe) have been discovered. The intermediate-luminosity Swift GRB 161219B and its associated supernova SN 2016jca, which occurred at a redshift of z=0.1475, represents only the seventh GRB-SN to have been discovered within 1 Gpc, and hence provides an excellent opportunity to investigate the observational and physical properties of these very elusive and rare type of SN. As such, we present optical to near-infrared photometry and optical spectroscopy of GRB 161219B and SN 2016jca, spanning the first three months since its discovery. GRB 161219B exploded in the disk of an edge-on spiral galaxy at a projected distance of 3.4 kpc from the galactic centre. GRB 161219B itself is an outlier of the Amati relation, while SN 2016jca had a rest-frame, peak absolute V-band magnitude of M_V = -19.0, which it reached after 12.5 rest-frame days. We find that the bolometric properties of SN 2016jca are inconsistent with being powered solely by a magnetar central engine, as proposed by other authors, and demonstrate that it was likely powered exclusively by energy deposited by the radioactive decay of nickel and cobalt into their daughter products, which were nucleosynthesized when its progenitor underwent core collapse. We find that 0.22 solar masses of nickel is required to reproduce the peak luminosity of SN 2016jca, and we constrain an ejecta mass of 5.8 solar masses and a kinetic energy of ~5 x 10^52 erg. Finally, we report on a chromatic, pre-maximum bump in the g-band light curve, and discuss its possible origin. [Abridged]
  • Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are powerful probes of early stars and galaxies, during and potentially even before the era of reionization. Although the number of GRBs identified at z>6 remains small, they provide a unique window on typical star-forming galaxies at that time, and thus are complementary to deep field observations. We report the identification of the optical drop-out afterglow of Swift GRB 120923A in near-infrared Gemini-North imaging, and derive a redshift of z=7.84_{-0.12}^{+0.06} from VLT/X-shooter spectroscopy. At this redshift the peak 15-150 keV luminosity of the burst was 3.2x10^52 erg/s, and in fact the burst was close to the Swift/BAT detection threshold. The X-ray and near-infrared afterglow were also faint, and in this sense it was a rather typical long-duration GRB in terms of rest-frame luminosity. We present ground- and space-based follow-up observations spanning from X-ray to radio, and find that a standard external shock model with a constant-density circumburst environment with density, n~4x10^-2 cm^-3 gives a good fit to the data. The near-infrared light curve exhibits a sharp break at t~3.4 days in the observer frame, which if interpreted as being due to a jet corresponds to an opening angle of ~5 degrees. The beaming corrected gamma-ray energy is then E_gamma~2x10^50 erg, while the beaming-corrected kinetic energy is lower, E_K~10^49 erg, suggesting that GRB 120923A was a comparatively low kinetic energy event. We discuss the implications of this event for our understanding of the high-redshift population of GRBs and their identification.
  • When a star passes within the tidal radius of a supermassive black hole, it will be torn apart. For a star with the mass of the Sun ($M_\odot$) and a non-spinning black hole with a mass $<10^8 M_\odot$, the tidal radius lies outside the black hole event horizon and the disruption results in a luminous flare. Here we report observations over a period of 10 months of a transient, hitherto interpreted as a superluminous supernova. Our data show that the transient rebrightened substantially in the ultraviolet and that the spectrum went through three different spectroscopic phases without ever becoming nebular. Our observations are more consistent with a tidal disruption event than a superluminous supernova because of the temperature evolution, the presence of highly ionised CNO gas in the line of sight and our improved localisation of the transient in the nucleus of a passive galaxy, where the presence of massive stars is highly unlikely. While the supermassive black hole has a mass $> 10^8 M_\odot$, a star with the same mass as the Sun could be disrupted outside the event horizon if the black hole were spinning rapidly. The rapid spin and high black hole mass can explain the high luminosity of this event.
  • We present the extensive follow-up campaign on the afterglow of GRB 110715A at 17 different wavelengths, from X-ray to radio bands, starting 81 seconds after the burst and extending up to 74 days later. We performed for the first time a GRB afterglow observation with the ALMA observatory. We find that the afterglow of GRB 110715A is very bright at optical and radio wavelengths. We use optical and near infrared spectroscopy to provide further information about the progenitor's environment and its host galaxy. The spectrum shows weak absorption features at a redshift z = 0.8225, which reveal a host galaxy environment with low ionization, column density and dynamical activity. Late deep imaging shows a very faint galaxy, consistent with the spectroscopic results. The broadband afterglow emission is modelled with synchrotron radiation using a numerical algorithm and we determine the best fit parameters using Bayesian inference in order to constrain the physical parameters of the jet and the medium in which the relativistic shock propagates. We fitted our data with a variety of models, including different density profiles and energy injections. Although the general behaviour can be roughly described by these models, none of them are able to fully explain all data points simultaneously. GRB 110715A shows the complexity of reproducing extensive multi-wavelength broadband afterglow observations, and the need of good sampling in wavelength and time and more complex models to accurately constrain the physics of GRB afterglows.
  • SOXS (Son Of X-Shooter) will be a unique spectroscopic facility for the ESO-NTT 3.5-m telescope in La Silla (Chile), able to cover the optical/NIR band (350-1750 nm). The design foresees a high-efficiency spectrograph with a resolution-slit product of ~4,500, capable of simultaneously observing the complete spectral range 350 - 1750 nm with a good sensitivity, with light imaging capabilities in the visible band. This paper outlines the status of the project.
  • Very massive stars in the final phases of their lives often show unpredictable outbursts that can mimic supernovae, so-called, "SN impostors", but the distinction is not always straigthforward. Here we present observations of a luminous blue variable (LBV) in NGC 2770 in outburst over more than 20 years that experienced a possible terminal explosion as type IIn SN in 2015, named SN 2015bh. This possible SN or "main event" was preceded by a precursor peaking $\sim$ 40 days before maximum. The total energy release of the main event is $\sim$1.8$\times$10$^{49}$ erg, which can be modeled by a $<$ 0.5 M$_\odot$ shell plunging into a dense CSM. All emission lines show a single narrow P-Cygni profile during the LBV phase and a double P-Cygni profile post maximum suggesting an association of this second component with the possible SN. Since 1994 the star has been redder than during a typical S-Dor like outburst. SN 2015bh lies within a spiral arm of NGC 2770 next to a number of small star-forming regions with a metallicity of $\sim$ 0.5 solar and a stellar population age of 7-10 Myr. SN 2015bh shares many similarities with SN 2009ip, which, together with other examples may form a new class of objects that exhibit outbursts a few decades prior to "hyper-eruption" or final core-collapse. If the star survives this event it is undoubtedly altered, and we suggest that these "zombie stars" may evolve from an LBV to a Wolf Rayet star over a very short timescale of only a few years. The final fate of these types of massive stars can only be determined with observations years after the possible SN.
  • We present GTC-10.4m spectroscopy and multi-band photometry of the faint (r ~26) optical counterpart of the anomalous X-ray pulsar 4U 0142+61. The 5000 - 9000 Angs spectrum -- the first obtained for a magnetar -- is featureless, allowing us to set an equivalent width upper limit EW < 25 Angs to the presence of emission lines in the Halfa region. Multi-band photometry in the g, r, i, z SDSS bands obtained at different epochs over 12 years shows no significant variability from minutes-to-years time scales. The photometry has been calibrated, for the first time, against the SDSS itself, resulting in solid upper limits to variability ranging from ~0.2 mag in i (over 12 years) to 0.05 mag in z (over 1.5 years). The shape of the optical + near-infrared (literature values) spectral energy distribution is not well constrained due to the high extinction along the line of sight. Using a Markov Chain Monte Carlo analysis we find that it can be described by a power-law with a spectral index beta=-0.7+-0.5 and E_(B-V)=1.5+-0.4. We also discuss on the implications of adding hard X-ray flux values from literature to the spectral fitting.
  • We present rest-frame NIR luminosities and stellar masses for a large and uniformly-selected population of GRB host galaxies using deep Spitzer Space Telescope imaging of 119 targets from the Swift GRB Host Galaxy Legacy Survey spanning 0.03 < z < 6.3, and determine the effects of galaxy evolution and chemical enrichment on the mass distribution of the GRB host population across cosmic history. We find strong evolution in the host luminosity distribution between z~0.5 (median absolute NIR AB magnitude ~ -18.5, corresponding to M* ~ 3x10^8 M_sun and z~1.5), but negligible variation between z~1.5 and z~5 (median magnitude ~ -21.2, corresponding to M* ~ 5x10^9 M_sun). Dust-obscured GRBs dominate the massive host population but are only rarely seen associated with low-mass hosts, indicating that massive star-forming galaxies are universally and (to some extent) homogeneously dusty at high-redshift while low-mass star-forming galaxies retain little dust in their ISM. Comparing our luminosity distributions to field surveys and measurements of the high-z mass-metallicity relation, our results have good consistency with a model in which the GRB rate per unit star-formation is constant in galaxies with gas-phase metallicity below approximately the Solar value but heavily suppressed in more metal-rich environments. This model also naturally explains the previously-reported "excess" in the GRB rate beyond z>2; metals stifle GRB production in most galaxies at z<1.5 but have only minor impact at higher redshifts. The metallicity threshold we infer is much higher than predicted by single-star models and favors a binary progenitor. Our observations also constrain the fraction of cosmic star-formation in low-mass galaxies undetectable to Spitzer to be a small minority at most redshifts (~10% at z~2, ~25% at z~3, and ~50% at z=3.5-6.0).
  • We introduce the Swift Gamma-Ray Burst Host Galaxy Legacy Survey ("SHOALS"), a multi-observatory high-redshift galaxy survey targeting the largest unbiased sample of long-duration gamma-ray burst hosts yet assembled (119 in total). We describe the motivations of the survey and the development of our selection criteria, including an assessment of the impact of various observability metrics on the success rate of afterglow-based redshift measurement. We briefly outline our host-galaxy observational program, consisting of deep Spitzer/IRAC imaging of every field supplemented by similarly-deep, multi-color optical/NIR photometry, plus spectroscopy of events without pre-existing redshifts. Our optimized selection cuts combined with host-galaxy follow-up have so far enabled redshift measurements for 110 targets (92%) and placed upper limits on all but one of the remainder. About 20% of GRBs in the sample are heavily dust-obscured, and at most 2% originate from z>5.5. Using this sample we estimate the redshift-dependent GRB rate density, showing it to peak at z~2.5 and fall by about an order of magnitude towards low (z=0) redshift, while declining more gradually towards high (z~7) redshift. This behavior is consistent with a progenitor whose formation efficiency varies modestly over cosmic history. Our survey will permit the most detailed examination to date of the connection between the GRB host population and general star-forming galaxies, directly measure evolution in the host population over cosmic time and discern its causes, and provide new constraints on the fraction of cosmic star-formation occurring in undetectable galaxies at all redshifts.
  • We report the early discovery of the optical afterglow of gamma-ray burst (GRB) 140801A in the 137 deg$^2$ 3-$\sigma$ error-box of the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM). MASTER is the only observatory that automatically react to all Fermi alerts. GRB 140801A is one of the few GRBs whose optical counterpart was discovered solely from its GBM localization. The optical afterglow of GRB 140801A was found by MASTER Global Robotic Net 53 sec after receiving the alert, making it the fastest optical detection of a GRB from a GBM error-box. Spectroscopy obtained with the 10.4-m Gran Telescopio Canarias and the 6-m BTA of SAO RAS reveals a redshift of $z=1.32$. We performed optical and near-infrared photometry of GRB 140801A using different telescopes with apertures ranging from 0.4-m to 10.4-m. GRB 140801A is a typical burst in many ways. The rest-frame bolometric isotropic energy release and peak energy of the burst is $E_\mathrm{iso} = 5.54_{-0.24}^{+0.26} \times 10^{52}$ erg and $E_\mathrm{p, rest}\simeq280$ keV, respectively, which is consistent with the Amati relation. The absence of a jet break in the optical light curve provides a lower limit on the half-opening angle of the jet $\theta=6.1$ deg. The observed $E_\mathrm{peak}$ is consistent with the limit derived from the Ghirlanda relation. The joint Fermi GBM and Konus-Wind analysis shows that GRB 140801A could belong to the class of intermediate duration. The rapid detection of the optical counterpart of GRB 140801A is especially important regarding the upcoming experiments with large coordinate error-box areas.
  • [Abridged] We present data and initial results from VLT/X-Shooter emission-line spectroscopy of 96 GRB-selected galaxies at 0.1<z<3.6, the largest sample of GRB host spectroscopy available to date. Most of our GRBs were detected by Swift and 76% are at 0.5<z<2.5 with a median z~1.6. Based on Balmer and/or forbidden lines of oxygen, nitrogen, and neon, we measure systemic redshifts, star formation rates (SFRs), visual attenuations, oxygen abundances (12+log(O/H)), and emission-line widths. We find a strong change of the typical physical properties of GRB hosts with redshift. The median SFR, for example, increases from ~0.6 M_sun/yr at z~0.6 up to ~15 M_sun/yr at z~2. A higher ratio of [OIII]/[OII] at higher redshifts leads to an increasing distance of GRB-selected galaxies to the locus of local galaxies in the BPT diagram. Oxygen abundances of the galaxies are distributed between 12+log(O/H)=7.9 and 12+log(O/H)=9.0 with a median of 12+log(O/H)~8.5. The fraction of GRB-selected galaxies with super-solar metallicities is around 20% at z<1 in the adopted metallicity scale. This is significantly less than the fraction of star formation in similar galaxies, illustrating that GRBs are scarce in high-metallicity environments. At z~3, sensitivity limits us to probing only the most luminous GRB hosts for which we derive metallicities of Z ~< 0.5 Z_sun. Together with a high incidence of galaxies with similar metallicity in our sample at z~1.5, this indicates that the metallicity dependence observed at low redshift will not be dominant at z~3.
  • Long gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), among the most energetic events in the Universe, are explosions of massive and short-lived stars, so they pinpoint locations of recent star formation. However, several GRB host galaxies have recently been found to be deficient in molecular gas (H2), believed to be the fuel of star formation. Moreover, optical spectroscopy of GRB afterglows implies that the molecular phase constitutes only a small fraction of the gas along the GRB line-of-sight. Here we report the first ever 21 cm line observations of GRB host galaxies, using the Australia Telescope Compact Array, implying high levels of atomic hydrogen (HI), which suggests that the connection between atomic gas and star formation is stronger than previously thought, with star formation being potentially directly fuelled by atomic gas (or with very efficient HI-to-H2 conversion and rapid exhaustion of molecular gas), as has been theoretically shown to be possible. This can happen in low metallicity gas near the onset of star formation, because cooling of gas (necessary for star formation) is faster than the HI-to-H2 conversion. Indeed, large atomic gas reservoirs, together with low molecular gas masses, stellar and dust masses are consistent with GRB hosts being preferentially galaxies which have very recently started a star formation episode after accreting metal-poor gas from the intergalactic medium. This provides a natural route for forming GRBs in low-metallicity environments. The gas inflow scenario is also consistent with the existence of the companion HI object with no optical counterpart ~19 kpc from the GRB 060505 host, and with the fact that the HI centroids of the GRB 980425 and 060505 hosts do not coincide with optical centres of these galaxies, but are located close to the GRB positions.
  • Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) offer a route to characterizing star-forming galaxies and quantifying high-$z$ star formation that is distinct from the approach of traditional galaxy surveys: GRB selection is independent of dust and probes even the faintest galaxies that can evade detection in flux-limited surveys. However, the exact relation between the GRB rate and the star formation rate (SFR) throughout all redshifts is controversial. The Optically Unbiased GRB Host (TOUGH) survey includes observations of all GRB hosts (69) in an optically unbiased sample of Swift GRBs and we utilize these to constrain the evolution of the UV GRB-host-galaxy luminosity function (LF) between $z=0$ and $z=4.5$, and compare this with LFs derived from both Lyman-break galaxy (LBG) surveys and simulation modeling. At all redshifts we find the GRB hosts to be most consistent with a luminosity function derived from SFR weighted models incorporating GRB production via both metallicity-dependent and independent channels with a relatively high level of bias toward low metallicity hosts. In the range $1<z<3$ an SFR weighted LBG derived (i.e., non-metallicity biased) LF is also a reasonable fit to the data. Between $z\sim3$ and $z\sim6$, we observe an apparent lack of UV bright hosts in comparison with LBGs, though the significance of this shortfall is limited by nine hosts of unknown redshift.