• GravityCam is a new concept of ground-based imaging instrument capable of delivering significantly sharper images from the ground than is normally possible without adaptive optics. Advances in optical and near infrared imaging technologies allow images to be acquired at high speed without significant noise penalty. Aligning these images before they are combined can yield a 2.5 to 3 fold improvement in image resolution. By using arrays of such detectors, survey fields may be as wide as the telescope optics allows. Consequently, GravityCam enables both wide-field high-resolution imaging and high-speed photometry. We describe the instrument and detail its application to provide demographics of planets and satellites down to Lunar mass (or even below) across the Milky Way. GravityCam is also suited to improve the quality of weak shear studies of dark matter distribution in distant clusters of galaxies and multiwavelength follow-ups of background sources that are strongly lensed by galaxy clusters. The photometric data arising from an extensive microlensing survey will also be useful for asteroseismology studies, while GravityCam can be used to monitor fast multiwavelength flaring in accreting compact objects, and promises to generate a unique data set on the population of the Kuiper belt and possibly the Oort cloud.
  • In the framework of a 30-night spectroscopic survey of small near-Earth asteroids (NEAs) we present new results regarding the identification of olivine-rich objects. The following NEAs were classified as A-type using visible spectra obtained with 3.6 m NTT telescope: (293726) 2007 RQ17, (444584) 2006 UK, 2012 NP, 2014 YS34, 2015 HB117, 2015 LH, 2015 TB179, 2015 TW144. We determined a relative abundance of $5.4\% $ (8 out of 147 observed targets) A-types at hundred meter size range of NEAs population. The ratio is at least five times larger compared with the previously known A-types, which represent less than $\sim1\%$ of NEAs taxonomically classified. By taking into account that part of our targets may not be confirmed as olivine-rich asteroids by their near-infrared spectra, or they can have a nebular origin, our result provides an upper-limit estimation of mantle fragments at size ranges bellow 300m. Our findings are compared with the "battered-to-bits" scenario, claiming that at small sizes the olivine-rich objects should be more abundant when compared with basaltic and iron ones.
  • We analyze two multi-chord stellar occultations by Pluto observed on July 18th, 2012 and May 4th, 2013, and monitored respectively from five and six sites. They provide a total of fifteen light-curves, twelve of them being used for a simultaneous fit that uses a unique temperature profile, assuming a clear (no-haze) and pure N_2 atmosphere, but allowing for a possible pressure variation between the two dates. We find a solution that fits satisfactorily (i.e. within the noise level) all the twelve light-curves, providing atmospheric constraints between ~1,190 km (pressure ~ 11 \mubar) and ~ 1,450 km (pressure ~0.1 \mubar) from Pluto's center. Our main results are: (1) the best-fitting temperature profile shows a stratosphere with strong positive gradient between 1,190 km (at 36 K, 11 \mubar) and r = 1,215 km (6.0 \mubar), where a temperature maximum of 110 K is reached; above it is a mesosphere with negative thermal gradient of -0.2 K/km up to ~ 1,390 km (0.25 \mubar), where, the mesosphere connects itself to a more isothermal upper branch around 81 K; (2) the pressure shows a small (6 %) but significant increase (6-\sigma level) between the two dates; (3) without troposphere, Pluto's radius is found to be R_P = 1,190 +/- 5km. Allowing for a troposphere, R_P is constrained to lie between 1,168 and 1,195 km; (4) the currently measured CO abundance is too small to explain the mesospheric negative thermal gradient. Cooling by HCN is possible, but only if this species is largely saturated; Alternative explanations like zonal winds or vertical compositional variations of the atmosphere are unable to explain the observed mesospheric trend.
  • Aims. We seek to constrain the surface composition of the Trans-Neptunian Object (90482) Orcus and its small satellite Vanth, as well as their mass and density. Methods. We acquired near-infrared spectra (1.4-2.4 {\mu}m) of (90482) Orcus and its companion Vanth using the adaptive-optics-fed integral-field spectrograph SINFONI mounted on Yepun/UT4 at the European Southern Observatory Very Large Telescope. We took advantage of a very favorable appulse (separation of only 4") between Orcus and the UCAC2 29643541 star (R = 11.6) to use the adaptive optics mode of SINFONI, allowing both components to be spatially resolved and Vanth colors to be extracted independently from Orcus. Results. The spectrum of Orcus we obtain has the highest signal-to-noise ratio to date, and we confirm the presence of H2O ice in crystalline form, together with the presence of an absorption band at 2.2 {\mu}m. We set an upper limit of about 2% for the presence of methane, and 5% for ethane. Because the methane alone cannot account for the 2.2 {\mu}m band, the presence of ammonia is suggested to the level of a couple of percent. The colors of Vanth are found slightly redder than those of Orcus, but the large measurement uncertainties forbid us from drawing conclusions on the origin of the pair (capture or co-formation). Finally, we reset the orbital phase of Vanth around Orcus, and confirm the orbital parameters derived by Brown et al. (2010, AJ 139).
  • Thermal emission from Kuiper Belt object (136108) Haumea was measured with Herschel-PACS at 100 and 160 micrometers for almost a full rotation period. Observations clearly indicate a 100-micrometer thermal lightcurve with an amplitude of a factor of ~ 2, which is positively correlated with the optical lightcurve. This confirms that both are primarily due to shape effects. A 160-micrometer lightcurve is marginally detected. Radiometric fits of the mean Herschel- and Spitzer- fluxes indicate an equivalent diameter D ~ 1300 km and a geometric albedo p_v ~ 0.70-0.75. These values agree with inferences from the optical lightcurve, supporting the hydrostatic equilibrium hypothesis. The large amplitude of the 100-micrometer lightcurve suggests that the object has a high projected a/b axis ratio (~ 1.3) and a low thermal inertia as well as possible variable infrared beaming. This may point to fine regolith on the surface, with a lunar-type photometric behavior. The quality of the thermal data is not sufficient to clearly detect the effects of a surface dark spot.
  • The goal of the Herschel Open Time Key programme "TNOs are Cool!" is to derive the physical and thermal properties for a large sample of Centaurs and trans-Neptunian objects (TNOs), including resonant, classical, detached and scattered disk objects. We present results for seven targets either observed in PACS point-source, or in mini scan-map mode. Spitzer-MIPS observations were included for three objects. The sizes of these targets range from 100 km to almost 1000 km, five have low geometric albedos below 10%, (145480) 2005 TB190 has a higher albedo above 15%. Classical thermal models driven by an intermediate beaming factor of $\eta$=1.2 or $\eta$-values adjusted to the observed colour temperature fit the multi-band observations well in most cases. More sophisticated thermophysical models give very similar diameter and albedo values for thermal inertias in the range 0-25 Jm-2s-0.5K-1, consistent with very low heat conductivities at temperatures far away from the Sun. The early experience with observing and model strategies will allow us to derive physical and thermal properties for our complete Herschel TNO sample of 140 targets as a benchmark for understanding the solar system debris disk, and extra-solar ones as well.
  • The study of the surface properties of Centaurs and Trans-Neptunian Objects (TNOs) provides essential information about the early conditions and evolution of the outer Solar System. Due to the faintness of most of these distant and icy bodies, photometry currently constitutes the best technique to survey a statistically significant number of them. Our aim is to investigate color properties of a large sample of minor bodies of the outer Solar System, and set their taxonomic classification. We carried out visible and near-infrared photometry of Centaurs and TNOs, making use, respectively, of the FORS2 and ISAAC instruments at the Very Large Telescope (European Southern Observatory). Using G-mode analysis, we derived taxonomic classifications according to the Barucci et al. (2005a) system. We report photometric observations of 31 objects, 10 of them have their colors reported for the first time ever. 28 Centaurs and TNOs have been assigned to a taxon. We combined the entire sample of 38 objects taxonomically classified in the framework of our programme (28 objects from this work; 10 objects from DeMeo et al. 2009a) with previously classified TNOs and Centaurs, looking for correlations between taxonomy and dynamics. We compared our photometric results to literature data, finding hints of heterogeneity for the surfaces of 4 objects.
  • A second large programme (LP) for the physical studies of TNOs and Centaurs, started at ESO Cerro Paranal on October 2006 to obtain high-quality data, has recently been concluded. In this paper we present the spectra of these pristine bodies obtained in the visible range during the last two semesters of the LP. We investigate the spectral behaviour of the TNOs and Centaurs observed, and we analyse the spectral slopes distribution of the full data set coming from this LP and from the literature. We computed the spectral slope for each observed object, and searched for possible weak absorption features. A statistical analysis was performed on a total sample of 73 TNOs and Centaurs to look for possible correlations between dynamical classes, orbital parameters, and spectral gradient. We obtained new spectra for 28 bodies, 15 of which were observed for the first time. All the new presented spectra are featureless, including 2003 AZ84, for which a faint and broad absorption band possibly attributed to hydrated silicates on its surface has been reported. The data confirm a wide variety of spectral behaviours, with neutral--grey to very red gradients. An analysis of the spectral slopes available from this LP and in the literature for a total sample of 73 Centaurs and TNOs shows that there is a lack of very red objects in the classical population. We present the results of the statistical analysis of the spectral slope distribution versus orbital parameters. In particular, we confirm a strong anticorrelation between spectral slope and orbital inclination for the classical population. A strong correlation is also found between the spectral slope and orbital eccentricity for resonant TNOs, with objects having higher spectral slope values with increasing eccentricity.
  • We present the data acquisition strategy and characterization procedures for the Canada-France Ecliptic Plane Survey (CFEPS), a sub-component of the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey. The survey began in early 2003 and as of summer 2005 has covered 430 square degrees of sky within a few degrees of the ecliptic. Moving objects beyond the orbit of Uranus are detected to a magnitude limit of $m_R$=23 -- 24 (depending on the image quality). To track as large a sample as possible and avoid introducing followup bias, we have developed a multi-epoch observing strategy that is spread over several years. We present the evolution of the uncertainties in ephemeris position and orbital elements as the objects progress through the epochs. We then present a small 10-object sample that was tracked in this manner as part of a preliminary survey starting a year before the main CFEPS project. We describe the CFEPS survey simulator, to be released in 2006, which allows theoretical models of the Kuiper Belt to be compared with the survey discoveries since CFEPS has a well-documented pointing history with characterized detection efficiencies as a function of magnitude and rate of motion on the sky. Using the pre-survey objects we illustrate the usage of the simulator in modeling the classical Kuiper Belt.
  • We report on coordinated thermal and optical measurements of trans-Neptunian object (20000) Varuna obtained in January-February 2002, respectively from the IRAM 30-m and IAA 1.5 m telescopes. The optical data show a lightcurve with a period of 3.176+/-0.010 hr, a mean V magnitude of 20.37+/-0.08 and a 0.42+/-0.01 magnitude amplitude. They also tentatively indicate that the lightcurve is asymmetric and double-peaked. The thermal observations indicate a 1.12+/-0.41 mJy flux, averaged over the object's rotation. Combining the two datasets, we infer that Varuna has a mean 1060(+180/-220) km diameter and a mean 0.038(+0.022/-0.010) V geometric albedo, in general agreement with an earlier determination using the same technique.
  • We have started since 1997 the Meudon Multicolor Survey of Outer Solar System Objects with the aim of collecting a large and homogeneous set of color data for Trans-Neptunian and Centaurs objects [...] We have a combined sample of 52 B-R color measurements for 8 Centaurs, 22 Classicals, 13 Plutinos, 8 Scattered objects and 1 object with unidentified dynamical class. This dataset is the largest single and homogeneous published dataset to date [...]. A strong (color) correlation with mean excitation velocity points toward a space weathering/impact origin for the color diversity. However, thorough modeling of the collisional/dynamical environment in the Edgeworth-Kuiper belt needs to be done in order to confirm this scenario. We found also that the Classical TNOs consist in the superposition of two distinct populations: the dynamically Cold Classical TNOs (red colors, low i, small sizes) and the dynamically Hot Classical TNOs (diverse colors, moderate and high i, larger sizes). [...] Our specific observation strategy [...] permitted us to highlight a few objects suspected to have true compositional and/or texture variation on their surfaces. These are 1998 HK151, 1999 DF9, 1999 OY3, 2000 GP183, 2000 OK67, and 2001 KA77 and should be prime targets for further observations [...]. Our survey has also highlighted 1998 SN165 whose colors and dynamical properties puts it in a new dynamical class distinct from the Classicals, its previously assigned dynamical class.
  • We report on observations of two bright Trans-Neptunian Objects (TNOs) - 1999 TC36 and 1998 SN165}- during two observational campaigns, as part of the Meudon Multicolor Survey of Outer Solar System Objects. V-J color was measured for 1999 TC36 (V-J=2.34+/-0.18), which combined with previous measured colors in the visible, indicate a red reflectivity spectrum at all wavelengths. Photometric V-band lightcurves were taken for both objects over a time span of around 8 hours. We have determined a possible rotational period of P=10.1+/-0.8 h for 1998 SN165, making it the seventh TNO with an estimated period. From its lightcurve variation of Dm=0.151(+0.022/-0.030), we have inferred an asymmetry ratio of a/b >=1.148(+0.024/-0.031). For 1999 TC36, we did not detect any rotational period or periodic signal variation within the uncertainties, but the analysis of its lightcurve hints to a slight systematic magnitude decrease.