• Observations by the Atacama Large Millimeter/sub-millimeter Array of the dust continuum and $^{13}$CO(3-2) millimeter emissions of the triple stellar system GG Tau A are analysed, giving evidence for a rotating gas disc and a concentric and coplanar dust ring. The present work complements an earlier analysis (Tang et al. 2016) by exploring detailed properties of the gas disc. A 95% confidence level upper limit of 0.24 arcsec (34 au) is placed on the disc scale height at a distance of 1 arcsec (140 au) from the central stars. Evidence for Keplerian rotation of the gas disc is presented, the rotation velocity reaching ~3.1 kms$^{-1}$ at 1 arcsec from the central stars, and a 99% confidence level upper limit of 9% is placed on a possible in-fall velocity relative contribution. Variations of the intensity across the disc area are studied in detail and confirm the presence of a hot spot in the south-eastern quadrant. However several other significant intensity variations, in particular a depression in the northern direction, are also revealed. Variations of the intensity are found to be positively correlated to variations of the line width. Possible contributions to the measured line width are reviewed, suggesting an increase of the disc temperature and opacity with decreasing distance from the stars.
  • We report new dynamical masses for 5 pre-main sequence (PMS) stars in the L1495 region of the Taurus star-forming region (SFR) and 6 in the L1688 region of the Ophiuchus SFR. Since these regions have VLBA parallaxes these are absolute measurements of the stars' masses and are independent of their effective temperatures and luminosities. Seven of the stars have masses $<0.6$ solar masses, thus providing data in a mass range with little data, and of these, 6 are measured to precision $< 5 \%$. We find 8 stars with masses in the range 0.09 to 1.1 solar mass that agree well with the current generation of PMS evolutionary models. The ages of the stars we measured in the Taurus SFR are in the range 1-3 MY, and $<1$ MY for those in L1688. We also measured the dynamical masses of 14 stars in the ALMA archival data for Akeson~\&~Jensen's Cycle 0 project on binaries in the Taurus SFR. We find that the masses of 7 of the targets are so large that they cannot be reconciled with reported values of their luminosity and effective temperature. We suggest that these targets are themselves binaries or triples.
  • Determining the gas density and temperature structures of protoplanetary disks is a fundamental task to constrain planet formation theories. This is a challenging procedure and most determinations are based on model-dependent assumptions. We attempt a direct determination of the radial and vertical temperature structure of the Flying Saucer disk, thanks to its favorable inclination of 90 degrees. We present a method based on the tomographic study of an edge-on disk. Using ALMA, we observe at 0.5$"$ resolution the Flying Saucer in CO J=2-1 and CS J=5-4. This edge-on disk appears in silhouette against the CO J=2-1 emission from background molecular clouds in $\rho$ Oph. The combination of velocity gradients due to the Keplerian rotation of the disk and intensity variations in the CO background as a function of velocity provide a direct measure of the gas temperature as a function of radius and height above the disk mid-plane. The overall thermal structure is consistent with model predictions, with a cold ($< 15-12 $~K), CO-depleted mid-plane, and a warmer disk atmosphere. However, we find evidence for CO gas along the mid-plane beyond a radius of about 200\,au, coincident with a change of grain properties. Such a behavior is expected in case of efficient rise of UV penetration re-heating the disk and thus allowing CO thermal desorption or favoring direct CO photo-desorption. CO is also detected up to 3-4 scale heights while CS is confined around 1 scale height above the mid-plane. The limits of the method due to finite spatial and spectral resolutions are also discussed. This method appears to be very promising to determine the gas structure of planet-forming disks, provided that the molecular data have an angular resolution which is high enough, of the order of $0.3 - 0.1"$ at the distance of the nearest star forming regions.
  • We present ALMA Cycle~2 observations at $0.5^{\prime\prime}$ resolution of TW Hya of CS $J=5-4$ emission. The radial profile of the integrated line emission displays oscillatory features outwards of $1.5^{\prime\prime}$ ($\approx 90$ au). A dip-like feature at $1.6^{\prime\prime}$ is coincident in location, depth and width with features observed in dust scattered light at near-infrared wavelengths. Using a thermochemical model indicative of TW Hya, gas-grain chemical modelling and non-LTE radiative transfer, we demonstrate that such a feature can be reproduced with a surface density depression, consistent with the modelling performed for scattered light observations of TW Hya. We further demonstrate that a gap in the dust distribution and dust opacity only cannot reproduce the observed CS feature. The outer enhancement at $3.1^{\prime\prime}$ is identified as a region of intensified desorption due to enhanced penetration of the interstellar FUV radiation at the exponential edge of the disk surface density, which intensifies the photochemical processing of gas and ices.
  • Deuterated species are unique and powerful tools in astronomy since they can probe the physical conditions, chemistry, and ionization level of various astrophysical media. Recent observations of several deuterated species along with some of their spin isomeric forms have rekindled the interest for more accurate studies on deuterium fractionation. This paper presents the first publicly available chemical network of multiply deuterated species along with spin chemistry implemented on the latest state-of-the-art gas-grain chemical code `NAUTILUS'. D/H ratios for all deuterated species observed at different positions of TMC-1 are compared with the results of our model, which considers multiply deuterated species along with the spin chemistry of light hydrogen bearing species H2, H2+, H3+ and their isotopologues. We also show the differences in the modeled abundances of non-deuterated species after the inclusion of deuteration and spin chemistry in the model. Finally, we present a list of potentially observable deuterated species in TMC-1 awaiting detection.
  • The increased sensitivity of millimeter-wave facilities now makes possible the detection of low amounts of gas in debris disks. Some of the gas-rich debris disks harbor peculiar properties, with possible pristine gas and secondary generated dust. The origin of the gas in these hybrid disks is strongly debated and the current sample is too sparse to understand this phenomenon. More detections are necessary to increase the statistics on this population. Lying at the final stages of evolution of proto-planetary disks and at the beginning of the debris disk phase, these objects could provide new insight into the processes involved in the making of planetary systems. We carried out a deep survey of the 12CO(2-1) and 12CO(3-2) lines with the APEX and IRAM radiotelescopes in young debris disks selected according to hybrid disk properties. The survey is complemented with a bibliographic study of the ratio between the emission of the gas and the continuum (S_CO/F_cont) in CTTS, Herbig Ae, WTTS, hybrid, and debris disks. Our sub-mm survey comprises 25 stars, including 17 new targets, and we increase the sensitivity limit by a factor 2 on eight sources compared to similar published studies. We report a 4sigma tentative detection of a double-peaked 12CO(2-1) line around HD23642; an eclipsing binary located in the Pleiades. We also reveal a correlation between the emission of the CO gas and the dust continuum from CTTS, Herbig Ae and few debris disks. The observed trend of the gas to dust flux ratio suggests a concurrent dissipation of the dust and gas components. Hybrid disks systematically lie above this trend, suggesting that these systems may witness a transient phase, when the dust has evolved more rapidly than the gas, with a flux ratio S_CO/F_cont enhanced by a factor of between 10 and 100 compared to standard (proto-)planetary disks.
  • Protoplanetary disks are the target of many chemical studies (both observational and theoretical) as they contain the building material for planets. Their large vertical and radial gradients in density and temperature make them challenging objects for chemical models. In the outer part of these disks, the large densities and low temperatures provide a particular environment where the binding of species onto the dust grains can be very efficient and can affect the gas-phase chemical composition. We attempt to quantify to what extent the vertical abundance profiles and the integrated column densities of molecules predicted by a detailed gas-grain code are affected by the treatment of the molecular hydrogen physisorption at the surface of the grains. We performed three different models using the Nautilus gas-grain code. One model uses a H2 binding energy on the surface of water (440 K) and produces strong sticking of H2. Another model uses a small binding energy of 23 K (as if there were already a monolayer of H2), and the sticking of H$_2$ is almost negligible. Finally, the remaining model is an intermediate solution known as the encounter desorption mechanism. We show that the efficiency of molecular hydrogen binding (and thus its abundance at the surface of the grains) can have a quantitative effect on the predicted column densities in the gas phase of major species such as CO, CS, CN, and HCN.
  • Transition disks correspond to a short stage between the young protoplanetary phase and older debris phase. Along this evolutionary sequence, the gas component disappears leaving room for a dust-dominated environment where already-formed planets signpost their gravitational perturbations. We endeavor to study the very inner region of the well-known and complex debris, but still gas-rich disk, around HD 141569A using the exquisite high-contrast capability of SPHERE at the VLT. Recent near-infrared (IR) images suggest a relatively depleted cavity within ~200 au, while former mid-IR data indicate the presence of dust at separations shorter than ~100 au. We obtained multi-wavelength images in the near-IR in J, H2, H3 and Ks bands with the IRDIS camera and a 0.95-1.35 micrometers spectral data cube with the IFS. Data were acquired in pupil-tracking mode, thus allowing for angular differential imaging. We discovered several new structures inside 1", of which the most prominent is a bright ring with sharp edges (semi-major axis: 0.4") featuring a strong north-south brightness asymmetry. Other faint structures are also detected from 0.4" to 1" in the form of concentric ringlets and at least one spiral arm. Finally, the VISIR data at 8.6 micrometers suggests the presence of an additional dust population closer in. Besides, we do not detect companions more massive than 1-3 mass of Jupiter. The performance of SPHERE allows us to resolve the extended dust component, which was previously detected at thermal and visible wavelengths, into very complex patterns with strong asymmetries ; the nature of these asymmetries remains to be understood. Scenarios involving shepherding by planets or dust-gas interactions will have to be tested against these observations.
  • Dust determines the temperature structure of protoplanetary disks. However, dust temperature determinations almost invariably rely on a complex modeling of the Spectral Energy Distribution. We attempt a direct determination of the temperature of large grains emitting at mm wavelengths.} We observe the edge-on dust disk of the Flying Saucer, which appears in silhouette against the CO J=2-1 emission from a background molecular cloud in $\rho$ Oph. The combination of velocity gradients due to the Keplerian rotation of the disk and intensity variations in the CO background as a function of velocity allows us to directly measure the %absorbing dust temperature. The dust opacity can then be derived from the emitted continuum radiation. The dust disk absorbs the radiation from the CO clouds at several velocities. We derive very low dust temperatures, 5 to 7 K at radii around 100 au, which is much lower than most model predictions. The dust optical depth is $> 0.2$ at 230 GHz, and the scale height at 100 au is at least 8 au (best fit 13 au). However, the dust disk is very flat (flaring index -0.35), which is indicative of dust settling in the outer parts.
  • Debris disks are usually thought to be gas-poor, the gas being dissipated by accretion or evaporation during the protoplanetary phase. HD141569A is a 5 Myr old star harboring a famous debris disk, with multiple rings and spiral features. We present here the first PdBI maps of the 12CO(2-1), 13CO(2-1) gas and dust emission at 1.3 mm in this disk. The analysis reveals there is still a large amount of (primordial) gas extending out to 250 au, i. e. inside the rings observed in scattered light. HD141569A is thus a hybrid disk with a huge debris component, where dust has evolved and is produced by collisions, with a large remnant reservoir of gas.
  • The gas mass of protoplanetary disks, and the gas-to-dust ratio, are two key elements driving the evolution of these disks and the formation of planetary system. We explore here to what extent CO (or its isotopologues) can be used as a tracer of gas mass. We use a detailed gas-grain chemical model and study the evolution of the disk composition, starting from a dense pre-stellar core composition. We explore a range of disk temperature profiles, cosmic rays ionization rates, and disk ages for a disk model representative of T Tauri stars. At the high densities that prevail in disks, we find that, due to fast reactions on grain surfaces, CO can be converted to less volatile forms (principally s-CO$_2$, and to a lesser extent s-CH$_4$) instead of being evaporated over a wide range of temperature. The canonical gas-phase abundance of 10$^{-4}$ is only reached above about 30-35 K. The dominant Carbon bearing entity depends on the temperature structure and age of the disk. The chemical evolution of CO is also sensitive to the cosmic rays ionization rate. Larger gas phase CO abundances are found in younger disks. Initial conditions, such as parent cloud age and density, have a limited impact. This study reveals that CO gas-phase abundance is heavily dependent on grain surface processes, which remain very incompletely understood so far. The strong dependence on dust temperature profile makes CO a poor tracer of the gas-phase content of disks.
  • We attempt to determine the molecular composition of disks around young low-mass stars in the $\rho$ Oph region and to compare our results with a similar study performed in the Taurus-Auriga region. We used the IRAM 30 m telescope to perform a sensitive search for CN N=2-1 in 29 T Tauri stars located in the $\rho$ Oph and upper Scorpius regions. $^{13}$CO J=2-1 is observed simultaneously to provide an indication of the level of confusion with the surrounding molecular cloud. The bandpass also contains two transitions of ortho-H$_2$CO, one of SO, and the C$^{17}$O J=2-1 line, which provides complementary information on the nature of the emission. Contamination by molecular cloud in $^{13}$CO and even C$^{17}$O is ubiquitous. The CN detection rate appears to be lower than for the Taurus region, with only four sources being detected (three are attributable to disks). H$_2$CO emission is found more frequently, but appears in general to be due to the surrounding cloud. The weaker emission than in Taurus may suggest that the average disk size in the $\rho$ Oph region is smaller than in the Taurus cloud. Chemical modeling shows that the somewhat higher expected disk temperatures in $\rho$ Oph play a direct role in decreasing the CN abundance. Warmer dust temperatures contribute to convert CN into less volatile forms. In such a young region, CN is no longer a simple, sensitive tracer of disks, and observations with other tracers and at high enough resolution with ALMA are required to probe the gas disk population.
  • Aims: We attempt to determine the masses of single or multiple young T Tauri and HAeBe stars from the rotation of their Keplerian disks. Methods:We used the IRAM PdBI interferometer to perform arcsecond resolution images of the CN N=2-1 transition with good spectral resolution. Integrated spectra from the 30-m radiotelescope show that CN is relatively unaffected by contamination from the molecular clouds. Our sample includes 12 sources, among which isolated stars like DM Tau and MWC 480 are used to demonstrate the method and its accuracy. We derive the dynamical mass by fitting a disk model to the emission, a process giving M/D the mass to distance ratio. We also compare the CN results with higher resolution CO data, that are however affected by contamination. Results: All disks are found in nearly perfect Keplerian rotation. We determine accurate masses for 11 stars, in the mass range 0.5 to 1.9 solar masses. The remaining one, DG Tau B, is a deeply embedded object for which CN emission partially arises from the outflow. With previous determination, this leads to 14 (single) stars with dynamical masses. Comparison with evolutionary tracks, in a distance independent modified HR diagram, show good overall agreement (with one exception, CW Tau), and indicate that measurement of effective temperatures are the limiting factor. The lack of low mass stars in the sample does not allow to distinguish between alternate tracks.
  • We aim at unveiling the observational imprint of physical mechanisms that govern planetary formation in young, multiple systems. In particular, we investigate the impact of tidal truncation on the inner circumstellar disks. We observed the emblematic system GG Tau at high-angular resolution: a hierarchical quadruple system composed of low-mass T Tauri binary stars surrounded by a well-studied, massive circumbinary disk in Keplerian rotation. We used the near-IR 4-telescope combiner PIONIER on the VLTI and sparse-aperture-masking techniques on VLT/NaCo to probe this proto-planetary system at sub-AU scales. We report the discovery of a significant closure-phase signal in H and Ks bands that can be reproduced with an additional low-mass companion orbiting GG Tau Ab, at a (projected) separation rho = 31.7 +/- 0.2mas (4.4 au) and PA = 219.6 +/- 0.3deg. This finding offers a simple explanation for several key questions in this system, including the missing-stellar-mass problem and the asymmetry of continuum emission from the inner dust disks observed at millimeter wavelengths. Composed of now five co-eval stars with 0.02 <= Mstar <= 0.7 Msun, the quintuple system GG Tau has become an ideal test case to constrain stellar evolution models at young ages (few 10^6yr).
  • (abridged) Most Class II sources (of nearby star forming regions) are surrounded by disks with weak millimeter continuum emission. These "faint" disks may hold clues to the disk dissipation mechanism. We attempt to determine the characteristics of such faint disks around classical T Tauri stars, and to explore the link between disk faintness and the proposed disk dispersal mechanisms (accretion, viscous spreading, photo-evaporation, planetary system formation). We performed high-angular resolution (0.3") imaging of a small sample of disks (9 sources) with low 1.3mm continuum flux (mostly <30 mJy) with the IRAM Plateau de Bure interferometer and simultaneously searched for 13CO (or CO) J=2-1 line emission. Using a simple parametric disk model, we determine characteristic sizes of the disks, in dust and gas, and we constrain surface densities in the central 50 AU. All disks are much smaller than the bright disks imaged so far, both in continuum and 13CO lines (5 detections). In continuum, half of the disks are very small, with characteristic radii less than 10AU, but still have high surface density values. Small sizes appear to be the main cause for the low disk luminosity. Direct evidence for grain growth is found for the three disks that are sufficiently resolved. Low continuum opacity is attested in two systems only, but we cannot firmly distinguish between a low gas surface density and a lower dust emissivity resulting from grain growth. We report a tentative discovery of a 20 AU radius cavity in DS Tau, bringing the proportion of transitional disks to a similar value to that of brighter sources, but cavities cannot explain the low mm flux. This study highlights a category of very compact dust disks, still exhibiting high surface densities, which may represent up to 25 % of the whole disk population, but its origin is unclear with the current data alone.
  • Investigating the dynamical evolution of dust grains in proto-planetary disks is a key issue to understand how planets should form. We identify under which conditions dust settling can be constrained by high angular resolution observations at mm wavelengths, and which observational strategies are suited for such studies. Exploring a large range of models, we generate synthetic images of disks with different degrees of dust settling, and simulate high angular resolution (~ 0.05-0.3") ALMA observations of these synthetic disks. The resulting data sets are then analyzed blindly with homogeneous disk models (where dust and gas are totally mixed) and the derived disk parameters are used as tracers of the settling factor. Our dust disks are partially resolved by ALMA and present some specific behaviors on radial and mainly vertical directions, which can be used to quantify the level of settling. We find out that an angular resolution better than or equal to ~ 0.1" (using 2.3 km baselines at 0.8mm) allows us to constrain the dust scale height and flaring index with sufficient precision to unambiguously distinguish between settled and non-settled disks, provided the inclination is close enough to edge-on (i >= 75{\deg}). Ignoring dust settling and assuming hydrostatic equilibrium when analyzing such disks affects the derived dust temperature and the radial dependency of the dust emissivity index. The surface density distribution can also be severely biased at the highest inclinations. However, the derived dust properties remain largely unaffected if the disk scale height is fitted separately. ALMA has the potential to test some of the dust settling mechanisms, but for real disks, deviations from ideal geometry (warps, spiral waves) may provide an ultimate limit on the dust settling detection.
  • Molecular line emission from protoplanetary disks is a powerful tool to constrain their physical and chemical structure. Nevertheless, only a few molecules have been detected in disks so far. We take advantage of the enhanced capabilities of the IRAM 30m telescope by using the new broad band correlator (FTS) to search for so far undetected molecules in the protoplanetary disks surrounding the TTauri stars DM Tau, GO Tau, LkCa 15 and the Herbig Ae star MWC 480. We report the first detection of HC3N at 5 sigma in the GO Tau and MWC 480 disks with the IRAM 30-m, and in the LkCa 15 disk (5 sigma), using the IRAM array, with derived column densities of the order of 10^{12}cm^{-2}. We also obtain stringent upper limits on CCS (N < 1.5 x 10^{12} cm^{-3}). We discuss the observational results by comparing them to column densities derived from existing chemical disk models (computed using the chemical code Nautilus) and based on previous nitrogen and sulfur-bearing molecule observations. The observed column densities of HC3N are typically two orders of magnitude lower than the existing predictions and appear to be lower in the presence of strong UV flux, suggesting that the molecular chemistry is sensitive to the UV penetration through the disk. The CCS upper limits reinforce our model with low elemental abundance of sulfur derived from other sulfur-bearing molecules (CS, H2S and SO).
  • Circumstellar disks are characteristic for star formation and vanish during the first few Myr of stellar evolution. During this time planets are believed to form in the dense midplane by growth, sedimentation and aggregation of dust. Indicators of disk evolution, such as holes and gaps, can be traced in the spectral energy distribution (SED) and spatially resolved images. We aim to construct a self-consistent model of HH 30 by fitting all available continuum observations simultaneously. New data sets not available in previous studies, such as high-resolution interferometric imaging with the Plateau de Bure Interferometer (PdBI) at lambda = 1.3 mm and SED measured with IRS on the Spitzer Space Telescope in the mid-infrared, put strong constraints on predictions and are likely to provide new insights into the evolutionary state of this object. A parameter study based on simulated annealing was performed to find unbiased best-fit models for independent observations made in the wavelength domain lambda ~ 1 micron ... 4 mm. The method essentially creates a Markov chain through parameter space by comparing predictions generated by our self-consistent continuum radiation transfer code MC3D with observations. We present models of the edge-on circumstellar disk of HH 30 based on observations from the near-infrared to mm-wavelengths that suggest the presence of an inner depletion zone with about 45 AU radius and a steep decline of mm opacity beyond 140 AU. Our modeling indicates that several modes of dust evolution such as growth, settling, and radial migration are taking place in this object. High-resolution observations of HH 30 at different wavelengths with next-generation observatories such as ALMA and JWST will enable the modeling of inhomogeneous dust properties and significantly expand our understanding of circumstellar disk evolution.
  • The chemistry of proto-planetary disks is thought to be dominated by two major processes: photodissociation near the disk surface, and depletion on dust grains in the disk mid-plane, resulting in a layered structure with molecules located in a warm layer above the disk mid-plane. We attempt here to confront this warm molecular layer model prediction with the distribution of two key molecules for dissociation processes: CN and HCN. Using the IRAM Plateau de Bure interferometer, we obtained high spatial and spectral resolution images of the CN J=2-1 and HCN J=1-0 lines in the disks surrounding the two T-Tauri DM Tau and LkCa 15 and the Herbig Ae MWC 480. Disk properties are derived assuming power law distributions. The hyperfine structure of the observed transitions allows us to constrain the line opacities and excitation temperatures. We compare the observational results with predictions from existing chemical models, and use a simple PDR model (without freeze-out of molecules on grains and surface chemistry) to illustrate dependencies on UV field strength, grain size and gas-to-dust ratio. We also evaluate the impact of Lyman alpha radiation. The temperature ordering follows the trend found from CO lines, with DM Tau being the coldest object and MWC 480 the warmest. Although CN indicates somewhat higher excitation temperatures than HCN, the derived values in the T-Tauri disks are very low (8-10 K). They agree with results obtained from CCH, and are in contradiction with thermal and chemical model predictions. These very low temperatures, as well as geometrical constraints, suggest that substantial amounts of CN and HCN remain in the gas phase close to the disk mid-plane, and that this mid-plane is quite cold. The observed CN/HCN ratio (5-10) is in better agreement with the existence of large grains, and possibly also a substantial contribution of Lyman alpha radiation.
  • Gas and dust dissipation processes of proto-planetary disks are hardly known. Transition disks between Class II (proto-planetary disks) and Class III (debris disks) remain difficult to detect. We investigate the carbon chemistry of the peculiar CQ Tau gas disk. It is likely a transition disk because it exhibits weak CO emission with a relatively strong millimeter continuum, indicating that the disk might be currently dissipating its gas content. We used APEX to observe the two CI lines at 492GHz and 809 GHz in the disk orbiting CQ Tau. We compare the observations to several chemical model predictions. We focus our study on the influence of the stellar UV radiation shape and gas-to-dust ratio. We did not detect the CI lines. However, our upper limits are deep enough to exclude high-CI models. The only available models compatible with our limits imply very low gas-to-dust ratio, of the order of a few, only. These observations strengthen the hypothesis that CQ Tau is likely a transition disk and suggest that gas disappears before dust.
  • Recent sub-millimetric observations at the Plateau de Bure interferometer evidenced a cavity at ~ 46 AU in radius into the proto-planetary disk around the T Tauri star LkCa15 (V1079 Tau), located in the Taurus molecular cloud. Additional Spitzer observations have corroborated this result possibly explained by the presence of a massive (>= 5 MJup) planetary mass, a brown dwarf or a low mass star companion at about 30 AU from the star. We used the most recent developments of high angular resolution and high contrast imaging to search directly for the existence of this putative companion, and to bring new constraints on its physical and orbital properties. The NACO adaptive optics instrument at VLT was used to observe LkCa15 using a four quadrant phase mask coronagraph to access small angular separations at relatively high contrast. A reference star at the same parallactic angle was carefully observed to optimize the quasi-static speckles subtraction (limiting our sensitivity at less than 1.0). Although we do not report any positive detection of a faint companion that would be responsible for the observed gap in LkCa15's disk (25-30 AU), our detection limits start constraining its probable mass, semi-major axis and eccentricity. Using evolutionary model predictions, Monte Carlo simulations exclude the presence of low eccentric companions with masses M >= 6 M Jup and orbiting at a >= 100 AU with significant level of confidence. For closer orbits, brown dwarf companions can be rejected with a detection probability of 90% down to 80 AU (at 80% down to 60 AU). Our detection limits do not access the star environment close enough to fully exclude the presence of a brown dwarf or a massive planet within the disk inner activity (i.e at less than 30 AU). Only, further and higher contrast observations should unveil the existence of this putative companion inside the LkCa15 disk.
  • Aims. We attempt to understand the presence of gas phase CO below its freezing temperature in circumstellar disks. We study two promising mechanisms to explain this phenomenon: turbulent mixing and photodesorption. Methods. We compute the chemical evolution of circumstellar disks including grain surface reactions with and without turbulent mixing and CO photodesorption. Results. We show that photodesorption significantly enhances the gas phase CO abundance, by extracting CO from the grains when the visual extinction remains below about 5 magnitudes. However the resulting dependence of column density on radial distance is not consistent with observations so far. We propose that this inconsistency could be the result of grain growth. On the other hand, the influence of turbulent mixing is not found to be straightforward. The efficiency of turbulent mixing depends upon a variety of parameters, including the disk structure. For the set of parameters we chose, turbulent mixing is not found to have any significant influence on the CO column density.
  • The disk-outflow connection is thought to play a key role in extracting excess angular momentum from a forming proto-star. Though jet rotation has been observed in a few objects, no rotation of molecular outflows has been unambiguously reported so far. We report new millimeter-interferometric observations of the edge-on T Tauri star - disk system in the isolated Bok globule CB26. The aim of these observations was to study the disk-outflow relation in this 1Myr old low-mass young stellar object. The IRAM PdBI array was used to observe 12CO(2-1) at 1.3mm in two configurations, resulting in spectral line maps with 1.5 arcsec resolution. We use an empirical parameterized steady-state outflow model combined with 2-D line radiative transfer calculations and chi^2-minimization in parameter space to derive a best-fit model and constrain parameters of the outflow. The data reveal a previously undiscovered collimated bipolar molecular outflow of total length ~2000 AU, escaping perpendicular to the plane of the disk. We find peculiar kinematic signatures that suggest the outflow is rotating with the same orientation as the disk. However, we could not ultimately exclude jet precession or two misaligned flows as possible origin of the observed peculiar velocity field. There is indirect indication that the embedded driving source is a binary system, which, together with the youth of the source, could provide the clue to the observed kinematic features of the outflow. CB26 is so far the most promising source to study the rotation of a molecular outflow. Assuming that the outflow is rotating, we compute and compare masses, mass flux, angular momenta, and angular momentum flux of disk and outflow and derive disk dispersal timescales of 0.5...1 Myr, comparable to the age of the system.
  • We report new millimeter observations of the circumstellar material surrounding the Herbig Ae A0.5 star HD 34282 performed with the IRAM array in CO J=2-1 and in continuum at 1.3 mm. These observations have revealed the existence of a large Keplerian disk around the star. We have analysed simultaneously the line and continuum emissions to derive the physical properties of both the gas and the dust. The analysis of our observations also shows that the Hipparcos distance to the star is somewhat underestimated ; the actual distance is probably about 400 pc. With this distance the disk around HD 34282 appears more massive and somewhat hotter than the observed disks around less massive T Tauri stars, but shares the general behaviour of passive disks.
  • New, high-sensitivity interferometric CO J=2-1 observations of the HH 7-11 outflow show that despite previous doubts, this system is powered by the Class I source SVS 13. The molecular outflow from SVS 13 is formed by a shell with a large opening angle at the base, which is typical of outflows from Class I sources, but it also contains an extremely-high-velocity jet composed of ``molecular bullets'', which is more typical of Class 0 outflows. This suggests that SVS 13 could be a very young Class I, which still keeps some features of the previous evolutionary stage. We briefly discuss the nature of some sources in the SVS 13 vicinity which are emitters of cm-wave continuum, but have no counterpart at mm wavelengths.