• Microlensing events provide a unique capacity to study the stellar remnant population of the Galaxy. Optical microlensing suffers from a near complete degeneracy between the mass, the velocity and the distance. However, a subpopulation of lensed stars, Mira variable stars, are also radio bright, exhibiting strong SiO masers. These are sufficiently bright and compact to permit direct imaging using existing very long baseline interferometers such as the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA). We show that these events are relatively common, occurring at a rate of $\approx 2~{\rm yr^{\ -1}}$ of which $0.1~{\rm yr^{-1}}$ are associated with Galactic black holes. Features in the associated images, e.g., the Einstein ring, are sufficiently well resolved to fully reconstruct the lens properties, enabling the measurement of mass, distance, and tangential velocity of the lensing object to a precision better than 15%. Future radio microlensing surveys conducted with upcoming radio telescopes combined with modest improvements in the VLBA could increase the rate of Galactic black hole events to roughly 10~${\rm yr}^{-1}$, sufficient to double the number of known stellar mass black holes in a couple years, and permitting the construction of distribution functions of stellar mass black hole properties.
  • Chandra X-ray observations of the nearby brightest cluster galaxy M87 resolve the hot gas structure across the Bondi accretion radius of the central supermassive black hole, a measurement possible in only a handful of systems but complicated by the bright nucleus and jet emission. By stacking only short frame-time observations to limit pileup, and after subtracting the nuclear PSF, we analysed the X-ray gas properties within the Bondi radius at 0.12-0.22 kpc (1.5-2.8 arcsec), depending on the black hole mass. Within 2 kpc radius, we detect two significant temperature components, which are consistent with constant values of 2 keV and 0.9 keV down to 0.15 kpc radius. No evidence was found for the expected temperature increase within ~0.25 kpc due to the influence of the SMBH. Within the Bondi radius, the density profile is consistent with $\rho\propto r^{-1}$. The lack of a temperature increase inside the Bondi radius suggests that the hot gas structure is not dictated by the SMBH's potential and, together with the shallow density profile, shows that the classical Bondi rate may not reflect the accretion rate onto the SMBH. If this density profile extends in towards the SMBH, the mass accretion rate onto the SMBH could be at least two orders of magnitude less than the Bondi rate, which agrees with Faraday rotation measurements for M87. We discuss the evidence for outflow from the hot gas and the cold gas disk and for cold feedback, where gas cooling rapidly from the hot atmosphere could feed the cirumnuclear disk and fuel the SMBH. At 0.2 kpc radius, the cooler X-ray temperature component represents ~20% of the total X-ray gas mass and, by losing angular momentum to the hot gas component, could provide a fuel source of cold clouds within the Bondi radius.