• We present the "SINS/zC-SINF AO survey" of 35 star-forming galaxies, the largest sample with deep adaptive optics-assisted (AO) near-infrared integral field spectroscopy at z~2. The observations, taken with SINFONI at the Very Large Telescope, resolve the Ha and [NII] line emission and kinematics on scales of ~1.5 kpc. In stellar mass, star formation rate, rest-optical colors and size, the AO sample is representative of its parent seeing-limited sample and probes the massive (M* ~ 2x10^9 - 3x10^11 Msun), actively star-forming (SFR ~ 10-600 Msun/yr) part of the z~2 galaxy population over a wide range in colors ((U-V)_rest ~ 0.15-1.5 mag) and half-light radii (R_e,H ~ 1-8.5 kpc). The sample overlaps largely with the "main sequence" of star-forming galaxies in the same redshift range to a similar K_AB = 23 magnitude limit; it has ~0.3 dex higher median specific SFR, ~0.1 mag bluer median (U-V)_rest color, and ~10% larger median rest-optical size. We describe the observations, data reduction, and extraction of basic flux and kinematic properties. With typically 3-4 times higher resolution and 4-5 times longer integrations (up to 23hr) than the seeing-limited datasets of the same objects, the AO data reveal much more detail in morphology and kinematics. The now complete AO observations confirm the majority of kinematically-classified disks and the typically elevated disk velocity dispersions previously reported based on subsets of the data. We derive typically flat or slightly negative radial [NII]/Ha gradients, with no significant trend with global galaxy properties, kinematic nature, or the presence of an AGN. Azimuthal variations in [NII]/Ha are seen in several sources and are associated with ionized gas outflows, and possible more metal-poor star-forming clumps or small companions. [Abridged]
  • We present the analysis of HST $J$- and $H$-band imaging for 29 galaxies on the star-forming main sequence at $z\sim2$, which have Adaptive Optics VLT SINFONI integral field spectroscopy from our SINS/zC-SINF program. The SINFONI H$\alpha$ data resolve the on-going star-formation and the ionized gas kinematics on scales of $1-2$ kpc; the near-IR images trace the galaxies' rest-frame optical morphologies and distributions of stellar mass in old stellar populations at a similar resolution. The global light profiles of most galaxies show disk-like properties well described by a single S\'ersic profile with $n\sim1$, with only $\sim15%$ requiring a high $n>3$ S\'ersic index, all more massive than $10^{10}M_\odot$. In bulge+disk fits, about $40%$ of galaxies have a measurable bulge component in the light profiles, with $\sim15%$ showing a substantial bulge-to-total ratio $B/T\ge0.3$. This is a lower limit to the frequency of $z\sim2$ massive galaxies with a developed bulge component in stellar mass because it could be hidden by dust and/or outshined by a thick actively star-forming disk component. The galaxies' rest-optical half-light radii range between $1-7$ kpc, with a median of 2.1 kpc, and lie slightly above the size-mass relation at these epochs reported in the literature. This is attributed to differences in sample selection and definitions of size and/or mass measurements. The $(u-g)_{rest}$ color gradient and scatter within individual $z\sim2$ massive galaxies with $\ge10^{11}M_\odot$ are as high as in $z=0$ low-mass, late-type galaxies, and are consistent with the high star-formation rates of massive $z\sim2$ galaxies being sustained at large galactocentric distances.
  • We present initial results of a deep near-IR spectroscopic survey covering the 15 fields of the Keck Baryonic Structure Survey (KBSS) using MOSFIRE on the Keck 1 telescope, focusing on a sample of 251 galaxies with redshifts 2.0< z < 2.6, star-formation rates 2 < SFR < 200 M_sun/yr, and stellar masses 8.6 < log(M*/M_sun) < 11.4, with high-quality spectra in both H- and K-band atmospheric windows. We show unambiguously that the locus of z~2.3 galaxies in the "BPT" nebular diagnostic diagram exhibits a disjoint, yet similarly tight, relationship between the ratios [NII]6585/Halpha and [OIII]/Hbeta as compared to local galaxies. Using photoionization models, we argue that the offset of the z~2.3 locus relative to z~ 0 is explained by a combination of harder ionizing radiation field, higher ionization parameter, and higher N/O at a given O/H than applies to most local galaxies, and that the position of a galaxy along the z~2.3 star-forming BPT locus is surprisingly insensitive to gas-phase oxygen abundance. The observed nebular emission line ratios are most easily reproduced by models in which the net ionizing radiation field resembles a blackbody with effective temperature T_eff = 50000-60000 K and N/O close to the solar value at all O/H. We critically assess the applicability of commonly-used strong line indices for estimating gas-phase metallicities, and consider the implications of the small intrinsic scatter in the empirical relationship between excitation-sensitive line indices and stellar mass (i.e., the "mass-metallicity" relation), at z~2.3.
  • We report the detection of ubiquitous powerful nuclear outflows in massive (> 10^11 Msun) z~2 star-forming galaxies (SFGs), which are plausibly driven by an Active Galactic Nucleus (AGN). The sample consists of the eight most massive SFGs from our SINS/zC-SINF survey of galaxy kinematics with the imaging spectrometer SINFONI, six of which have sensitive high-resolution adaptive optics (AO) assisted observations. All of the objects are disks hosting a significant stellar bulge. The spectra in their central regions exhibit a broad component in Halpha and forbidden [NII] and [SII] line emission, with typical velocity FWHM ~ 1500 km/s, [NII]/Halpha ratio ~ 0.6, and intrinsic extent of 2 - 3 kpc. These properties are consistent with warm ionized gas outflows associated with Type 2 AGN, the presence of which is confirmed via independent diagnostics in half the galaxies. The data imply a median ionized gas mass outflow rate of ~ 60 Msun/yr and mass loading of ~ 3. At larger radii, a weaker broad component is detected but with lower FWHM ~ 485 km/s and [NII]/Halpha ~ 0.35, characteristic for star formation-driven outflows as found in the lower-mass SINS/zC-SINF galaxies. The high inferred mass outflow rates and frequent occurrence suggest the nuclear outflows efficiently expel gas out of the centers of the galaxies with high duty cycles, and may thus contribute to the process of star formation quenching in massive galaxies. Larger samples at high masses will be crucial to confirm the importance and energetics of the nuclear outflow phenomenon, and its connection to AGN activity and bulge growth.
  • We present a study of the prevalence, strength, and kinematics of ultraviolet FeII and MgII emission lines in 212 star-forming galaxies at z = 1 selected from the DEEP2 survey. We find FeII* emission in composite spectra assembled on the basis of different galaxy properties, indicating that FeII* emission is prevalent at z = 1. In these composites, FeII* emission is observed at roughly the systemic velocity. At z = 1, we find that the strength of FeII* emission is most strongly modulated by dust attenuation, and is additionally correlated with redshift, star-formation rate, and [OII] equivalent width, such that systems at higher redshifts with lower dust levels, lower star-formation rates, and larger [OII] equivalent widths show stronger FeII* emission. We detect MgII emission in at least 15% of the individual spectra and we find that objects showing stronger MgII emission have higher specific star-formation rates, smaller [OII] linewidths, larger [OII] equivalent widths, lower dust attenuations, and lower stellar masses than the sample as a whole. MgII emission strength exhibits the strongest correlation with specific star-formation rate, although we find evidence that dust attenuation and stellar mass also play roles in the regulation of MgII emission. Future integral field unit observations of the spatial extent of FeII* and MgII emission in galaxies with high specific star-formation rates, low dust attenuations, and low stellar masses will be important for probing the morphology of circumgalactic gas.
  • We investigate galactic-scale outflowing winds in 72 star-forming galaxies at z~1 in the Extended Groth Strip. Galaxies were selected from the DEEP2 survey and follow-up LRIS spectroscopy was obtained covering SiII, CIV, FeII, MgII, and MgI lines in the rest-frame ultraviolet. Using GALEX, HST, and Spitzer imaging, we examine galaxies on a per-object basis in order to understand both the prevalence of galactic winds at z~1 and the star-forming and structural properties of objects experiencing outflows. Gas velocities, measured from the centroids of FeII interstellar absorption lines, span the interval [-217, +155] km/s. We find that ~40% (10%) of the sample exhibits blueshifted FeII lines at the 1-sigma (3-sigma) level. We also measure maximal outflow velocities using the profiles of the FeII and MgII lines, and show that MgII frequently traces higher velocity gas than FeII. Quantitative morphological parameters derived from the HST imaging suggest that mergers are not a prerequisite for driving outflows. More face-on galaxies also show stronger winds than highly-inclined systems, consistent with the canonical picture of winds emanating perpendicular to galactic disks. Using star-formation rates calculated from GALEX data, and areas estimated from HST imaging, we detect a ~3-sigma correlation between outflow velocity and star-formation rate surface density, but only a weak (~1-sigma) trend between outflow velocity and star-formation rate. Higher resolution data are needed in order to test the scaling relations between outflow velocity and both star-formation rate and star-formation rate surface density predicted by theory.
  • We study the properties of luminous stellar clumps identified in deep, high resolution HST/NIC2 F160W imaging at 1.6um of six z~2 star-forming galaxies with existing near-IR integral field spectroscopy from SINFONI at the VLT. Individual clumps contribute ~0.5%-15% of the galaxy-integrated rest-frame ~5000A emission, with median of about 2%; the total contribution of clump light ranges from 10%-25%. The median intrinsic clump size and stellar mass are ~1kpc and log(Mstar[Msun])~9, in the ranges for clumps identified in rest-UV or line emission in other studies. The clump sizes and masses in the subset of disks are broadly consistent with expectations for clump formation via gravitational instabilities in gas-rich, turbulent disks given the host galaxies' global properties. By combining the NIC2 data with ACS/F814W imaging available for one source, and AO-assisted SINFONI Halpha data for another, we infer modest color, M/L, and stellar age variations within each galaxy. In these two objects, sets of clumps identified at different wavelengths do not fully overlap; NIC2-identified clumps tend to be redder/older than ACS- or Halpha-identified clumps without rest-frame optical counterparts. There is evidence for a systematic trend of older ages at smaller galactocentric radii among the clumps, consistent with scenarios where inward migration of clumps transports material towards the central regions. From constraints on a bulge-like component at radii <1-3kpc, none of the five disks in our sample appears to contain a compact massive stellar core, and we do not discern a trend of bulge stellar mass fraction with stellar age of the galaxy. Further observations are necessary to probe the build-up of stellar bulges and the role of clumps in this process.
  • Using a sample of 92 UV continuum-selected, spectroscopically identified galaxies with <z> = 2.65, all of which have been imaged in the Ly-a line with extremely deep narrow-band imaging, we examine galaxy Ly-a emission profiles to very faint surface brightness limits. The galaxies are representative of spectroscopic samples of LBGs at similar redshifts in terms of apparent magnitude, UV luminosity, inferred extinction, and star formation rate, and were selected without regard to Ly-a emission properties. We use extremely deep stacks of UV continuum and Ly-a emission line images to show that all sub-samples exhibit diffuse Ly-a emission to radii of at least 10" (80 physical kpc), including galaxies whose spectra exhibit Ly-a in net absorption. The intensity scaling, but not the surface brightness distribution, is strongly correlated with the emission observed in the central ~1". The characteristic scale length for Ly-a line emission exceeds that of the UV continuum light for the same galaxies by factors of at least 5-10, regardless of the spectral morphology of Ly-a. Including the extended Ly-a halos increases the total Ly-a flux [and rest equivalent width W_0(Lya)] by an average factor of 5. We argue that most, if not all, of the observed Ly-a emission in the diffuse halos originates in the galaxy H II regions and is scattered in our direction by H I gas in the galaxy's circum-galactic medium (CGM). We show that whether or not a galaxy is classified as a giant "Lyman-a Blob" (LAB) depends sensitively on the Ly-a surface brightness threshold reached by an observation. Accounting for diffuse Ly-a halos, all LBGs would be LABs if surveys were routinely sensitive to 10 times lower surface brightness thresholds; also, essentially all LBGs would qualify as LAEs (W_0(Lya) > 20 A).
  • We present the results of an ultradeep, narrowband imaging survey for Lyman-continuum (LyC) emission at z~3 in the SSA22a field. We employ a custom narrowband filter centered at 3640A (NB3640), which probes the LyC region for galaxies at z>3.06. We also analyze new and archival NB4980 imaging tuned to the wavelength of the Lya emission line at z=3.09, and archival broadband B, V, and R images of the non-ionizing UV continuum. Our NB3640 images contain 26 z>3.06 Lyman Break Galaxies (LBGs) as well as a set of 130 Lya emitters (LAEs), identified by their excess NB4980 flux relative to the BV continuum. Six LBGs and 28 LAEs are detected in the NB3640 image. LBGs appear to span a range of NB3640-R colors, while LAEs appear bimodal in their NB3640-R properties. We estimate average UV to LyC flux density ratios, corrected for foreground contamination and intergalactic medium absorption, finding <F_{UV}/F_{LyC}>^{LBG} = 11.3^{+10.3}_{-5.4}, which implies a LBG LyC escape fraction f_{esc}^{LyC} ~ 0.1, and <F_{UV}/F_{LyC}>^{LAE} = 2.2^{+0.9}_{-0.6}. The strikingly blue LAE flux density ratios defy interpretation in terms of standard stellar population models. Assuming <F_{UV}/F_{LyC}>^{LBG} applies down to L=0.1L*, we estimate a galaxy contribution to the intergalactic hydrogen ionization rate that is consistent with independent estimates based on the Lya forest opacity at z~3. If we assume that <F_{UV}/F_{LyC}>^{LAE} holds at the faintest luminosities, the galaxy contribution significantly exceeds that inferred from the Lya forest. Further follow-up study of these faint LAEs is crucial, given the potentially important contribution similar objects make to the process of reionization. (Abridged)
  • We present deep and high-resolution HST/NIC2 F160W imaging at 1.6micron of six z~2 star-forming galaxies with existing near-IR integral field spectroscopy from SINFONI at the VLT. The unique combination of rest-frame optical imaging and nebular emission-line maps provides simultaneous insight into morphologies and dynamical properties. The overall rest-frame optical emission of the galaxies is characterized by shallow profiles in general (Sersic index n<1), with median effective radii of ~5kpc. The morphologies are significantly clumpy and irregular, which we quantify through a non-parametric morphological approach, estimating the Gini (G), Multiplicity (Psi), and M_20 coefficients. The strength of the rest-frame optical emission lines in the F160W bandpass indicates that the observed structure is not dominated by the morphology of line-emitting gas, and must reflect the underlying stellar mass distribution of the galaxies. The sizes and structural parameters in the rest-frame optical continuum and Halpha emission reveal no significant differences, suggesting similar global distributions of the on-going star formation and more evolved stellar population. While no strong correlations are observed between stellar population parameters and morphology within the NIC2/SINFONI sample itself, a consideration of the sample in the context of a broader range of z~2 galaxy types indicates that these galaxies probe the high specific star formation rate and low stellar mass surface density part of the massive z~2 galaxy population, with correspondingly large effective radii, low Sersic indices, low G, and high Psi and M_20. The combined NIC2 and SINFONI dataset yields insights of unprecedented detail into the nature of mass accretion at high redshift. [Abridged]
  • We present new results on the kinematics and spatial distribution of metal-enriched gas within 125 kpc (physical) of Lyman Break galaxies at redshifts z~2-3. In particular, we demonstrate how rest-UV galaxy spectra can be used to obtain key spatial and spectral information more efficiently than possible with QSO sightlines. After recalibrating the measurement of galaxy systemic redshifts from their UV spectra, we investigate the kinematics of galaxy-scale outflows via the strong interstellar (IS) absorption and Lya emission lines (when present), as well as their dependence on other physical properties of the galaxies. We construct a sample of 512 close (1-15 arcsec) angular pairs of z~2-3 LBGs in which the spectra background galaxies probe the circumgalactic gas surrrounding those in the foreground. The close pairs, together with spectra of the foreground galaxies themselves, sample galactocentric impact parameters b=0-125 kpc (physical) at <z>=2.2. The ensemble provides a spatial map of cool gas as a function of galactocentric distance for a well-characterized population of galaxies. We propose a simple model that simultaneously matches the kinematics, depth, and profile shape of IS absorption and Lya emission lines, as well as the observed variation of absorption line strength (of HI, CII, CIV, SiII, SiIV) versus galactocentric impact parameter. We discuss the results of the observations in the context of "cold accretion", in which cool gas accretes via filamentary streams directly onto the central regions of galaxies. At present, we find little observational support for cool infalling material, whereas evidence supporting the large-scale effects of outflows is strong. Reconciling theory and observation on the subject of gas flows into and out of forming galaxies seems necessary.
  • We present the SINS survey with SINFONI of high redshift galaxies. With 80 objects observed and 63 detected, SINS is the largest survey of spatially resolved gas kinematics, morphologies, and physical properties of star-forming galaxies at z~1-3. We describe the selection of the targets, the observations, and the data reduction. We then focus on the "SINS Halpha sample" of 62 rest-UV/optically-selected sources at 1.3<z<2.6 for which we targeted primarily the Halpha and [NII] emission lines. Only 30% of this sample had previous near-IR spectroscopic observations. As a whole, the SINS Halpha sample covers a reasonable representation of massive log(M*/Msun)>~10 star-forming galaxies at z~1.5-2.5, with some bias towards bluer systems compared to pure K-selected samples due to the requirement of secure optical redshift. The sample spans two orders of magnitude in stellar mass and in absolute and specific star formation rates, with median values of approximately log(M*/Msun) = 10.5, 70 Msun/yr, and 3/Gyr. The ionized gas distribution and kinematics are spatially resolved on scales ranging from 1.5 kpc for adaptive optics assisted observations to typically 4-5 kpc for seeing-limited data. The Halpha morphologies tend to be irregular and/or clumpy. About one-third are rotation-dominated yet turbulent disks, another third comprises compact and velocity dispersion-dominated objects, and the remaining galaxies are clear interacting/merging systems; the fraction of rotation-dominated systems increases among the more massive part of the sample. The Halpha luminosities and equivalent widths suggest on average roughly twice higher dust attenuation towards the HII regions relative to the bulk of the stars, and comparable current and past-averaged star formation rates. [Abridged]
  • We present 0.5" resolution near-IR integral field spectroscopy of the Ha line emission of 14 z~2 UV-selected BM/BX galaxies obtained with SINFONI at ESO/VLT. The mean Ha half-light radius r_1/2 is about 4kpc and line emission is detected over > ~20kpc in several sources. In 9 sources, we detect spatially-resolved velocity gradients, from 40 to 410 km/s over ~10kpc. The observed kinematics of the larger systems are consistent with orbital motions. Four galaxies are well described by rotating disks with clumpy morphologies and we extract rotation curves out to radii > ~10kpc. One or two galaxies exhibit signatures more consistent with mergers. Analyzing all 14 galaxies in the framework of rotating disks, we infer mean inclination- and beam-corrected maximum circular velocities v_c of 180+-90 km/s and dynamical masses of (0.5-25)x10^10 Msun within r_1/2. On average, the dynamical masses are consistent with photometric stellar masses assuming a Chabrier/Kroupa IMF but too small for a 0.1-100 Msun Salpeter IMF. The specific angular momenta of our BM/BX galaxies are similar to those of local late-type galaxies. The specific angular momenta of their baryons are comparable to those of their dark matter halos. Extrapolating from the average v_c at 10kpc, the virial mass of the typical halo of a galaxy in our sample is 10^(11.7+-0.5) Msun. Kinematic modeling of the 3 best cases implies a ratio of v_c to local velocity dispersion of order 2-4 and accordingly a large geometric thickness. We argue that this suggests a mass accretion (alternatively, gas exhaustion) timescale of ~500Myr. We also argue that if our BM/BX galaxies were initially gas rich, their clumpy disks will subsequently lose their angular momentum and form compact bulges on a timescale of ~1 Gyr. [ABRIDGED]
  • We present results of near-IR spectroscopic measurements of 7 star-forming galaxies at 2.1<z<2.5. Drawn from a large spectroscopic survey of galaxies photometrically pre-selected by their U_nGR colors to lie at z~2, these galaxies were chosen for their bright rest-frame optical luminosities (K_s<=20.0). Most strikingly, the majority of the sample of 7 galaxies exhibit [NII]/Ha nebular emission line ratios indicative of at least solar HII region metallicities, at a lookback time of 10.5 Gyr. The broadband colors of the K_s-bright sample indicate that most have been forming stars for more than a Gyr at z~2, and have already formed stellar masses in excess of 10^11 Msun. The descendants of these galaxies in the local universe are most likely metal-rich and massive spiral and elliptical galaxies, while plausible progenitors for them can be found among the population of z~3 Lyman Break Galaxies. While the K_s-bright z~2 galaxies appear to be highly evolved systems, their large Ha luminosities and uncorrected Ha star-formation rates of 24-60 Msun/yr indicate that active star formation is still ongoing. The luminous UV-selected objects presented here comprise more than half of the high-redshift (z>1.5) tails of current K-band-selected samples such as the K20 and Gemini Deep Deep surveys.
  • We present complementary data on 5 intermediate redshift (0.44 < z < 0.66) MgII absorbing galaxies, combining high spatial resolution imaging from HST, high--resolution QSO spectroscopy from Keck/HIRES, and galaxy kinematics from intermediate resolution spectroscopy using Keck/LRIS. These data allow a direct comparison of the kinematics of gas at large galactocentric impact parameters with the galaxy kinematics obtained from the faint galaxy spectroscopy. All 5 galaxies appear to be relatively normal spirals, with measured rotation curves yielding circular velocities in the range 100 < v_c < 260 km/s. We find that in 4 of the 5 cases examined, the velocities of all of the Mg II absorption components lie entirely to one side of the galaxy systemic redshift. These observations are consistent with rotation being dominant for the absorbing gas kinematics; however, the total range of velocities observed is inconsistent with simple disk rotation in every case. Simple kinematic models that simultaneously explain both the systemic offset of the absorbing material relative to the galaxy redshifts, and the total velocity width spanned by the absorption, require either extremely thick rotating gas layers, rotation velocities that vary with height above the extrapolation of the galactic plane, or both. In any case, our small sample suggests that rotating ``halo'' gas is a common feature of intermediate redshift spiral galaxies, and that the kinematic signature of rotation dominates over radial infall or outflow even for gas well away from the galactic plane. We discuss possible explanations for this behavior, and compare our observations to possible local analogs.
  • We have used the Submillimetre Common-User Bolometer Array (SCUBA) detector on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT) to measure bright sub-mm emission associated with a recently discovered extensive (>100/h kpc) and highly luminous, `blob' of Ly-alpha emission at z=3.09. The blob lies within a known large overdensity of optical sources in the z=3.07-3.11 range, and is centered on a locally overdense peak within this region. The best explanation for the copious sub-mm emission is a dust obscured continuum source, which may produce the ionizing flux for the Ly-alpha cloud. Cooling gas explanations are plausible but excessively complicated, and the 450/850 micron ratio rules out a significant fraction of the signal arising from the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich increment. At least two additional ~10 mJy sub-mm detections in the SCUBA map, with a surface density significantly higher than in blank field surveys, suggests that they may be associated with the z=3.09 structure. A SCUBA `photometry' observation of a second nearby Ly-alpha blob tentatively detects a weaker sub-mm counterpart.