• We create stacked composite absorption spectra from Hubble Space Telescope Faint Object Spectrograph data from four quasi-stellar objects to search for absorption lines in the extreme ultraviolet wavelength region associated with LyA forest absorbers in the redshift range 1.6 < z < 2.9. We successfully detect O V 630 in LyA absorbers throughout the 10^13 to 10^16.2 cm^-2 column density range. For a sample of absorbers with 10^13.2 < N(H I) < 10^14.2 cm^-2, corresponding to gas densities ranging from around the universal mean to overdensities of a few, we measure an O V 630 equivalent width of 10.9 +/- 3.7 mA. We estimate the detection is real with at least 99% confidence. We only detect O IV 788, O IV 554, O III 833, and HeI 584 in absorbers with LyA equivalent widths > 0.6 A, which are likely associated with traditional metal-line systems. We find no evidence in any subsamples for absorption from N IV 765, NeV 568, NeVI 559, NeVIII 770, 780, or MgX 610, 625. The measured equivalent widths of O V suggest values of <O V / H I> in the range -1.7 to -0.6 for 10^13.2 < N(H I) < 10^15 cm^-2. The lack of detectable O IV absorption except in the strongest absorption systems suggests a hard ionizing background similar to the standard Haardt & Madau spectrum. Using photoionization models, we estimate that the oxygen abundance in the intergalactic medium with respect to the solar value is [O / H] around -2.2 to -1.3. Comparing to studies of C IV, we estimate [O / C] around 0.3 to 1.2. The overabundance of oxygen relative to carbon agrees with other low-metallicity abundance measurements and suggests enrichment of the intergalactic medium by Type II supernovae.
  • We use a sample of 332 Hubble Space Telescope spectra of 184 QSOs with z > 0.33 to study the typical ultraviolet spectral properties of QSOs, with emphasis on the ionizing continuum. Our sample is nearly twice as large as that of Zheng et al. (1997) and provides much better spectral coverage in the extreme ultraviolet (EUV). The overall composite continuum can be described by a power law with index alpha_EUV = -1.76 +/- 0.12 (f_nu ~ nu^alpha) between 500 and 1200 Angstroms. The corresponding results for subsamples of radio-quiet and radio-loud QSOs are alpha_EUV = -1.57 +/- 0.17 and alpha_EUV = -1.96 +/- 0.12, respectively. We also derive alpha_EUV for as many individual objects in our sample as possible, totaling 39 radio-quiet and 40 radio-loud QSOs. The typical individually measured values of alpha_EUV are in good agreement with the composites. We find no evidence for evolution of alpha_EUV with redshift for either radio-loud or radio-quiet QSOs. However, we do find marginal evidence for a trend towards harder EUV spectra with increasing luminosity for radio-loud objects. An extrapolation of our radio-quiet QSO spectrum is consistent with existing X-ray data, suggesting that the ionizing continuum may be represented by a single power law. The resulting spectrum is roughly in agreement with models of the intergalactic medium photoionized by the integrated radiation from QSOs.
  • The neutral hydrogen and the ionized helium absorption in the spectra of quasars are unique probes of structure in the early universe. We present Far-Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer observations of the line of sight to the quasar HE2347-4342 in the 1000-1187 A band at a resolving power of 15,000. We resolve the He II Ly alpha absorption as a discrete forest of absorption lines in the redshift range 2.3 to 2.7. About 50 percent of these features have H I counterparts with column densities log N(HI) > 12.3 that account for most of the observed opacity in He II Ly alpha. The He II to H I column density ratio ranges from 1 to >1000 with an average of ~80. Ratios of <100 are consistent with photoionization of the absorbing gas by a hard ionizing spectrum resulting from the integrated light of quasars, but ratios of >100 in many locations indicate additional contributions from starburst galaxies or heavily filtered quasar radiation. The presence of He II Ly alpha absorbers with no H I counterparts indicates that structure is present even in low-density regions, consistent with theoretical predictions of structure formation through gravitational instability.
  • We present a moderate-resolution (~20 km/s) spectrum of the mini broad-absorption-line QSO PG1351+64 between 915-1180 A, obtained with the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE). Additional spectra at longer wavelengths were also obtained with the HST and ground-based telescopes. Broad absorption is present on the blue wings of CIII 977, Ly-beta, OVI 1032,1038, Ly-alpha, NV 1238,1242, SiIV 1393,1402, and CIV 1548,1450. The absorption profile can be fitted with five components at velocities of ~ -780, -1049, -1629, -1833, and -3054 km/s with respect to the emission-line redshift of z = 0.088. All the absorption components cover a large fraction of the continuum source as well as the broad-line region. The OVI emission feature is very weak, and the OVI/Lyalpha flux ratio is 0.08, one of the lowest among low-redshift active galaxies and QSOs. The UV continuum shows a significant change in slope near 1050 A in the restframe. The steeper continuum shortward of the Lyman limit extrapolates well to the observed weak X-ray flux level. The absorbers' properties are similar to those of high-redshift broad absorption-line QSOs. The derived total column density of the UV absorbers is on the order of 10^21 cm^-2, unlikely to produce significant opacity above 1 keV in the X-ray. Unless there is a separate, high-ionization X-ray absorber, the QSO's weak X-ray flux may be intrinsic. The ionization level of the absorbing components is comparable to that anticipated in the broad-line region, therefore the absorbers may be related to broad-line clouds along the line of sight.
  • We report the discovery of five quasars with redshifts of 4.67 - 5.27 and z'-band magnitudes of 19.5-20.7 M_B ~ -27. All were originally selected as distant quasar candidates in optical/near-infrared photometry from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), and most were confirmed as probable high-redshift quasars by supplementing the SDSS data with J and K measurements. The quasars possess strong, broad Lyman-alpha emission lines, with the characteristic sharp cutoff on the blue side produced by Lyman-alpha forest absorption. Three quasars contain strong, broad absorption features, and one of them exhibits very strong N V emission. The amount of absorption produced by the Lyman-alpha forest increases toward higher redshift, and that in the z=5.27 object (D_A ~ 0.7) is consistent with a smooth extrapolation of the absorption seen in lower redshift quasars. The high luminosity of these objects relative to most other known objects at z >~ 5 makes them potentially valuable as probes of early quasar properties and of the intervening intergalactic medium.
  • We observed the Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 4151 on eleven occasions at 1-2 day intervals using the Berkeley spectrometer during the ORFEUS-SPAS II mission in 1996 November. The mean spectrum covers 912-1220 A at ~0.3 A resolution with a total exposure of 15,658 seconds. The mean flux at 1000 A was 4.7e-13 erg/cm^2/s/A. We identify the neutral hydrogen absorption with a number of components that correspond to the velocity distribution of \ion{H}{1} seen in our own Galaxy as well as features identified in the CIV 1549 absorption profile by Weymann et al. The main component of neutral hydrogen in NGC 4151 has a total column density of log N_HI = 18.7 +/- 1.5 cm^{-2} for a Doppler parameter b=250 +/- 50 km/s, and it covers 84 +/- 6% of the source. This is consistent with previous results obtained with the Hopkins Ultraviolet Telescope. Other intrinsic far-UV absorption features are not resolved, but the CIII* 1176 absorption line has a significantly higher blueshift relative to NGC 4151 than the CIII 977 resonance line. This implies that the highest velocity region of the outflowing gas has the highest density. Variations in the equivalent width of the CIII* 1176 absorption line anticorrelate with continuum variations on timescales of days. For an ionization timescale <1 day, we set an upper limit of 25 pc on the distance of the absorbing gas from the central source. The OVI 1034 and HeII 1085 emission lines also vary on timescales of 1-2 days, but their response to the continuum variations is complex. For some continuum variations they show no response, while for others the response is instantaneous to the limit of our sampling interval.
  • We have obtained a far-ultraviolet spectrum of the X-ray binary Hercules X-1/HZ Herculis using the Hopkins Ultraviolet Telescope aboard the Astro-1 space shuttle mission in 1990 December. This is the first spectrum of Her X-1 that extends down to the Lyman limit at 912 A. We observed emission lines of O VI, N V, and C IV, and the far UV continuum extending to the Lyman limit. We examine the conditions of the emitting gas through line strengths, line ratios, and doublet ratios. The UV flux is lower by about a factor of 2 than expected at the orbital phase of the observation. We model the UV continuum with a simple power-law and with a detailed model of an X-ray-illuminated accretion disk and companion star. The power-law provides a superior fit, as the detailed model predicts too little flux below 1200 A. We note, however, that there are uncertainties in the interstellar reddening, in the background airglow spectrum, and in the long-term phase of the accretion disk. We have searched the data for UV line and continuum pulsations near the neutron star spin period but found none at a detectable level.
  • We construct a composite quasar spectrum from 284 HST FOS spectra of 101 quasars with redshifts z > 0.33. The spectrum covers the wavelengths between 350 and 3000 A in the rest frame. There is a significant steepening of the continuum slope around 1050 A. The continuum between 1050 and 2200 A can be modeled as a power law with alpha = -0.99. For the full sample the power-law index in the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) between 350 and 1050 A is alpha = -1.96. The continuum flux in the wavelengths near the Lyman limit shows a depression of about 10 percent. The break in the power-law index and the slight depression of the continuum near the Lyman limit are features expected in Comptonized accretion-disk spectra.
  • We observed the Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 3516 twice during the flight of Astro-2 using the Hopkins Ultraviolet Telescope in March 1995. Simultaneous X-ray observations were performed with ASCA. Our far-ultraviolet spectra cover the spectral range 820-1840 A with a resolution of 2-4 A. No significant variations were found between the two observations. The total spectrum shows a red continuum, $f_\nu \sim \nu^{-1.89}$, with an observed flux of $\rm 2.2 \times 10^{-14}~erg~cm^{-2}~s^{-1}~\AA^{-1}$ at 1450 A, slightly above the historical mean. Intrinsic absorption in Lyman $\beta$ is visible as well as absorption from O~vi 1032,1038, N~v 1239,1243, Si~iv 1394,1403, and C~iv 1548,1551. The UV absorption lines are far weaker than is usual for NGC~3516, and also lie closer to the emission line redshift rather than showing the blueshift typical of these lines when they are strong. The neutral hydrogen absorption, however, is blueshifted by $400~\rm km~s^{-1}$ relative to the systemic velocity, and it is opaque at the Lyman limit. The sharpness of the cutoff indicates a low effective Doppler parameter, $b < \rm 20~km~s^{-1}$. For $b = \rm 10~km~s^{-1}$ the derived intrinsic column is $\rm 3.5 \times 10^{17}~cm^{-2}$. As in NGC~4151, a single warm absorber cannot produce the strong absorption visible over the wide range of observed ionization states. Matching both the UV and X-ray absorption simultaneously requires absorbers spanning a range of $10^3$ in both ionization parameter and column density.
  • We obtained X-ray spectra of the Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC~3516 in March 1995 using ASCA. Simultaneous far-UV observations were obtained with HUT on the Astro-2 shuttle mission. The ASCA spectrum shows a lightly absorbed power law of energy index 0.78. The low energy absorbing column is significantly less than previously seen. Prominent O~vii and O~viii absorption edges are visible, but, consistent with the much lower total absorbing column, no Fe K absorption edge is detectable. A weak, narrow Fe~K$\alpha$ emission line from cold material is present as well as a broad Fe~K$\alpha$ line. These features are similar to those reported in other Seyfert 1 galaxies. A single warm absorber model provides only an imperfect description of the low energy absorption. In addition to a highly ionized absorber with ionization parameter $U = 1.66$ and a total column density of $1.4 \times 10^{22}~\rm cm^{-2}$, adding a lower ionization absorber with $U = 0.32$ and a total column of $6.9 \times 10^{21}~\rm cm^{-2}$ significantly improves the fit. The contribution of resonant line scattering to our warm absorber models limits the Doppler parameter to $< 160~\rm km~s^{-1}$ at 90\% confidence. Turbulence at the sound speed of the photoionized gas provides the best fit. None of the warm absorber models fit to the X-ray spectrum can match the observed equivalent widths of all the UV absorption lines. Accounting for the X-ray and UV absorption simultaneously requires an absorbing region with a broad range of ionization parameters and column densities.