• Context. Stellar activity is currently challenging the detection of young planets via the radial velocity (RV) technique. Aims. We attempt to definitively discriminate the nature of the RV variations for the young active K5 star BD+20 1790, for which visible (VIS) RV measurements show divergent results on the existence of a substellar companion. Methods. We compare VIS data with high precision RVs in the near infrared (NIR) range by using the GIANO - B and IGRINS spectrographs. In addition, we present for the first time simultaneous VIS-NIR observations obtained with GIARPS (GIANO - B and HARPS - N) at Telescopio Nazionale Galileo (TNG). Orbital RVs are achromatic, so the RV amplitude does not change at different wavelengths, while stellar activity induces wavelength-dependent RV variations, which are significantly reduced in the NIR range with respect to the VIS. Results. The NIR radial velocity measurements from GIANO - B and IGRINS show an average amplitude of about one quarter with respect to previously published VIS data, as expected when the RV jitter is due to stellar activity. Coeval multi-band photometry surprisingly shows larger amplitudes in the NIR range, explainable with a mixture of cool and hot spots in the same active region. Conclusions. In this work, the claimed massive planet around BD+20 1790 is ruled out by our data. We exploited the crucial role of multi- wavelength spectroscopy when observing young active stars: thanks to facilities like GIARPS that provide simultaneous observations, this method can reach its maximum potential.
  • Stellar activity is the ultimate source of radial-velocity (RV) noise in the search for Earth-mass planets orbiting late-type main-sequence stars. We analyse the performance of four different indicators and the chromospheric index $\log R'_{\rm HK}$ in detecting RV variations induced by stellar activity in 15 slowly rotating ($v\sin i \leq 5$ km/s), weakly active ($\log R'_{\rm HK} \leq -4.95$) solar-like stars observed with the high-resolution spectrograph HARPS-N. We consider indicators of the asymmetry of the cross-correlation function (CCF) between the stellar spectrum and the binary weighted line mask used to compute the RV, that is the bisector inverse span (BIS), $\Delta V$, and a new indicator $V_{\rm asy(mod)}$ together with the full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the CCF. We present methods to evaluate the uncertainties of the CCF indicators and apply a kernel regression (KR) between the RV, the time, and each of the indicators to study their capability of reproducing the RV variations induced by stellar activity. The considered indicators together with the KR prove to be useful to detect activity-induced RV variations in $47 \pm 18$ percent of the stars over a two-year time span when a significance (two-sided p-value) threshold of one percent is adopted. In those cases, KR reduces the standard deviation of the RV time series by a factor of approximately two. The BIS, the FWHM, and the newly introduced $V_{\rm asy(mod)}$ are the best indicators, being useful in $27 \pm 13$, $13 \pm 9$, and $13 \pm 9$ percent of the cases, respectively. The relatively limited performances of the activity indicators are related to the very low activity level and $v\sin i$ of the considered stars. For the application of our approach to sun-like stars, a spectral resolution of at least $10^5$ and highly stabilized spectrographs are recommended.
  • We present 20 years of radial velocity (RV) measurements of the M1 dwarf Gl15A, combining 5 years of intensive RV monitoring with the HARPS-N spectrograph with 15 years of archival HIRES/Keck RV data. We carry out an MCMC-based analysis of the RV time series, inclusive of Gaussian Process (GP) approach to the description of stellar activity induced RV variations. Our analysis confirms the Keplerian nature and refines the orbital solution for the 11.44-day period super Earth, Gl15A\,b, reducing its amplitude to $1.68^{+0.17}_{-0.18}$ m s$^{-1}$ ($M \sin i = 3.03^{+0.46}_{-0.44}$ M$_\oplus$), and successfully models a long-term trend in the combined RV dataset in terms of a Keplerian orbit with a period around 7600 days and an amplitude of $2.5^{+1.3}_{-1.0}$ m s$^{-1}$, corresponding to a super-Neptune mass ($M \sin i = 36^{+25}_{-18}$ M$_\oplus$) planetary companion. We also discuss the present orbital configuration of Gl15A planetary system in terms of the possible outcomes of Lidov-Kozai interactions with the wide-separation companion Gl15B in a suite of detailed numerical simulations. In order to improve the results of the dynamical analysis, we derive a new orbital solution for the binary system, combining our RV measurements with astrometric data from the WDS catalogue. The eccentric Lidov-Kozai analysis shows the strong influence of Gl15B on the Gl15A planetary system, which can produce orbits compatible with the observed configuration for initial inclinations of the planetary system between $75^\circ$ and $90^\circ$, and can also enhance the eccentricity of the outer planet well above the observed value, even resulting in orbital instability, for inclinations around $0^\circ$ and $15^\circ - 30^\circ$. The Gl15A system is the multi-planet system closest to Earth, at $3.57$ pc, and hosts the longest period RV sub-jovian mass planet discovered so far.
  • We characterised five transiting planetary systems (HAT-P-3, HAT-P-12, HAT-P-22, WASP-39 and WASP-60) and determined their sky-projected planet orbital obliquity through the measurement of the RM effect. We used HARPS-N high-precision radial velocity measurements, gathered during transit events, to measure the RM effect in the target systems and determine the sky-projected angle between the planetary orbital plane and the stellar equator. The characterisation of stellar atmospheric parameters was performed exploiting the HARPS-N spectra, using line equivalent width ratios, and spectral synthesis methods. Photometric parameters of the five transiting exoplanets were re-analysed through 17 new light curves, obtained with an array of medium-class telescopes, and other light curves from the literature. Survey-time-series photometric data were analysed for determining the rotation periods of the five stars and their spin inclination. From the analysis of the RM effect we derived a sky-projected obliquity of 21.2 degree, -54 degree, -2.1 degree, 0 degree and -129 degree for HAT-P-3b, HAT-P-12b, HAT-P-22b, WASP-39b and WASP-60b, respectively. The latter value indicates that WASP-60b is moving on a retrograde orbit. These values represent the first measurements of \lambda for the five exoplanetary systems under study. The stellar activity of HAT-P-22 indicates a rotation period of 28.7 days, which allowed us to estimate the true misalignment angle of HAT-P-22b, \psi=24 degree. The revision of the physical parameters of the five exoplanetary systems returned values that are fully compatible with those existing in the literature. The exception to this is the WASP-60 system, for which, based on higher quality spectroscopic and photometric data, we found a more massive and younger star and a larger and hotter planet.
  • M-dwarf stars are promising targets for identifying and characterizing potentially habitable planets. K2-3 is a nearby (45 pc), early-type M dwarf hosting three small transiting planets, the outermost of which orbits close to the inner edge of the stellar (optimistic) habitable zone. The K2-3 system is well suited for follow-up characterization studies aimed at determining accurate masses and bulk densities of the three planets. Using a total of 329 radial velocity measurements collected over 2.5 years with the HARPS-N and HARPS spectrographs and a proper treatment of the stellar activity signal, we aim to improve measurements of the masses and bulk densities of the K2-3 planets. We use our results to investigate the physical structure of the planets. We analyse radial velocity time series extracted with two independent pipelines by using Gaussian process regression. We adopt a quasi-periodic kernel to model the stellar magnetic activity jointly with the planetary signals. We use Monte Carlo simulations to investigate the robustness of our mass measurements of K2-3\,c and K2-3\,d, and to explore how additional high-cadence radial velocity observations might improve them. Despite the stellar activity component being the strongest signal present in the radial velocity time series, we are able to derive masses for both planet b ($M_{\rm b}=6.6\pm1.1$ $M_{\rm \oplus}$) and planet c ($M_{\rm c}=3.1^{+1.3}_{-1.2}$ $M_{\rm \oplus}$). The Doppler signal due to K2-3\,d remains undetected, likely because of its low amplitude compared to the radial velocity signal induced by the stellar activity. The closeness of the orbital period of K2-3\,d to the stellar rotation period could also make the detection of the planetary signal complicated. [...]
  • WASP-18 hosts a massive, very close-in Jupiter-like planet. Despite its young age ($<$1 Gyr), the star presents an anomalously low stellar activity level: the measured logR'$_{\rm HK}$ activity parameter lies slightly below the basal level; there is no significant time-variability in the logR'$_{\rm HK}$ value; there is no detection of the star in the X-rays. We present results of far-UV observations of WASP-18 obtained with COS on board of Hubble Space Telescope aimed at explaining this anomaly. From the star's spectral energy distribution, we infer the extinction (E(B-V) $\approx$ 0.01 mag) and then the interstellar medium (ISM) column density for a number of ions, concluding that ISM absorption is not the origin of the anomaly. We measure the flux of the four stellar emission features detected in the COS spectrum (CII, CIII, CIV, SiIV). Comparing the CII/CIV flux ratio measured for WASP-18 with that derived from spectra of nearby stars with known age, we see that the far-UV spectrum of WASP-18 resembles that of old ($>$5 Gyr), inactive stars, in stark contrast with its young age. We conclude that WASP-18 has an intrinsically low activity level, possibly caused by star-planet tidal interaction, as suggested by previous studies. Re-scaling the solar irradiance reference spectrum to match the flux of the SiIV line, yields an XUV integrated flux at the planet orbit of 10.2 erg cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$. We employ the rescaled XUV solar fluxes to models of the planetary upper atmosphere, deriving an extremely low thermal mass-loss rate of 10$^{-20}$ $M_{\rm J}$ Gyr$^{-1}$. For such high-mass planets, thermal escape is not energy limited, but driven by Jeans escape.
  • The interaction between the magnetic fields of late-type stars and their close-by planets may produce stellar flares as observed in active binary systems. However, in spite of several claims, conclusive evidence is still lacking. We estimate the magnetic energy available in the interaction using analytical models to provide an upper bound to the expected flare energy. We investigate three different mechanisms leading to magnetic energy release. The first two can release an energy up to $(0.2-1.2) B^{2}_{0} R^{3}/\mu$, where $B_{0}$ is the surface field of the star, $R$ its radius, and $\mu$ the magnetic permeability of the plasma. They operate in young active stars whose coronae have closed magnetic field lines up to the distance of their close-by planets that can trigger the energy release. The third mechanism operates in weakly or moderately active stars having a coronal field with predominantly open field lines at the distance of their planets. The released energy is of the order of $(0.002-0.1) B^{2}_{0} R^{3}/\mu$ and depends on the ratio of the planetary to the stellar fields, thus allowing an indirect measurement of the former when the latter is known. We compute the released energy for different separations of the planet and different stellar parameters finding the conditions for the operation of the proposed mechanisms. An application to eight selected systems is presented. The computed energies and dissipation timescales are in agreement with flare observations in the eccentric system HD 17156 and in the circular systems HD 189733 and HD 179949. This kind of star-planet interaction can be unambiguously identified by the higher flaring frequency expected close to periastron in eccentric systems.
  • We carried out a Bayesian homogeneous determination of the orbital parameters of 231 transiting giant planets (TGPs) that are alone or have distant companions; we employed DE-MCMC methods to analyse radial-velocity (RV) data from the literature and 782 new high-accuracy RVs obtained with the HARPS-N spectrograph for 45 systems over 3 years. Our work yields the largest sample of systems with a transiting giant exoplanet and coherently determined orbital, planetary, and stellar parameters. We found that the orbital parameters of TGPs in non-compact planetary systems are clearly shaped by tides raised by their host stars. Indeed, the most eccentric planets have relatively large orbital separations and/or high mass ratios, as expected from the equilibrium tide theory. This feature would be the outcome of high-eccentricity migration (HEM). The distribution of $\alpha=a/a_R$, where $a$ and $a_R$ are the semi-major axis and the Roche limit, for well-determined circular orbits peaks at 2.5; this also agrees with expectations from the HEM. The few planets of our sample with circular orbits and $\alpha >5$ values may have migrated through disc-planet interactions instead of HEM. By comparing circularisation times with stellar ages, we found that hot Jupiters with $a < 0.05$ au have modified tidal quality factors $10^{5} < Q'_p < 10^{9}$, and that stellar $Q'_s > 10^{6}-10^{7}$ are required to explain the presence of eccentric planets at the same orbital distance. As a by-product of our analysis, we detected a non-zero eccentricity for HAT-P-29; we determined that five planets that were previously regarded to have hints of non-zero eccentricity have circular orbits or undetermined eccentricities; we unveiled curvatures caused by distant companions in the RV time series of HAT-P-2, HAT-P-22, and HAT-P-29; and we revised the planetary parameters of CoRoT-1b.
  • Context. Identification of planetary companions of giant stars is made difficult because of the astrophysical noise, that may produce radial velocity (RV) variations similar to those induced by a companion. On the other hand any stellar signal is wavelength dependent, while signals due to a companion are achromatic. Aims. Our goal is to determine the origin of the Doppler periodic variations observed in the thick disk K giant star TYC 4282-605-1 by HARPS-N at the Telescopio Nazionale Galileo (TNG) and verify if they can be due to the presence of a substellar companion. Methods. Several methods have been used to exclude the stellar origin of the observed signal including detailed analysis of activity indicators and bisector and the analysis of the photometric light curve. Finally we have conducted an observational campaign to monitor the near infrared (NIR) RV with GIANO at the TNG in order to verify whether the NIR amplitude variations are comparable with those observed in the visible. Results. Both optical and NIR RVs show consistent variations with a period at 101 days and similar amplitude, pointing to the presence of a companion orbiting the target. The main orbital properties obtained for our giant star with a derived mass of M=0.97+-0.03M_sun are M_Psini=10.78+-0.12MJ;P=101.54+-0.05days;e=0.28+-0.01 and a=0.422+-0.009AU. The chemical analysis shows a significant enrichment in the abundance of Nai, Mgi, Ali and S i while the rest of analyzed elements are consistent with the solar value demonstrating that the chemical composition corresponds with an old K giant (age = 10.1 Gyr) belonging to local thick disk. Conclusions. We conclude that the substellar companion hypothesis for this K giant is the best explanation for the observed periodic RV variation. This study also shows the high potential of multi-wavelength RV observations for the validation of planet candidates.
  • We report the discovery of a super-Earth orbiting at the inner edge of the habitable zone of the star GJ 625 based on the analysis of the radial-velocity (RV) time series from the HARPS-N spectrograph, consisting in 151 HARPS-N measurements taken over 3.5 yr. GJ 625 b is a planet with a minimum mass M sin $i$ of 2.82 $\pm$ 0.51 M$_{\oplus}$ with an orbital period of 14.628 $\pm$ 0.013 days at a distance of 0.078 AU of its parent star. The host star is the quiet M2 V star GJ 625, located at 6.5 pc from the Sun. We find the presence of a second radial velocity signal in the range 74-85 days that we relate to stellar rotation after analysing the time series of Ca II H\&K and H${\alpha}$ spectroscopic indicators, the variations of the FWHM of the CCF and and the APT2 photometric light curves. We find no evidence linking the short period radial velocity signal to any activity proxy.
  • Past UV and optical observations of stars hosting hot Jupiters have shown that some of these stars present an anomalously low chromospheric activity, significantly below the basal level. For WASP-13, observations have shown that the apparent lack of activity is possibly caused by absorption from the intervening ISM. Inspired by this result, we study the effect of ISM absorption on activity measurements (S and logR'$_{\rm HK}$ indices) for main-sequence late-type stars. To this end, we employ synthetic stellar photospheric spectra combined with varying amounts of chromospheric emission and ISM absorption. We present the effect of ISM absorption on activity measurements by varying several instrumental, stellar, and ISM parameters. We find that for relative velocities between the stellar and ISM lines smaller than 30-40 km/s and for ISM CaII column densities logN$_{\rm CaII}$>12, the ISM absorption has a significant influence on activity measurements. Direct measurements and three dimensional maps of the Galactic ISM absorption indicate that an ISM CaII column density of logN$_{\rm CaII}$=12 is typically reached by a distance of about 100 pc along most sight lines. In particular, for a Sun-like star lying at a distance greater than 100 pc, we expect a depression (bias) in the logR'$_{\rm HK}$ value larger than 0.05-0.1 dex, about the same size as the typical measurement and calibration uncertainties on this parameter. This work shows that the bias introduced by ISM absorption must always be considered when measuring activity for stars lying beyond 100 pc. We also consider the effect of multiple ISM absorption components. We discuss the relevance of this result for exoplanet studies.
  • In order to understand the observed physical and orbital diversity of extrasolar planetary systems, a full investigation of these objects and of their host stars is necessary. Within this field, one of the main purposes of the GAPS observing project with HARPS-N@TNG is to provide a more detailed characterisation of already known systems. In this framework we monitored the star, hosting two giant planets, HD108874, with HARPS-N for three years in order to refine the orbits, to improve the dynamical study and to search for additional low-mass planets in close orbits. We subtracted the radial velocity (RV) signal due to the known outer planets, finding a clear modulation of 40.2 d period. We analysed the correlation between RV residuals and the activity indicators and modelled the magnetic activity with a dedicated code. Our analysis suggests that the 40.2 d periodicity is a signature of the rotation period of the star. A refined orbital solution is provided, revealing that the system is close to a mean motion resonance of about 9:2, in a stable configuration over 1 Gyr. Stable orbits for low-mass planets are limited to regions very close to the star or far from it. Our data exclude super-Earths with Msin i \gtrsim 5 M_Earth within 0.4 AU and objects with Msin i \gtrsim 2 M_Earth with orbital periods of a few days. Finally we put constraints on the habitable zone of the system, assuming the presence of an exomoon orbiting the inner giant planet.
  • The distribution of exoplanets around low-mass stars is still not well understood. Such stars, however, present an excellent opportunity of reaching down to the rocky and habitable planet domains. The number of current detections used for statistical purposes is still quite modest and different surveys, using both photometry and precise radial velocities, are searching for planets around M dwarfs. Our HARPS-N red dwarf exoplanet survey is aimed at the detection of new planets around a sample of 78 selected stars, together with the subsequent characterization of their activity properties. Here we investigate the survey performance and strategy. From 2700 observed spectra, we compare the radial velocity determinations of the HARPS-N DRS pipeline and the HARPS-TERRA code, we calculate the mean activity jitter level, we evaluate the planet detection expectations, and we address the general question of how to define the strategy of spectroscopic surveys in order to be most efficient in the detection of planets. We find that the HARPS-TERRA radial velocities show less scatter and we calculate a mean activity jitter of 2.3 m/s for our sample. For a general radial velocity survey with limited observing time, the number of observations per star is key for the detection efficiency. In the case of an early M-type target sample, we conclude that approximately 50 observations per star with exposure times of 900 s and precisions of about 1 m/s maximizes the number of planet detections.
  • The present study reports the discovery of Sun-like stars, namely main-sequence stars with $T_{\rm eff}$, $\log g$ and rotation periods $P_{rot}$ similar to solar values, presenting evidence of surface differential rotation. An autocorrelation of the time series was used to select stars presenting photometric signal stability from a sample of 881 stars with light curves collected by the $Kepler$ space-borne telescope, in which we have identified 17 stars with stable signals. A simple two-spot model together with a Bayesian information criterion were applied to these stars in the search for indications of differential rotation; in addition, for all 17 stars, it was possible to compute the spot rotation period $P$, the mean values of the individual spot rotation periods and their respective colatitudes, and the relative amplitude of the differential rotation.
  • [Abridged] Context. Stellar activity is an important source of systematic errors and uncertainties in the characterization of exoplanets. Most of the techniques used to correct for this activity focus on an ad hoc data reduction. Aims. We have developed a software for the combined fit of transits and stellar activity features in high-precision long-duration photometry. Our aim is to take advantage of the modelling to derive correct stellar and planetary parameters, even in the case of strong stellar activity. Methods. We use an analytic approach to model the light curve. The code KSint, modified by adding the evolution of active regions, is implemented into our Bayesian modelling package PASTIS. The code is then applied to the light curve of CoRoT-2. The light curve is divided in segments to reduce the number of free parameters needed by the fit. We perform a Markov chain Monte Carlo analysis in two ways. In the first, we perform a global and independent modelling of each segment of the light curve, transits are not normalized and are fitted together with the activity features, and occulted features are taken into account during the transit fit. In the second, we normalize the transits with a model of the non-occulted activity features, and then we apply a standard transit fit, which does not take the occulted features into account. Results. Our model recovers the activity features coverage of the stellar surface and different rotation periods for different features. We find variations in the transit parameters of different segments and show that they are likely due to the division applied to the light curve. Neglecting stellar activity or even only bright spots while normalizing the transits yields a $\sim 1.2\sigma$ larger and $2.3\sigma$ smaller transit depth, respectively. The stellar density also presents up to $2.5\sigma$ differences depending on the normalization technique...
  • Context. M dwarfs are considered ideal targets for Doppler radial velocity searches. Nonetheless, the statistics of frequency of low-mass planets hosted by low mass stars remains poorly constrained. Aims. Our M-dwarf radial velocity monitoring with HARPS-N can provide a major contribution to the widening of the current statistics through the in-depth analysis of accurate radial velocity observations in a narrow range of spectral sub-types (79 stars, between dM0 to dM3). Spectral accuracy will enable us to reach the precision needed to detect small planets with a few earth masses. Our survey will bring a contribute to the surveys devoted to the search for planets around M-dwarfs, mainly focused on the M-dwarf population of the northern emisphere, for which we will provide an estimate of the planet occurence. Methods. We present here a long duration radial velocity monitoring of the M1 dwarf star GJ 3998 with HARPS-N to identify periodic signals in the data. Almost simultaneous photometric observations were carried out within the APACHE and EXORAP programs to characterize the stellar activity and to distinguish from the periodic signals those due to activity and to the presence of planetary companions. Results. The radial velocities have a dispersion in excess of their internal errors due to at least four superimposed signals, with periods of 30.7, 13.7, 42.5 and 2.65 days. The analysis of spectral indices based on Ca II H & K and Halpha lines demonstrates that the periods of 30.7 and 42.5 days are due to chromospheric inhomogeneities modulated by stellar rotation and differential rotation. The shorter periods of 13.74 +/- 0.02 d and 2.6498 +/- 0.0008 d are well explained with the presence of two planets, with minimum masses of 6.26 +/- 0.79 MEarth and 2.47 +/- 0.27 MEarth and distances of 0.089 AU and 0.029 AU from the host, respectively.
  • We introduce a general mathematical framework to model the internal transport of angular momentum in a star hosting a close-in planetary/stellar companion. By assuming that the tidal and rotational distortions are small and that the deposit/extraction of angular momentum induced by stellar winds and tidal torques are redistributed solely by an effective eddy-viscosity that depends on the radial coordinate, we can formulate the model in a completely analytic way. It allows us to compute simultaneously the evolution of the orbit of the companion and of the spin and the radial differential rotation of the star. An illustrative application to the case of an F-type main-sequence star hosting a hot Jupiter is presented. The general relevance of our model to test more sophisticated numerical dynamical models and to study the internal rotation profile of exoplanet hosts, submitted to the combined effects of tides and stellar winds, by means of asteroseismology are discussed.
  • The space telescope CoRoT has provided light curves of T Tauri stars belonging to the star-forming region of NGC 2264 with unprecedented continuity and precision in the framework of a coordinated multi-wavelength observational project. We perform spot modelling of the optical light curves of five weak-line T Tauri stars whose variability is dominated by starspots. We apply two-spot and evolving single spot models in the framework of a Bayesian Monte Carlo Markov Chain approach to derive the a posteriori distribution of the starspot parameters and the inclination of the star rotation axis. We focus on the rotation periods of the spots that can provide evidence for differential rotation in those stars. We find meaningful results in the case of three stars with an inclination higher than 50 deg and a slow variation of the light curve amplitude. The relative difference of the spot rotation periods ranges from 0.02 to 0.05 that is 3-10 times larger than the amplitude of the differential rotation found in similar stars with Doppler imaging techniques. We conclude that the intrinsic starspot evolution, although very slow, has a significant impact on the determination of the differential rotation by means of our spot modelling approach. We estimate typical timescales for the evolution of the starspot pattern between about 20 and 50 rotation periods in our stars.
  • Surface differential rotation (SDR) plays a key role in dynamo models. SDR estimates are therefore essential for constraining theoretical models. We measure a lower limit to SDR in a sample of solar-like stars belonging to young associations with the aim of investigating how SDR depends on global stellar parameters in the age range (4-95 Myr). The rotation period of a solar-like star can be recovered by analyzing the flux modulation caused by dark spots and stellar rotation. The SDR and the latitude migration of dark-spots induce a modulation of the detected rotation period. We employ long-term photometry to measure the amplitude of such a modulation and to compute the quantity DeltaOmega_phot =2p/P_min -2pi/P_max that is a lower limit to SDR. We find that DeltaOmega_phot increases with the stellar effective temperature and with the global convective turn-over time-scale tau_c. We find that DeltaOmega_phot is proportional to Teff^2.18pm 0.65 in stars recently settled on the ZAMS. This power law is less steep than those found by previous authors, but closest to recent theoretical models. We find that DeltaOmega_phot steeply increases between 4 and 30 Myr and that itis almost constant between 30 and 95 Myr in a 1 M_sun star. We find also that the relative shear increases with the Rossby number Ro. Although our results are qualitatively in agreement with hydrodynamical mean-field models, our measurements are systematically higher than the values predicted by these models. The discrepancy between DeltaOmega_phot measurements and theoretical models is particularly large in stars with periods between 0.7 and 2 d. Such a discrepancy, together with the anomalous SDR measured by other authors for HD 171488 (rotating in 1.31 d), suggests that the rotation period could influence SDR more than predicted by the models.
  • Bright features have been recently discovered by Dawn on Ceres, which extend previous photometric and Space Telescope observations. These features should produce distortions of the line profiles of the reflected solar spectrum and therefore an apparent radial velocity variation modulated by the rotation of the dwarf planet. Here we report on two sequences of observations of Ceres performed in the nights of 31 July, 26-27 August 2015 by means of the high-precision HARPS spectrograph at the 3.6-m La Silla ESO telescope. The observations revealed a quite complex behaviour which likely combines a radial velocity modulation due to the rotation with an amplitude of approx +/- 6 m/s and an unexpected diurnal effect. The latter changes imply changes in the albedo of Occator's bright features due to the blaze produced by the exposure to solar radiation. The short-term variability of Ceres' albedo is on timescales ranging from hours to months and can both be confirmed and followed by means of dedicated radial velocity observations.
  • Stellar radial velocities play a fundamental role in the discovery of extrasolar planets and the measurement of their physical parameters as well as in the study of stellar physical properties. We investigate the impact of the solar activity on the radial velocity of the Sun using the HARPS spectrograph to obtain measurements that can be directly compared with those acquired in the extrasolar planet search programs. We use the Moon, the Galilean satellites, and several asteroids as reflectors to measure the radial velocity of the Sun as a star and correlate it with disc-integrated chromospheric and magnetic indexes of solar activity that are similar to stellar activity indexes. We discuss in detail the systematic effects that affect our measurements and the methods to account for them. We find that the radial velocity of the Sun as a star is positively correlated with the level of its chromospheric activity at about 95 percent significance level. The amplitude of the long-term variation measured in the 2006-2014 period is 4.98 \pm 1.44 m/s, in good agreement with model predictions. The standard deviation of the residuals obtained by subtracting a linear best fit is 2.82 m/s and is due to the rotation of the reflecting bodies and the intrinsic variability of the Sun on timescales shorter than the activity cycle. A correlation with a lower significance is detected between the radial velocity and the mean absolute value of the line-of-sight photospheric magnetic field flux density. Our results confirm similar correlations found in other late-type main-sequence stars and provide support to the predictions of radial velocity variations induced by stellar activity based on current models.
  • The chromospheric activity index logR'HK of stars hosting transiting hot Jupiters appears to be correlated with the planets' surface gravity. One of the possible explanations is based on the presence of condensations of planetary evaporated material located in a circumstellar cloud that absorbs the CaII H&K and MgII h&k resonance line emission flux, used to measure chromospheric activity. A larger column density in the condensations, or equivalently a stronger absorption in the chromospheric lines, is obtained when the evaporation rate of the planet is larger, which occurs for a lower gravity of the planet. We analyze here a sample of stars hosting transiting hot Jupiters tuned in order to minimize systematic effects (e.g., interstellar medium absorption). Using a mixture model, we find that the data are best fit by a two-linear-regression model. We interpret this result in terms of the Vaughan-Preston gap. We use a Monte Carlo approach to best take into account the uncertainties, finding that the two intercepts fit the observed peaks of the distribution of logR'HK for main-sequence solar-like stars. We also find that the intercepts are correlated with the slopes, as predicted by the model based on the condensations of planetary evaporated material. Our findings bring further support to this model, although we cannot firmly exclude different explanations. A precise determination of the slopes of the two linear components would allow one to estimate the average effective stellar flux powering planetary evaporation, which can then be used for theoretical population and evolution studies of close-in planets.
  • Binary stars hosting exoplanets are a unique laboratory where chemical tagging can be performed to measure with high accuracy the elemental abundances of both stellar components, with the aim to investigate the formation of planets and their subsequent evolution. Here, we present a high-precision differential abundance analysis of the XO-2 wide stellar binary based on high resolution HARPS-N@TNG spectra. Both components are very similar K-dwarfs and host planets. Since they formed presumably within the same molecular cloud, we expect they should possess the same initial elemental abundances. We investigate if the presence of planets can cause some chemical imprints in the stellar atmospheric abundances. We measure abundances of 25 elements for both stars with a range of condensation temperature $T_{\rm C}=40-1741$ K, achieving typical precisions of $\sim 0.07$ dex. The North component shows abundances in all elements higher by $+0.067 \pm 0.032$ dex on average, with a mean difference of +0.078 dex for elements with $T_{\rm C} > 800$ K. The significance of the XO-2N abundance difference relative to XO-2S is at the $2\sigma$ level for almost all elements. We discuss the possibility that this result could be interpreted as the signature of the ingestion of material by XO-2N or depletion in XO-2S due to locking of heavy elements by the planetary companions. We estimate a mass of several tens of $M_{\oplus}$ in heavy elements. The difference in abundances between XO-2N and XO-2S shows a positive correlation with the condensation temperatures of the elements, with a slope of $(4.7 \pm 0.9) \times 10^{-5}$ dex K$^{-1}$, which could mean that both components have not formed terrestrial planets, but that first experienced the accretion of rocky core interior to the subsequent giant planets.
  • We determine the true and the projected obliquity of HAT-P-36 and WASP-11/HAT-P-10 systems, respectively, which are both composed of a relatively cool star and a hot-Jupiter planet. Thanks to the high-resolution spectrograph HARPS-N, we observed the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect for both the systems by acquiring precise radial-velocity measurements during planetary transit events. We also present photometric observations comprising six light curves covering five transit events, obtained using three medium-class telescopes and the telescope-defocussing technique. One transit of WASP-11/HAT-P-10 was followed simultaneously from two observatories. The three transit light curves of HAT-P-36b show anomalies that are attributable to starspot complexes on the surface of the parent star, in agreement with the analysis of its spectra that indicate a moderate activity. By analysing the complete HATNet data set of HAT-P-36, we estimated the stellar rotation period by detecting a periodic photometric modulation in the light curve caused by star spots, obtaining Prot=15.3 days, which implies that the inclination of the stellar rotational axis with respect to the line of sight is 65 degree. We used the new spectroscopic and photometric data to revise the main physical parameters and measure the sky-projected misalignment angle of the two systems. We found \lambda=-14 degree for HAT-P-36 and \lambda=7 degree for WASP-11/HAT-P-10, indicating in both cases a good spin-orbit alignment. In the case of HAT-P-36, we also measured its real obliquity, which turned out to be 25 degrees.
  • Minor bodies of the solar system can be used to measure the spectrum of the Sun as a star by observing sunlight reflected by their surfaces. To perform an accurate measurement of the radial velocity of the Sun as a star by this method, it is necessary to take into account the Doppler shifts introduced by the motion of the reflecting body. Here we discuss the effect of its rotation. It gives a vanishing contribution only when the inclinations of the body rotation axis to the directions of the Sun and of the Earth observer are the same. When this is not the case, the perturbation of the radial velocity does not vanish and can reach up to about 2.4 m/s for an asteroid such as 2 Pallas that has an inclination of the spin axis to the plane of the ecliptic of about 30 degrees. We introduce a geometric model to compute the perturbation in the case of a uniformly reflecting body of spherical or triaxial ellipsoidal shape and provide general results to easily estimate the magnitude of the effect.