• The upcoming NASA Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) will obtain space-based uninterrupted light curves for a large sample of bright white dwarfs distributed across the entire sky, providing a very rich resource for asteroseismological studies and the search for transits from planetary debris. We have compiled an all-sky catalogue of ultraviolet, optical, and infrared photometry as well as proper motions, which we propose as an essential tool for the preliminary identification and characterisation of potential targets. We present data for 1864 known white dwarfs and 305 high-probability white dwarf candidates brighter than 17 mag. We describe the spectroscopic follow-up of 135 stars, of which 82 are white dwarfs and 25 are hot subdwarfs. The new confirmed stars include six pulsating white dwarf candidates (ZZ Cetis), and nine white dwarf binaries with a cool main-sequence companion. We identify one star with a spectroscopic distance of only 25 pc from the Sun. Around the time TESS is launched, we foresee that all white dwarfs in this sample will have trigonometric parallaxes measured by the ESA Gaia mission next year.
  • We present HST spectroscopy for 45 cataclysmic variables (CVs), observed with HST/COS and HST/STIS. For 36 CVs, the white dwarf is recognisable through its broad Ly$\alpha$ absorption profile and we measure the white dwarf effective temperatures ($T_{\mathrm{eff}}$) by fitting the HST data assuming $\log\,g=8.35$, which corresponds to the average mass for CV white dwarfs ($\simeq\,0.8\,\mathrm{M}_\odot$). Our results nearly double the number of CV white dwarfs with an accurate temperature measurement. We find that CVs above the period gap have, on average, higher temperatures ($\langle T_{\mathrm{eff}} \rangle \simeq 23\,000\,$K) and exhibit much more scatter compared to those below the gap ($\langle T_{\mathrm{eff}} \rangle \simeq 15\,000\,$K). While this behaviour broadly agrees with theoretical predictions, some discrepancies are present: (i) all our new measurements above the gap are characterised by lower temperatures ($T_{\mathrm{eff}} \simeq 16\,000 - 26\,000\,$K) than predicted by the present day CV population models ($T_{\mathrm{eff}} \simeq 38\,000 - 43\,000\,$K); (ii) our results below the gap are not clustered in the predicted narrow track and exhibit in particular a relatively large spread near the period minimum, which may point to some shortcomings in the CV evolutionary models. Finally, in the standard model of CV evolution, reaching the minimum period, CVs are expected to evolve back towards longer periods with mean accretion rates $\dot{M}\lesssim 2 \times 10^{-11}\,\mathrm{M}_\odot\,\mathrm{yr}^{-1}$, corresponding to $T_\mathrm{eff}\lesssim 11\,500\,$K. We do not unambiguously identify any such system in our survey, suggesting that this major component of the predicted CV population still remains elusive to observations.
  • We report the discovery of an extremely close white dwarf plus F dwarf main-sequence star in a 12 hour binary identified by combining data from the RAdial Velocity Experiment (RAVE) survey and the Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) survey. A combination of spectral energy distribution fitting and optical and Hubble Space Telescope ultraviolet spectroscopy allowed us to place fairly precise constraints on the physical parameters of the binary. The system, TYC 6760-497-1, consists of a hot Teff~20,000K, M~0.6Ms white dwarf and an F8 star (M~1.23Ms, R~1.3Rs) seen at a low inclination (i~37 deg). The system is likely the descendent of a binary that contained the F star and a ~2Ms A-type star that filled its Roche-lobe on the thermally pulsating asymptotic giant branch, initiating a common envelope phase. The F star is extremely close to Roche-lobe filling and there is likely to be a short phase of thermal timescale mass-transfer onto the white dwarf during which stable hydrogen burning occurs. During this phase it will grow in mass by up to 20 per cent, until the mass ratio reaches close to unity, at which point it will appear as a standard cataclysmic variable star. Therefore, TYC 6760-497-1 is the first known progenitor of a super-soft source system, but will not undergo a supernova Ia explosion. Once an accurate distance to the system is determined by Gaia, we will be able to place very tight constraints on the stellar and binary parameters.