• We realize a two-dimensional electron system (2DES) in ZnO by simply depositing pure aluminum on its surface in ultra-high vacuum, and characterize its electronic structure using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. The aluminum oxidizes into alumina by creating oxygen vacancies that dope the bulk conduction band of ZnO and confine the electrons near its surface. The electron density of the 2DES is up to two orders of magnitude higher than those obtained in ZnO heterostructures. The 2DES shows two $s$-type subbands, that we compare to the $d$-like 2DESs in titanates, with clear signatures of many-body interactions that we analyze through a self-consistent extraction of the system self-energy and a modeling as a coupling of a 2D Fermi liquid with a Debye distribution of phonons.
  • We report the electronic band structures and concomitant Fermi surfaces for a family of exfoliable tetradymite compounds with the formula $T_2$$Ch_2$$Pn$, obtained as a modification to the well-known topological insulator binaries Bi$_2$(Se,Te)$_3$ by replacing one chalcogen ($Ch$) with a pnictogen ($Pn$) and Bi with the tetravalent transition metals $T$ $=$ Ti, Zr, or Hf. This imbalances the electron count and results in layered metals characterized by relatively high carrier mobilities and bulk two-dimensional Fermi surfaces whose topography is well-described by first principles calculations. Intriguingly, slab electronic structure calculations predict Dirac-like surface states. In contrast to Bi$_2$Se$_3$, where the surface Dirac bands are at the $\Gamma-$point, for (Zr,Hf)$_2$Te$_2$(P,As) there are Dirac cones of strong topological character around both the $\bar {\Gamma}$- and $\bar {M}$-points which are above and below the Fermi energy, respectively. For Ti$_2$Te$_2$P the surface state is predicted to exist only around the $\bar {M}$-point. In agreement with these predictions, the surface states that are located below the Fermi energy are observed by angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy measurements, revealing that they coexist with the bulk metallic state. Thus, this family of materials provides a foundation upon which to develop novel phenomena that exploit both the bulk and surface states (e.g., topological superconductivity).
  • We study the effect of oxygen vacancies on the electronic structure of the model strongly correlated metal SrVO$_3$. By means of angle-resolved photoemission (ARPES) synchrotron experiments, we investigate the systematic effect of the UV dose on the measured spectra. We observe the onset of a spurious dose-dependent prominent peak at an energy range were the lower Hubbard band has been previously reported in this compound, raising questions on its previous interpretation. By a careful analysis of the dose dependent effects we succeed in disentangling the contributions coming from the oxygen vacancy states and from the lower Hubbard band. We obtain the intrinsic ARPES spectrum for the zero-vacancy limit, where a clear signal of a lower Hubbard band remains. We support our study by means of state-of-the-art ab initio calculations that include correlation effects and the presence of oxygen vacancies. Our results underscore the relevance of potential spurious states affecting ARPES experiments in correlated metals, which are associated to the ubiquitous oxygen vacancies as extensively reported in the context of a two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) at the surface of insulating $d^0$ transition metal oxides.
  • We report the existence of metallic two-dimensional electron gases (2DEGs) at the (001) and (101) surfaces of bulk-insulating TiO2 anatase due to local chemical doping by oxygen vacancies in the near-surface region. Using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, we find that the electronic structure at both surfaces is composed of two occupied subbands of d_xy orbital character. While the Fermi surface observed at the (001) termination is isotropic, the 2DEG at the (101) termination is anisotropic and shows a charge carrier density three times larger than at the (001) surface. Moreover, we demonstrate that intense UV synchrotron radiation can alter the electronic structure and stoichiometry of the surface up to the complete disappearance of the 2DEG. These results open a route for the nano-engineering of confined electronic states, the control of their metallic or insulating nature, and the tailoring of their microscopic symmetry, using UV illumination at different surfaces of anatase.
  • We report the existence of confined electronic states at the (110) and (111) surfaces of SrTiO3. Using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, we find that the corresponding Fermi surfaces, subband masses, and orbital ordering are different from the ones at the (001) surface of SrTiO3. This occurs because the crystallographic symmetries of the surface and sub-surface planes, and the electron effective masses along the confinement direction, influence the symmetry of the electronic structure and the orbital ordering of the t2g manifold. Remarkably, our analysis of the data also reveals that the carrier concentration and thickness are similar for all three surface orientations, despite their different polarities. The orientational tuning of the microscopic properties of two-dimensional electron states at the surface of SrTiO3 echoes the tailoring of macroscopic (e.g. transport) properties reported recently in LaAlO3/SrTiO3 (110) and (111) interfaces, and is promising for searching new types of 2D electronic states in correlated-electron oxides.
  • We study, using high-resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, the evolution of the electronic structure in URu2Si2 at the Gamma, Z and X high-symmetry points from the high-temperature Kondo-screened regime to the low-temperature `hidden-order' (HO) state. At all temperatures and symmetry points, we find structures resulting from the interaction between heavy and light bands, related to the Kondo lattice formation. At the X point, we directly measure a hybridization gap of 11 meV already open at temperatures above the ordered phase. Strikingly, we find that while the HO induces pronounced changes at Gamma and Z, the hybridization gap at X does not change, indicating that the hidden-order parameter is anisotropic. Furthermore, at the Gamma and Z points, we observe the opening of a gap in momentum in the HO state, and show that the associated electronic structure results from the hybridization of a light electron band with the Kondo-lattice bands characterizing the paramagnetic state.
  • Similar to silicon that is the basis of conventional electronics, strontium titanate (SrTiO3) is the bedrock of the emerging field of oxide electronics. SrTiO3 is the preferred template to create exotic two-dimensional (2D) phases of electron matter at oxide interfaces, exhibiting metal-insulator transitions, superconductivity, or large negative magnetoresistance. However, the physical nature of the electronic structure underlying these 2D electron gases (2DEGs) remains elusive, although its determination is crucial to understand their remarkable properties. Here we show, using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES), that there is a highly metallic universal 2DEG at the vacuum-cleaved surface of SrTiO3, independent of bulk carrier densities over more than seven decades, including the undoped insulating material. This 2DEG is confined within a region of ~5 unit cells with a sheet carrier density of ~0.35 electrons per a^2 (a is the cubic lattice parameter). We unveil a remarkable electronic structure consisting on multiple subbands of heavy and light electrons. The similarity of this 2DEG with those reported in SrTiO3-based heterostructures and field-effect transistors suggests that different forms of electron confinement at the surface of SrTiO3 lead to essentially the same 2DEG. Our discovery provides a model system for the study of the electronic structure of 2DEGs in SrTiO3-based devices, and a novel route to generate 2DEGs at surfaces of transition-metal oxides.
  • Solids with strong electron correlations generally develop exotic phases of electron matter at low temperatures. Among such systems, the heavy-fermion semi-metal URu2Si2 presents an enigmatic transition at To = 17.5 K to a `hidden order' state whose order parameter remains unknown after 23 years of intense research. Various experiments point to the reconstruction and partial gapping of the Fermi surface when the hidden-order establishes. However, up to now, the question of how this transition affects the electronic spectrum at the Fermi surface has not been directly addressed by a spectroscopic probe. Here we show, using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, that a band of heavy quasi-particles drops below the Fermi level upon the transition to the hidden-order state. Our data provide the first direct evidence of a large reorganization of the electronic structure across the Fermi surface of URu2Si2 occurring during this transition, and unveil a new kind of Fermi-surface instability in correlated electron systems
  • Angle-resolved photoemission measurements on the electron-doped cuprate Sm(1.85)Ce(0.15)CuO(4) evidence anisotropic dressing of charge-carriers due to many-body interactions. Most significantly, the scattering rate along the zone boundary saturates for binding energies larger than ~200 meV, while along the diagonal direction it increases nearly linearly with the binding energy in the energy range ~150-500 meV. These results indicate that many-body interactions along the diagonal direction are strong down to the bottom of the band, while along the zone-bounday they become very weak at energies above ~200 meV.
  • We study the electronic structures of two single layer superconducting cuprates, Tl$_2$Ba$_2$CuO$_{6+\delta}$ (Tl2201) and (Bi$_{1.35}$Pb$_{0.85}$)(Sr$_{1.47}$La$_{0.38}$)CuO$_{6+\delta}$ (Bi2201) which have very different maximum critical temperatures (90K and 35K respectively) using Angular Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy (ARPES). We are able to identify two main differences in their electronic properties. First, the shadow band that is present in double layer and low T$_{c,max}$ single layer cuprates is absent in Tl2201. Recent studies have linked the shadow band to structural distortions in the lattice and the absence of these in Tl2201 may be a contributing factor in its T$_{c,max}$.Second, Tl2201's Fermi surface (FS) contains long straight parallel regions near the anti-node, while in Bi2201 the anti-nodal region is much more rounded. Since the size of the superconducting gap is largest in the anti-nodal region, differences in the band dispersion at the anti-node may play a significant role in the pairing and therefore affect the maximum transition temperature.
  • We use angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) to study the momentum dependence of the superconducting gap in NdFeAsO1-xFx single crystals. We find that the Gamma hole pocket is fully gapped below the superconducting transition temperature. The value of the superconducting gap is 15 +- 1.5 meV and its anisotropy around the hole pocket is smaller than 20% of this value. This is consistent with an isotropic or anisotropic s-wave symmetry of the order parameter or exotic d-wave symmetry with nodes located off the Fermi surface sheets. This is a significant departure from the situation in the cuprates, pointing to possibility that the superconductivity in the iron arsenic based system arises from a different mechanism.
  • We use angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) to investigate the electronic properties of the newly discovered iron-arsenic superconductor, Ba(1-x)K(x)Fe2As2 and non-supercondcuting BaFe2As2. Our study indicates that the Fermi surface of the undoped, parent compound BaFe$_2$As$_2$ consists of hole pocket(s) at Gamma (0,0) and larger electron pocket(s) at X (1,0), in general agreement with full-potential linearized plane wave (FLAPW) calculations. Upon doping with potassium, the hole pocket expands and the electron pocket becomes smaller with its bottom approaching the chemical potential. Such an evolution of the Fermi surface is consistent with hole doping within a rigid band shift model. Our results also indicate that FLAPW calculation is a reasonable approach for modeling the electronic properties of both undoped and K-doped iron arsenites.
  • Recently, A. V. Boris and colleagues claimed to deduce a decrease of intraband spectral weight (SW), and a transfer of SW from intraband to inter-band frequencies, when optimally-doped or slightly underdoped cuprates become superconducting [A. V. Boris et al., Science 304, p. 708 (2004)]. We show that, while their data agree with others [H. J. A. Molegraaf et al., Science 295, p. 2239 (2002) ; A.F. Santander-Syro et al., Europhys.Lett 62, p. 568 (2003)], their analysis is flawed. They cannot disprove the results which yield a superconductivity-induced increase of intraband SW, and a transfer of SW from high to low frequencies, in underdoped or nearly optimally doped Bi-2212.