• The use of the spin Hall effect and its inverse to electrically detect and manipulate dynamic spin currents generated via ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) driven spin pumping has enabled the investigation of these dynamically injected currents across a wide variety of ferromagnetic materials. However, while this approach has proven to be an invaluable diagnostic for exploring the spin pumping process it requires strong spin-orbit coupling, thus substantially limiting the materials basis available for the detector/channel material (primarily Pt, W and Ta). Here, we report FMR driven spin pumping into a weak spin-orbit channel through the measurement of a spin accumulation voltage in a Si-based metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) heterostructure. This alternate experimental approach enables the investigation of dynamic spin pumping in a broad class of materials with weak spin-orbit coupling and long spin lifetime while providing additional information regarding the phase evolution of the injected spin ensemble via Hanle-based measurements of the effective spin lifetime.
  • We investigate the initial growth modes and the role of interfacial electrostatic interactions of EuO epitaxy on MgO(001) by reactive molecular beam epitaxy. A TiO2 interfacial layer is employed to produce high quality epitaxial growth of EuO on MgO(001) with a 45{\deg} in plane rotation. For comparison, direct deposition of EuO on MgO, without the TiO2 layer shows a much slower time evolution in producing a single crystal film. Conceptual arguments of electrostatic repulsion of like-ions are introduced to explain the increased EuO quality at the interface with the TiO2 layer. It is shown that ultrathin EuO films in the monolayer regime can be produced on the TiO2 surface by substrate-supplied oxidation and that such films have bulk-like magnetic properties.
  • The spin dependent properties of epitaxial Fe3O4 thin films on GaAs(001) are studied by the ferromagnetic proximity polarization (FPP) effect and magneto-optic Kerr effect (MOKE). Both FPP and MOKE show oscillations with respect to Fe3O4 film thickness, and the oscillations are large enough to induce repeated sign reversals. We attribute the oscillatory behavior to spin-polarized quantum well states forming in the Fe3O4 film. Quantum confinement of the t2g states near the Fermi level provides an explanation for the similar thickness dependences of the FPP and MOKE oscillations.
  • We demonstrate the epitaxial growth of EuO on GaAs by reactive molecular beam epitaxy. Thin films are grown in an adsorption-controlled regime with the aid of an MgO diffusion barrier. Despite the large lattice mismatch, it is shown that EuO grows well on MgO(001) with excellent magnetic properties. Epitaxy on GaAs is cube-on-cube and longitudinal magneto-optic Kerr effect measurements demonstrate a large Kerr rotation of 0.57{\deg}, a significant remanent magnetization, and a Curie temperature of 69 K.
  • We achieve tunneling spin injection from Co into single layer graphene (SLG) using TiO2 seeded MgO barriers. A non-local magnetoresistance ({\Delta}RNL) of 130 {\Omega} is observed at room temperature, which is the largest value observed in any material. Investigating {\Delta}RNL vs. SLG conductivity from the transparent to the tunneling contact regimes demonstrates the contrasting behaviors predicted by the drift-diffusion theory of spin transport. Furthermore, tunnel barriers reduce the contact-induced spin relaxation and are therefore important for future investigations of spin relaxation in graphene.
  • We achieve tunneling spin injection from Co into single layer graphene (SLG) using TiO2 seeded MgO barriers. A non-local magnetoresistance ({\Delta}RNL) of 130 {\Omega} is observed at room temperature, which is the largest value observed in any material. Investigating {\Delta}RNL vs. SLG conductivity from the transparent to the tunneling contact regimes demonstrates the contrasting behaviors predicted by the drift-diffusion theory of spin transport. Furthermore, tunnel barriers reduce the contact-induced spin relaxation and are therefore important for future investigations of spin relaxation in graphene.
  • The effects of surface chemical doping on spin transport in graphene are investigated by performing non-local measurements in ultrahigh vacuum while depositing gold adsorbates. We demonstrate manipulation of the gate-dependent non-local spin signal as a function of gold coverage. We discover that charged impurity scattering is not the dominant mechanism for spin relaxation in graphene, despite its importance for momentum scattering. Finally, unexpected enhancements of the spin lifetime illustrate the complex nature of spin relaxation in graphene.
  • We investigate the interlayer exchange coupling in Fe/MgO/Fe and Fe/MgO/Co systems with magnetic Fe nanoclusters embedded in the MgO spacer. Samples are grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) and utilize wedged MgO films to independently vary the film thickness and the position of the Fe nanoclusters. Depending on the position of the Fe nanoclusters, the bilinear coupling (J1) exhibits strong variations in magnitude and can even switch between antiferromagnetic and ferromagnetic. This effect is explained by the magnetic coupling between the ferromagnetic films and the magnetic nanoclusters. Interestingly, the coupling of Fe nanoclusters to a Co film is 160% stronger than their coupling to a Fe film (at MgO spacing of 0.56 nm). This is much greater than the coupling difference of 20% observed in the analogous thin film systems (i.e. Fe/MgO/Co vs. Fe/MgO/Fe), identifying an interesting nano-scaling effect related to the coupling between films and nanoclusters.