• The astrophysical r-process site where about half of the elements heavier than iron are produced has been a puzzle for several decades. Here we discuss the role of neutron star mergers (NSMs) in the light of the first direct detection of such an event in both gravitational (GW) and electromagnetic (EM) waves. We analyse bolometric and NIR lightcurves of the first detected double neutron star merger and compare them to nuclear reaction network-based macronova models. The slope of the bolometric lightcurve is consistent with the radioactive decay of neutron star ejecta with $Y_e \lesssim 0.3$ (but not larger), which provides strong evidence for an r-process origin of the electromagnetic emission. This rules out in particular "nickel winds" as major source of the emission. We find that the NIR lightcurves can be well fitted either with or without lanthanide-rich ejecta. Our limits on the ejecta mass together with estimated rates directly confirm earlier purely theoretical or indirect observational conclusions that double neutron star mergers are indeed a major site of cosmic nucleosynthesis. If the ejecta mass was {\em typical}, NSMs can easily produce {\em all} of the estimated Galactic r-process matter, and --depending on the real rate-- potentially even more. This could be a hint that the event ejected a particularly large amount of mass, maybe due to a substantial difference between the component masses. This would be compatible with the mass limits obtained from the GW-observation. The recent observations suggests that NSMs are responsible for a broad range of r-process nuclei and that they are at least a major, but likely the dominant r-process site in the Universe.
  • The colour evolution of reddened Type Ia supernovae can place strong constraints on the location of dust and help address the question of whether the observed extinction stems from the interstellar medium or from circumstellar material surrounding the progenitor. Here we analyse BV photometry of 48 reddened Type Ia supernovae from the literature and estimate the dust location from their $B-V$ colour evolution. We find a time-variable colour excess $E(B-V)$ for 15 supernovae in our sample and constrain dust to distances between 0.013 and 45 pc ($4\times10^{16}-10^{20}$ cm). For the remaining supernovae, we obtain a constant $E(B-V)$ evolution and place lower limits on the dust distance from the explosion. In all the 48 supernovae, the inferred dust location is compatible with an interstellar origin for the extinction. This is corroborated by the observation that supernovae with relatively nearby dust ($\lesssim$ 1 pc) are located close to the center of their host galaxy, in high-density dusty regions where interactions between the supernova radiation and interstellar clouds close by are likely to occur. For supernovae showing time-variable $E(B-V)$, we identify a potential preference for low $R_\mathrm{V}$ values, unusually strong sodium absorption and blue-shifted and time-variable absorption features. Within the interstellar framework, this brings evidence to a proposed scenario where cloud-cloud collisions induced by the supernova radiation pressure can shift the grain size distribution to smaller values and enhance the abundance of sodium in the gaseous phase.
  • We main goal of this paper is to test whether the NIR peak magnitudes of SNe Ia could be accurately estimated with only a single observation obtained close to maximum light, provided the time of B band maximum and the optical stretch parameter are known. We obtained multi-epoch UBVRI and single-epoch J and H photometric observations of 16 SNe Ia in the redshift range z=0.037-0.183, doubling the leverage of the current SN Ia NIR Hubble diagram and the number of SNe beyond redshift 0.04. This sample was analyzed together with 102 NIR and 458 optical light curves (LCs) of normal SNe Ia from the literature. The analysis of 45 well-sampled NIR LCs shows that a single template accurately describes them if its time axis is stretched with the optical stretch parameter. This allows us to estimate the NIR peak magnitudes even with one observation obtained within 10 days from B-band maximum. We find that the NIR Hubble residuals show weak correlation with DM_15 and E(B-V), and for the first time we report a possible dependence on the J_max-H_max color. The intrinsic NIR luminosity scatter of SNe Ia is estimated to be around 0.10 mag, which is smaller than what can be derived for a similarly heterogeneous sample at optical wavelengths. In conclusion, we find that SNe Ia are at least as good standard candles in the NIR as in the optical. We showed that it is feasible to extended the NIR SN Ia Hubble diagram to z=0.2 with very modest sampling of the NIR LCs, if complemented by well-sampled optical LCs. Our results suggest that the most efficient way to extend the NIR Hubble diagram to high redshift would be to obtain a single observation close to the NIR maximum. (abridged)
  • Strong lensing by massive galaxy clusters can provide magnification of the flux and even multiple images of the galaxies that lie behind them. This phenomenon facilitates observations of high-redshift supernovae (SNe), that would otherwise remain undetected. Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) detections are of particular interest because of their standard brightness, since they can be used to improve either cluster lensing models or cosmological parameter measurements. We present a ground-based, near-infrared search for lensed SNe behind the galaxy cluster Abell 370. Our survey was based on 15 epochs of J-band observations with the HAWK-I instrument on the Very Large Telescope (VLT). We use Hubble Space Telescope (HST) photometry to infer the global properties of the multiply-imaged galaxies. Using a recently published lensing model of Abell 370, we also present the predicted magnifications and time delays between the images. In our survey, we did not discover any live SNe from the 13 lensed galaxies with 47 multiple images behind Abell 370. This is consistent with the expectation of $0.09\pm0.02$ SNe calculated based on the measured star formation rate. We compare the expectations of discovering strongly lensed SNe in our survey and that performed with HST during the Hubble Frontier Fields (HFF) programme. We also show the expectations of search campaigns that can be conducted with future facilities, such as the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) or the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST). We show that the NIRCam instrument aboard the JWST will be sensitive to most SN multiple images in the strongly lensed galaxies and thus will be able to measure their time delays if observations are scheduled accordingly.
  • We performed a wide-area (2000 deg$^{2}$) g and I band experiment as part of a two month extension to the Intermediate Palomar Transient Factory. We discovered 36 extragalactic transients including iPTF17lf, a highly reddened local SN Ia, iPTF17bkj, a new member of the rare class of transitional Ibn/IIn supernovae, and iPTF17be, a candidate luminous blue variable outburst. We do not detect any luminous red novae and place an upper limit on their rate. We show that adding a slow-cadence I band component to upcoming surveys such as the Zwicky Transient Facility will improve the photometric selection of cool and dusty transients.
  • I. Andreoni, K. Ackley, J. Cooke, A. Acharyya, J. R. Allison, G. E. Anderson, M. C. B. Ashley, D. Baade, M. Bailes, K. Bannister, A. Beardsley, M. S. Bessell, F. Bian, P. A. Bland, M. Boer, T. Booler, A. Brandeker, I. S. Brown, D. Buckley, S.-W. Chang, D. M. Coward, S. Crawford, H.Crisp, B. Crosse, A. Cucchiara, M. Cupák, J. S. de Gois, A. Deller, H. A. R. Devillepoix, D. Dobie, E. Elmer, D. Emrich, W. Farah, T. J. Farrell, T. Franzen, B. M. Gaensler, D. K. Galloway, B. Gendre, T. Giblin, A. Goobar, J. Green, P. J. Hancock, B. A. D. Hartig, E. J. Howell, L. Horsley, A. Hotan, R. M. Howie, L. Hu, Y. Hu, C. W. James, S. Johnston, M. Johnston-Hollitt, D. L. Kaplan, M. Kasliwal, E. F. Keane, D. Kenney, A. Klotz, R. Lau, R. Laugier, E. Lenc, X. Li, E. Liang, C. Lidman, L. C. Luvaul, C. Lynch, B. Ma, D. Macpherson, J. Mao, D. E. McClelland, C. McCully, A. Möller, M. F. Morales, D. Morris, T. Murphy, K. Noysena, C. A. Onken, N. B. Orange, S. Oslowski, D. Pallot, J. Paxman, S. B. Potter, T. Pritchard, W. Raja, R. Ridden-Harper, E. Romero-Colmenero, E. M. Sadler, E. K. Sansom, R. A. Scalzo, B. P. Schmidt, S. M. Scott, N. Seghouani, Z. Shang, R. M. Shannon, L. Shao, M. M. Shara, R. Sharp, M. Sokolowski, J. Sollerman, J. Staff, K. Steele, T. Sun, N. B. Suntzeff, C. Tao, S. Tingay, M. C. Towner, P. Thierry, C. Trott, B. E. Tucker, P. Väisänen, V. Venkatraman Krishnan, M. Walker, L. Wang, X. Wang, R. Wayth, M. Whiting, A. Williams, T. Williams, C. Wolf, C. Wu, X. Wu, J. Yang, X. Yuan, H. Zhang, J. Zhou, H. Zovaro
    Oct. 16, 2017 astro-ph.SR, astro-ph.HE
    The discovery of the first electromagnetic counterpart to a gravitational wave signal has generated follow-up observations by over 50 facilities world-wide, ushering in the new era of multi-messenger astronomy. In this paper, we present follow-up observations of the gravitational wave event GW170817 and its electromagnetic counterpart SSS17a/DLT17ck (IAU label AT2017gfo) by 14 Australian telescopes and partner observatories as part of Australian-based and Australian-led research programs. We report early- to late-time multi-wavelength observations, including optical imaging and spectroscopy, mid-infrared imaging, radio imaging, and searches for fast radio bursts. Our optical spectra reveal that the transient source afterglow cooled from approximately 6400K to 2100K over a 7-day period and produced no significant optical emission lines. The spectral profiles, cooling rate, and photometric light curves are consistent with the expected outburst and subsequent processes of a binary neutron star merger. Star formation in the host galaxy probably ceased at least a Gyr ago, although there is evidence for a galaxy merger. Binary pulsars with short (100 Myr) decay times are therefore unlikely progenitors, but pulsars like PSR B1534+12 with its 2.7 Gyr coalescence time could produce such a merger. The displacement (about 2.2 kpc) of the binary star system from the centre of the main galaxy is not unusual for stars in the host galaxy or stars originating in the merging galaxy, and therefore any constraints on the kick velocity imparted to the progenitor are poor.
  • Merging neutron stars offer an exquisite laboratory for simultaneously studying strong-field gravity and matter in extreme environments. We establish the physical association of an electromagnetic counterpart EM170817 to gravitational waves (GW170817) detected from merging neutron stars. By synthesizing a panchromatic dataset, we demonstrate that merging neutron stars are a long-sought production site forging heavy elements by r-process nucleosynthesis. The weak gamma-rays seen in EM170817 are dissimilar to classical short gamma-ray bursts with ultra-relativistic jets. Instead, we suggest that breakout of a wide-angle, mildly-relativistic cocoon engulfing the jet elegantly explains the low-luminosity gamma-rays, the high-luminosity ultraviolet-optical-infrared and the delayed radio/X-ray emission. We posit that all merging neutron stars may lead to a wide-angle cocoon breakout; sometimes accompanied by a successful jet and sometimes a choked jet.
  • We present a new technique to infer dust locations towards reddened Type Ia supernovae and to help discriminate between an interstellar and a circumstellar origin for the observed extinction. Using Monte Carlo simulations, we show that the time-evolution of the light-curve shape and especially of the colour excess \ebv~places strong constraints on the distance between dust and the supernova. We apply our approach to two highly-reddened Type Ia supernovae for which dust distance estimates are available in the literature: SN 2006X and SN 2014J. For the former, we obtain a time-variable $E(B-V)$ and from this derive a distance of $27.5^{+9.0}_{-4.9}$ or $22.1^{+6.0}_{-3.8}$ pc depending on whether dust properties typical of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) or the Milky Way (MW) are used. For the latter, instead, we obtain a constant $E(B-V)$ consistent with dust at distances larger than 50 and 38 pc for LMC$-$ and MW$-$type dust, respectively. Values thus extracted are in excellent agreement with previous estimates for the two supernovae. Our findings suggest that dust responsible for the extinction towards these supernovae is likely to be located within interstellar clouds. We also discuss how other properties of reddened Type Ia supernovae $-$ such as their peculiar extinction and polarization behaviour and the detection of variable, blue-shifted sodium features in some of these events $-$ might be compatible with dust and gas at interstellar-scale distances.
  • Context. Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) can be used to address numerous questions in astrophysics and cosmology. Due to their well known spectral and photometric properties, SNe Ia are well suited to study gas and dust along the lines-of-sight to the explosions. For example, narrow Na I D and Ca II H&K absorption lines can be studied easily, because of the well-defined spectral continuum of SNe Ia around these features. Aims. We study the gas and dust along the line-of-sight to iPTF16abc, which occurred in an unusual location, in a tidal arm, 80 kpc from centre of the galaxy NGC 5221. Methods. Using a time-series of high-resolution spectra, we examine narrow Na I D and Ca II H&K absorption features for variations in time, which would be indicative for circumstellar (CS) matter. Furthermore, we take advantage of the well known photometric properties of SNe Ia to determine reddening due to dust along the line-of-sight. Results. From the lack of variations in Na I D and Ca II H&K, we determine that none of the detected absorption features originate from the CS medium of iPTF16abc. While the Na I D and Ca II H&K absorption is found to be optically thick, a negligible amount of reddening points to a small column of interstellar dust. Conclusions. We find that the gas along the line-of-sight to iPTF16abc is typical of what might be found in the interstellar medium (ISM) within a galaxy. It suggests that we are observing gas that has been tidally stripped during an interaction of NGC 5221 with one of its neighbouring galaxies in the past $\sim10^9$ years. In the future, the gas clouds could become the locations of star formation. On a longer time scale, the clouds might diffuse, enriching the circum-galactic medium (CGM) with metals. The gas profile along the line-of-sight should be useful for future studies of the dynamics of the galaxy group containing NGC 5221.
  • The light from distant supernovae (SNe) can be magnified through gravitational lensing when a foreground galaxy is located along the line of sight. This line-up allows for detailed studies of SNe at high redshift that otherwise would not be possible. Spectroscopic observations of lensed high-redshift Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) are of particular interest since they can be used to test for evolution of their intrinsic properties. The use of SNe Ia for probing the cosmic expansion history has proven to be an extremely powerful method for measuring cosmological parameters. However, if systematic redshift-dependent properties are found, their usefulness for future surveys could be challenged. We investigate whether the spectroscopic properties of the strongly lensed and very distant SN Ia PS1-10afx at $z=1.4$ deviates from the well-studied populations of normal SNe Ia at nearby or intermediate distance. We created median spectra from nearby and intermediate-redshift spectroscopically normal SNe Ia from the literature at -5 and +1 days from light-curve maximum. We then compared these median spectra to those of PS1-10afx. We do not find signs of spectral evolution in PS1-10afx. The observed deviation between PS1-10afx and the median templates are within what is found for SNe at low- and intermediate-redshift. There is a noticeable broad feature centred at $\rm \lambda\sim 3500$~\AA{}, which is present only to a lesser extent in individual low and intermediate redshift SN Ia spectra. From a comparison with a recently developed explosion model, we find this feature to be dominated by iron peak elements, in particular, singly ionized cobalt and chromium.
  • SN 2014J in M82 is the closest Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) in decades. The proximity allows for detailed studies of supernova physics and provides insights into the circumstellar and interstellar environment. In this work we analyze Spitzer mid-IR data of SN 2014J in the 3.6 and 4.5 {\mu}m wavelength range, together with several other nearby and well-studied SNe Ia. We compile the first composite mid-IR light-curve templates from our sample of SNe~Ia, spanning the range from before peak brightness well into the nebular phase. Our observations indicate that SNe Ia form a very homogeneous class of objects at these wavelengths. Using the low-reddening supernovae for comparison, we constrain possible thermal emission from circumstellar dust around the highly reddened SN 2014J. We also study SNe 2006X and 2007le, where the presence of matter in the circumstellar environment has been suggested. No significant mid-IR excess is detected, allowing us to place upper limits on the amount of pre-existing dust in the circumstellar environment. For SN 2014J, $M_{dust} < 10^{-5}$ M$_{\odot}$ within $r_{dust} \sim 10^{17}$ cm, which is insufficient to account for the observed extinction. Similar limits are obtained for SNe 2006X and 2007le.
  • We study the optical and near-infrared luminosities and detectability of radioactively powered electromagnetic transients ('macronovae') occuring in the aftermath of binary neutron star and neutron star black hole mergers. We explore the transients that result from the dynamic ejecta and those from different types of wind outflows. Based on full nuclear network simulations we calculate the resulting light curves in different wavelength bands. We scrutinize the robustness of the results by comparing a) two different nuclear reaction networks and b) two macronova models. We explore in particular how sensitive the results are to the production of alpha-decaying trans-lead nuclei. We compare two frequently used mass models: the Finite-Range Droplet Model (FRDM) and the nuclear mass model of Duflo and Zuker (DZ31). We find that the abundance of alpha-decaying trans-lead nuclei has a significant impact on the observability of the resulting macronovae. For example, the DZ31 model yields considerably larger abundances resulting in larger heating rates and thermalization efficiencies and therefore predicts substantially brighter macronova transients. We find that the dynamic ejecta from NSNS models can reach peak K-band magnitudes in excess of -15 while those from NSBH cases can reach beyond -16. Similar values can be reached by some of our wind models. Several of our models (both wind and dynamic ejecta) yield properties that are similar to the transient that was observed in the aftermath of the short GRB 130603B. We further explore the expected macronova detection frequencies for current and future instruments such as VISTA, ZTF and LSST.
  • In this paper, we report observations of a peculiar Type Ia supernova iPTF13asv (a.k.a., SN2013cv) from the onset of the explosion to months after its peak. The early-phase spectra of iPTF13asv show absence of iron absorption, indicating that synthesized iron elements are confined to low-velocity regions of the ejecta, which, in turn, implies a stratified ejecta structure along the line of sight. Our analysis of iPTF13asv's light curves and spectra shows that it is an intermediate case between normal and super-Chandrasekhar events. On the one hand, its light curve shape (B-band $\Delta m_{15}=1.03\pm0.01$) and overall spectral features resemble those of normal Type Ia supernovae. On the other hand, similar to super-Chandrasekhar events, it shows large peak optical and UV luminosity ($M_B=-19.84\,\rm{mag}$, $M_{uvm2}=-15.5\,\rm{mag}$) a relatively low but almost constant \ion{Si}{2} velocities of about $10,000\,\rm{km}\,\rm{s}^{-1}$, and persistent carbon absorption in the spectra. We estimate a $^{56}$Ni mass of $0.81^{+0.10}_{-0.18}M_\odot$ and a total ejecta mass of $1.59^{+0.45}_{-0.12}M_\odot$. The large ejecta mass of iPTF13asv and its stratified ejecta structure together seemingly favor a double-degenerate origin.
  • Temporal variability of narrow absorption lines in high-resolution spectra of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) is studied to search for circumstellar matter. Time series which resolve the profiles of absorption lines such as Na I D or Ca II H&K are expected to reveal variations due to photoionisation and subsequent recombination of the gases. The presence, composition, and geometry of circumstellar matter may hint at the elusive progenitor system of SNe Ia and could also affect the observed reddening law. To date, there are few known cases of time-varying Na I D absorption in SNe Ia, all of which occurred during relatively late phases of the supernova evolution. Photoionisation, however, is predicted to occur during the early phases of SNe Ia, when the supernova peaks in the ultraviolet. We therefore attempt to observe early-time absorption-line variations by obtaining high-resolution spectra of SNe before maximum light. We have obtained photometry and high-resolution spectroscopy of SNe Ia 2013gh and iPTF 13dge, to search for absorption- line variations. Furthermore, we study interstellar absorption features in relation to the observed photometric colours of the SNe. Results. Both SNe display deep Na I D and Ca II H&K absorption features. Furthermore, small but significant variations are detected in a feature of the Na I D profile of SN 2013gh. The variations are consistent with either geometric effects of rapidly moving or patchy gas clouds or photoionisation of Na I gas at R \approx 1019 cm from the explosion. Our analysis indicates that it is necessary to focus on early phases to detect photoionisation effects of gases in the circumstellar medium of SNe Ia. Different absorbers such as Na I and Ca II can be used to probe for matter at different distances from the SNe.
  • iPTF14atg, a subluminous peculiar Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) similar to SN 2002es, is the first SN Ia for which a strong UV flash was observed in the early-time light curves. This has been interpreted as evidence for a single-degenerate (SD) progenitor system where such a signal is expected from interactions between the SN ejecta and the non-degenerate companion star. Here, we compare synthetic observables of multi-dimensional state-of-the-art explosion models for different progenitor scenarios to the light curves and spectra of iPTF14atg. From our models, we have difficulties explaining the spectral evolution of iPTF14atg within the SD progenitor channel. In contrast, we find that a violent merger of two carbon-oxygen white dwarfs with 0.9 and 0.76 solar masses, respectively, provides an excellent match to the spectral evolution of iPTF14atg from 10d before to several weeks after maximum light. Our merger model does not naturally explain the initial UV flash of iPTF14atg. We discuss several possibilities like interactions of the SN ejecta with the circum-stellar medium and surface radioactivity from a He ignited merger that may be able to account for the early UV emission in violent merger models.
  • We present ultraviolet (UV) observations of six nearby Type~Ia supernovae (SNe~Ia) obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope, three of which were also observed in the near-IR (NIR) with Wide-Field Camera~3. UV observations with the Swift satellite, as well as ground-based optical and near-infrared data provide complementary information. The combined data-set covers the wavelength range $0.2$--$2~\mu$m. By also including archival data of SN 2014J, we analyse a sample spanning observed colour excesses up to $E(B-V)=1.4~$mag. We study the wavelength dependent extinction of each individual SN and find a diversity of reddening laws when characterised by the total-to-selective extinction $R_V$. In particular, we note that for the two SNe with $E(B-V)\gtrsim1~$mag, for which the colour excess is dominated by dust extinction, we find $R_V=1.4\pm0.1$ and $R_V=2.8\pm0.1$. Adding UV photometry reduces the uncertainty of fitted $R_V$ by $\sim50\,$% allowing us to also measure $R_V$ of individual low-extinction objects which point to a similar diversity, currently not accounted for in the analyses when SNe~Ia are used for studying the expansion history of the universe.
  • Type Ia supernovae are destructive explosions of carbon oxygen white dwarfs. Although they are used empirically to measure cosmological distances, the nature of their progenitors remains mysterious, One of the leading progenitor models, called the single degenerate channel, hypothesizes that a white dwarf accretes matter from a companion star and the resulting increase in its central pressure and temperature ignites thermonuclear explosion. Here we report observations of strong but declining ultraviolet emission from a Type Ia supernova within four days of its explosion. This emission is consistent with theoretical expectations of collision between material ejected by the supernova and a companion star, and therefore provides evidence that some Type Ia supernovae arise from the single degenerate channel.
  • We present near-infrared (NIR) time-series spectroscopy, as well as complementary ultraviolet (UV), optical, and NIR data, of the Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) iPTF13ebh, which was discovered within two days from the estimated time of explosion. The first NIR spectrum was taken merely 2.3 days after explosion and may be the earliest NIR spectrum yet obtained of a SN Ia. The most striking features in the spectrum are several NIR C I lines, and the C I {\lambda}1.0693 {\mu}m line is the strongest ever observed in a SN Ia. Interestingly, no strong optical C II counterparts were found, even though the optical spectroscopic time series began early and is densely-cadenced. Except at the very early epochs, within a few days from the time of explosion, we show that the strong NIR C I compared to the weaker optical C II appears to be general in SNe Ia. iPTF13ebh is a fast decliner with {\Delta}m15(B) = 1.79 $\pm$ 0.01, and its absolute magnitude obeys the linear part of the width-luminosity relation. It is therefore categorized as a "transitional" event, on the fast-declining end of normal SNe Ia as opposed to subluminous/91bg-like objects. iPTF13ebh shows NIR spectroscopic properties that are distinct from both the normal and subluminous/91bg-like classes, bridging the observed characteristics of the two classes. These NIR observations suggest composition and density of the inner core similar to that of 91bg-like events, and a deep reaching carbon burning layer not observed in slower declining SNe Ia. There is also a substantial difference between the explosion times inferred from the early-time light curve and the velocity evolution of the Si II {\lambda}0.6355 {\mu}m line, implying a long dark phase of ~ 4 days.
  • Left-over, ablated material from a possible non-degenerate companion can reveal itself after about one year in spectra of Type Ia SNe (SNe Ia). We have searched for such material in spectra of SN 2011fe (at 294 days after the explosion) and for SN 2014J (315 days past explosion). The observations are compared with numerical models simulating the expected line emission. The spectral lines sought for are H-alpha, [O I] 6300 and [Ca II] 7291,7324, and the expected width of these lines is about 1000 km/s. No signs of these lines can be traced in any of the two supernovae. When systematic uncertainties are included, the limits on hydrogen-rich ablated gas in SNe 2011fe and 2014J are 0.003 M_sun and 0.0085 M_sun, respectively, where the limit for SN 2014J is the second lowest ever, and the limit for SN 2011fe is a revision of a previous limit. Limits are also put on helium-rich ablated gas. These limits are used, in conjunction with other data, to argue that these supernovae can stem from double-degenerate systems, or from single-degenerate systems with a spun up/spun down super-Chandrasekhar white dwarf. For SN 2011fe, other types of hydrogen-rich donors can likely be ruled out, whereas for SN 2014J a main-sequence donor system with large intrinsic separation is still possible. Helium-rich donor systems cannot be ruled out for any of the two supernovae, but the expected short delay time for such progenitors makes this possibility less likely, especially for SN 2011fe. The broad [Ni II] 7378 emission in SN 2014J is redshifted by about +1300 km/s, as opposed to the known blueshift of roughly -1100 km/s for SN 2011fe. [Fe II] 7155 is also redshifted in SN 2014J. SN 2014J belongs to a minority of SNe Ia that both have a nebular redshift of [Fe II] 7155 and [Ni II] 7378, and a slow decline of the Si II 6355 absorption trough just after B-band maximum.
  • We forecast dark energy constraints that could be obtained from a new large sample of Type Ia supernovae where those at high redshift are acquired with the Euclid space mission. We simulate a three-prong SN survey: a z<0.35 nearby sample (8000 SNe), a 0.2<z<0.95 intermediate sample (8800 SNe), and a 0.75<z<1.55 high-z sample (1700 SNe). The nearby and intermediate surveys are assumed to be conducted from the ground, while the high-z is a joint ground- and space-based survey. This latter survey, the "Dark Energy Supernova Infra-Red Experiment" (DESIRE), is designed to fit within 6 months of Euclid observing time, with a dedicated observing program. We simulate the SN events as they would be observed in rolling-search mode by the various instruments, and derive the quality of expected cosmological constraints. We account for known systematic uncertainties, in particular calibration uncertainties including their contribution through the training of the supernova model used to fit the supernovae light curves. Using conservative assumptions and a 1-D geometric Planck prior, we find that the ensemble of surveys would yield competitive constraints: a constant equation of state parameter can be constrained to sigma(w)=0.022, and a Dark Energy Task Force figure of merit of 203 is found for a two-parameter equation of state. Our simulations thus indicate that Euclid can bring a significant contribution to a purely geometrical cosmology constraint by extending a high-quality SN Hubble diagram to z~1.5. We also present other science topics enabled by the DESIRE Euclid observations
  • We present cosmological constraints from a joint analysis of type Ia supernova (SN Ia) observations obtained by the SDSS-II and SNLS collaborations. The data set includes several low-redshift samples (z<0.1), all 3 seasons from the SDSS-II (0.05 < z < 0.4), and 3 years from SNLS (0.2 <z < 1) and totals \ntotc spectroscopically confirmed type Ia supernovae with high quality light curves. We have followed the methods and assumptions of the SNLS 3-year data analysis except for the following important improvements: 1) the addition of the full SDSS-II spectroscopically-confirmed SN Ia sample in both the training of the SALT2 light curve model and in the Hubble diagram analysis (\nsdssc SNe), 2) inter-calibration of the SNLS and SDSS surveys and reduced systematic uncertainties in the photometric calibration, performed blindly with respect to the cosmology analysis, and 3) a thorough investigation of systematic errors associated with the SALT2 modeling of SN Ia light-curves. We produce recalibrated SN Ia light-curves and associated distances for the SDSS-II and SNLS samples. The large SDSS-II sample provides an effective, independent, low-z anchor for the Hubble diagram and reduces the systematic error from calibration systematics in the low-z SN sample. For a flat LCDM cosmology we find Omega_m=0.295+-0.034 (stat+sys), a value consistent with the most recent CMB measurement from the Planck and WMAP experiments. Our result is 1.8sigma (stat+sys) different than the previously published result of SNLS 3-year data. The change is due primarily to improvements in the SNLS photometric calibration. When combined with CMB constraints, we measure a constant dark-energy equation of state parameter w=-1.018+-0.057 (stat+sys) for a flat universe. Adding BAO distance measurements gives similar constraints: w=-1.027+-0.055.
  • The wavelength-dependence of the extinction of Type Ia SN2014J in the nearby galaxy M82 has been measured using UV to near-IR photometry obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope, the Nordic Optical Telescope, and the Mount Abu Infrared Telescope. This is the first time that the reddening of a SN Ia is characterized over the full wavelength range of $0.2$-$2$ microns. A total-to-selective extinction, $R_V\geq3.1$, is ruled out with high significance. The best fit at maximum using a Galactic type extinction law yields $R_V = 1.4\pm0.1$. The observed reddening of SN2014J is also compatible with a power-law extinction, $A_{\lambda}/A_V = \left( {\lambda}/ {\lambda_V} \right)^{p}$ as expected from multiple scattering of light, with $p=-2.1\pm0.1$. After correction for differences in reddening, SN2014J appears to be very similar to SN2011fe over the 14 broad-band filter light curves used in our study.
  • Using three magnified Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) detected behind CLASH clusters, we perform a first pilot study to see whether standardizable candles can be used to calibrate cluster mass maps created from strong lensing observations. Such calibrations will be crucial when next generation HST cluster surveys (e.g. FRONTIER) provide magnification maps that will, in turn, form the basis for the exploration of the high redshift Universe. We classify SNe using combined photometric and spectroscopic observations, finding two of the three to be clearly of type SN Ia and the third probable. The SNe exhibit significant amplification, up to a factor of 1.7 at $\sim5\sigma$ significance (SN-L2). We conducted this as a blind study to avoid fine tuning of parameters, finding a mean amplification difference between SNe and the cluster lensing models of $0.09 \pm 0.09^{stat} \pm 0.05^{sys}$ mag. This impressive agreement suggests no tension between cluster mass models and high redshift standardized SNe Ia. However, the measured statistical dispersion of $\sigma_{\mu}=0.21$ mag appeared large compared to the dispersion expected based on statistical uncertainties ($0.14$). Further work with the supernova and cluster lensing models, post unblinding, reduced the measured dispersion to $\sigma_{\mu}=0.12$. An explicit choice should thus be made as to whether SNe are used unblinded to improve the model, or blinded to test the model. As the lensed SN samples grow larger, this technique will allow improved constraints on assumptions regarding e.g. the structure of the dark matter halo.
  • We report the discovery of a redshift 1.71 supernova in the GOODS North field. The Hubble Space Telescope (HST) ACS spectrum has almost negligible contamination from the host or neighboring galaxies. Although the rest frame sampled range is too blue to include any Si ii line, a principal component analysis allows us to confirm it as a Type Ia supernova with 92% confidence. A recent serendipitous archival HST WFC3 grism spectrum contributed a key element of the confirmation by giving a host-galaxy redshift of 1.713 +/- 0.007. In addition to being the most distant SN Ia with spectroscopic confirmation, this is the most distant Ia with a precision color measurement. We present the ACS WFC and NICMOS 2 photometry and ACS and WFC3 spectroscopy. Our derived supernova distance is in agreement with the prediction of LambdaCDM.
  • We study SN 2006oz, a newly-recognized member of the class of H-poor, super-luminous supernovae. We present multi-color light curves from the SDSS-II SN Survey, that cover the rise time, as well as an optical spectrum that shows that the explosion occurred at z~0.376. We fitted black body functions to estimate the temperature and radius evolution of the photosphere and used the parametrized code SYNOW to model the spectrum. We constructed a bolometric light curve and compared it with explosion models. The very early light curves show a dip in the g- and r-bands and a possible initial cooling phase in the u-band before rising to maximum light. The bolometric light curve shows a precursor plateau with a duration of 6-10 days in the rest-frame. A lower limit of M_u < -21.5 can be placed on the absolute peak luminosity of the SN, while the rise time is constrained to be at least 29 days. During our observations, the emitting sphere doubled its radius to 2x10^15 cm, while the temperature remained hot at 15000 K. As for other similar SNe, the spectrum is best modeled with elements including O II and Mg II, while we tentatively suggest that Fe III might be present. We suggest that the precursor plateau might be related to a recombination wave in a circumstellar medium (CSM) and discuss whether this is a common property of all similar explosions. The subsequent rise can be equally well described by input from a magnetar or by ejecta-CSM interaction, but the models are not well constrained owing to the lack of post-maximum observations, and CSM interaction has difficulties accounting for the precursor plateau self-consistently. Radioactive decay is less likely to be the mechanism that powers the luminosity. The host galaxy, detected in deep imaging with the 10 m GTC, is a moderately young and star-forming, but not a starburst, galaxy. It has an absolute magnitude of M_g = -16.9.