• Plasma turbulence is studied via direct numerical simulations in a two-dimensional spatial geometry. Using a hybrid Vlasov-Maxwell model, we investigate the possibility of a velocity-space cascade. A novel theory of space plasma turbulence has been recently proposed by Servidio {\it et al.} [PRL, {\bf 119}, 205101 (2017)], supported by a three-dimensional Hermite decomposition applied to spacecraft measurements, showing that velocity space fluctuations of the ion velocity distribution follow a broad-band, power-law Hermite spectrum $P(m)$, where $m$ is the Hermite index. We numerically explore these mechanisms in a more magnetized regime. We find that (1) the plasma reveals spectral anisotropy in velocity space, due to the presence of an external magnetic field (analogous to spatial anisotropy of fluid and plasma turbulence); (2) the distribution of energy follows the prediction $P(m)\sim m^{-2}$, proposed in the above theoretical-observational work; and (3) the velocity-space activity is intermittent in space, being enhanced close to coherent structures such as the reconnecting current sheets produced by turbulence. These results may be relevant to the nonlinear dynamics weakly-collisional plasma in a wide variety of circumstances.
  • In this paper a procedure for the dynamic identification of damage in spatial Timoshenko arches is presented. The proposed approach is based on the calculation of an arbitrary number of exact eigen-properties of a damaged spatial arch by means of the Wittrick and Williams algorithm. The proposed damage model considers a reduction of the volume in a part of the arch, and is therefore suitable, differently than what is commonly proposed in the main part of the dedicated literature, not only for concentrated cracks but also for diffused damaged zones which may involve a loss of mass. Different damage scenarios can be taken into account with variable location, intensity and extension of the damage as well as number of damaged segments. An optimization procedure, aiming at identifying which damage configuration minimizes the difference between its eigen-properties and a set of measured modal quantities for the structure, is implemented making use of genetic algorithms. In this context, an initial random population of chromosomes, representing different damage distributions along the arch, is forced to evolve towards the fittest solution. Several applications with different, single or multiple, damaged zones and boundary conditions confirm the validity and the applicability of the proposed procedure even in presence of instrumental errors on the measured data.
  • Energetic particles with energies from tens of keV to a few hundreds keV are frequently observed in the Earth's magnetotail. Here we study, by means of a test particle numerical simulation, the acceleration of different ion species (H$^{+}$, He$^{+}$, He$^{++}$, and O$^{n+}$ with $n=1$--$6$) in the presence of transient electromagnetic perturbations. All the considered ions develop power-law tails at high energies, except for O$^+$ ions. This is strongly correlated to the time that the particle spend in the current sheet. Ion acceleration is found to be proportional to the charge state, while it grows in a weaker way with the ion mass. We find that O$^{5+/6+}$ can reach energies higher than $500$ kev. These results may explain the strong oxygen acceleration observed in the magnetotail.
  • This paper studies the inverse problem related to the identification of the flexural stiffness of an Euler Bernoulli beam in order to reconstruct its profile starting from available response data. The proposed identification procedure makes use of energy measurements and is based on the application of a closed form solution for the static displacements of multi-stepped beams. This solution allows to easily calculate the energy related to beams modeled with arbitrary multi-step shapes subjected to a transversal roving force, and to compare it with the correspondent data obtained through direct measurements on real beams. The optimal solution which minimizes the difference between measured and calculated data is then sought by means of genetic algorithms. In the paper several different stepped beams are investigated showing that the proposed procedure allows in many cases to identify the exact beam profile. However it is shown that in some other cases different multi-step profiles may correspond to very similar static responses, and therefore to comparable minima in the optimization problem, thus complicating the profile identification problem.
  • This paper presents an automatic approach for the evaluation of the plastic load and failure modes of planar frames. The method is based on the generation of elementary collapse mechanisms and on their linear combination aimed at minimizing the collapse load factor. The minimization procedure is efficiently performed by means of genetic algorithms which allow to compute an approximate collapse load factor, and the correspondent failure mode, with sufficient accuracy in a very short computing time. A user-friendly original software in the agent-based programming language Netlogo, here employed for the first time with structural engineering purposes, has been developed showing its great versatility and advantages. Many applications have been performed both with reference to the classical plastic analysis approach, in which all the loads increase proportionally, and with a seismic point of view considering a system of horizontal forces whose magnitude increases while the vertical loads are assumed to be constant. In this latter case a parametric study has been performed aiming at evaluating the influence of some geometric, mechanical and load distribution parameters on the ultimate collapse load of planar frames.
  • Using high resolution Cluster satellite observations, we show that the turbulent solar wind is populated by magnetic discontinuities at different scales, going from proton down to electron scales. The structure of these layers resembles the Harris equilibrium profile in plasmas. Using a multi-dimensional intermittency technique, we show that these structures are connected through the scales. Supported by numerical simulations of magnetic reconnection, we show that observations are consistent with a scenario where many current layers develop in turbulence, and where the outflow of these reconnection events are characterized by complex sub-proton networks of secondary islands, in a self-similar way. The present work establishes that the picture of "reconnection in turbulence" and "turbulent reconnection", separately invoked as ubiquitous, coexist in space plasmas.
  • A statistical relationship between magnetic reconnection, current sheets and intermittent turbulence in the solar wind is reported for the first time using in-situ measurements from the Wind spacecraft at 1 AU. We identify intermittency as non-Gaussian fluctuations in increments of the magnetic field vector, $\mathbf{B}$, that are spatially and temporally non-uniform. The reconnection events and current sheets are found to be concentrated in intervals of intermittent turbulence, identified using the partial variance of increments method: within the most non-Gaussian 1% of fluctuations in $\mathbf{B}$, we find 87%-92% of reconnection exhausts and $\sim$9% of current sheets. Also, the likelihood that an identified current sheet will also correspond to a reconnection exhaust increases dramatically as the least intermittent fluctuations are removed from the dataset. Hence, the turbulent solar wind contains a hierarchy of intermittent magnetic field structures that are increasingly linked to current sheets, which in turn are progressively more likely to correspond to sites of magnetic reconnection. These results could have far reaching implications for laboratory and astrophysical plasmas where turbulence and magnetic reconnection are ubiquitous.
  • The acceleration of charged particles is relevant to the solar corona over a broad range of scales and energies. High-energy particles are usually detected in concomitance with large energy release events like solar eruptions and flares, nevertheless acceleration can occur at smaller scales, characterized by dynamical activity near current sheets. To gain insight into the complex scenario of coronal charged particle acceleration, we investigate the properties of acceleration with a test-particle approach using three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) models. These are obtained from direct solutions of the reduced MHD equations, well suited for a plasma embedded in a strong axial magnetic field, relevant to the inner heliosphere. A multi-box, multi-scale technique is used to solve the equations of motion for protons. This method allows us to resolve an extended range of scales present in the system, namely from the ion inertial scale of the order of a meter up to macroscopic scales of the order of $10\,$km ($1/100$th of the outer scale of the system). This new technique is useful to identify the mechanisms that, acting at different scales, are responsible for acceleration to high energies of a small fraction of the particles in the coronal plasma. We report results that describe acceleration at different stages over a broad range of time, length and energy scales.
  • The fundamental assumptions of the adiabatic theory do not apply in presence of sharp field gradients as well as in presence of well developed magnetohydrodynamic turbulence. For this reason in such conditions the magnetic moment $\mu$ is no longer expected to be constant. This can influence particle acceleration and have considerable implications in many astrophysical problems. Starting with the resonant interaction between ions and a single parallel propagating electromagnetic wave, we derive expressions for the magnetic moment trapping width $\Delta \mu$ (defined as the half peak-to-peak difference in the particle magnetic moment) and the bounce frequency $\omega_b$. We perform test-particle simulations to investigate magnetic moment behavior when resonances overlapping occurs and during the interaction of a ring-beam particle distribution with a broad-band slab spectrum. We find that magnetic moment dynamics is strictly related to pitch angle $\alpha$ for a low level of magnetic fluctuation, $\delta B/B_0 = (10^{-3}, \, 10^{-2})$, where $B_0$ is the constant and uniform background magnetic field. Stochasticity arises for intermediate fluctuation values and its effect on pitch angle is the isotropization of the distribution function $f(\alpha)$. This is a transient regime during which magnetic moment distribution $f(\mu)$ exhibits a characteristic one-sided long tail and starts to be influenced by the onset of spatial parallel diffusion, i.e., the variance $<(\Delta z)^2 >$ grows linearly in time as in normal diffusion. With strong fluctuations $f(\alpha)$ isotropizes completely, spatial diffusion sets in and $f(\mu)$ behavior is closely related to the sampling of the varying magnetic field associated with that spatial diffusion.
  • We observe charge-order fluctuations in the quasi-two-dimensional organic superconductor $\beta^{\prime\prime}$-(BEDT-TTF)2 SF5 CH2 CF2 SO3 both by means of vibrational spectroscopy, locally probing the fluctuating charge order, and investigating the in-plane dynamical response by infrared reflectance spectroscopy. The decrease of effective electronic interaction in an isostructural metal suppresses both charge-order fluctuations and superconductivity, pointing on their interplay. We compare the results of our experiments with calculations on the extended Hubbard model.
  • Cluster observations in the near-Earth magnetotail have shown that sometimes the current sheet is bifurcated, i.e. it is divided in two layers. The influence of magnetic turbulence on ion motion in this region is investigated by numerical simulation, taking into account the presence of both protons and oxygen ions. The magnetotail current sheet is modeled as a magnetic field reversal with a normal magnetic field component $B_n$, plus a three-dimensional spectrum of magnetic fluctuations $\delta {\bf B}$, which represents the observed magnetic turbulence. The dawn-dusk electric field E$_y$ is also included. A test particle simulation is performed using different values of $\delta {\bf B}$, E$_y$ and injecting two different species of particles, O$^+$ ions and protons. O$^+$ ions can support the formation of a double current layer both in the absence and for large values of magnetic fluctuations ($\delta B/B_0 = 0.0$ and $\delta B/B_0 \geq 0.4$, where B$_0$ is the constant magnetic field in the magnetospheric lobes).
  • One-electron self-energy in the $t$-$J$ model was computed using a recently developed large-$N$ method based on the path integral representation for Hubbard operators. One of the main features of the self-energy is its strong asymmetry with respect to the Fermi level, showing the spectra mostly concentrated at high negative energy. This asymmetry is responsible for the existence of incoherent structures at high negative energy in the spectral functions. It is shown that dynamical non-double-occupancy excitations are relevant for the behavior of the self-energy. It is difficult to understand the asymmetry shown by the self-energy from weak coupling treatments. We compare our results with others in recent literature. Finally, the possible relevance of our results for the recent high energy features observed in photoemission experiments is discussed.
  • We study the t-J-$V$ model beyond mean field level at finite doping on the triangular lattice. The Coulomb repulsion $V$ between nearest neighbors brings the system to a charge ordered state for $V$ larger than a critical value $V_c$. One-particle spectral properties as self-energy, spectral functions and the quasiparticle weight are studied near and far from the charge ordered phase. When the system approaches the charge ordered state, charge fluctuations become soft and they strongly influence the system leading to incoherent one-particle excitations. Possible implications for cobaltates are given.
  • The infrared spectra of the quasi-two-dimensional organic conductors $\alpha$-(BEDT-TTF)$_2$$M$Hg(SCN)$_4$ ($M$ = NH$_4$, Rb, Tl) were measured in the range from 50 to 7000 \cm down to low temperatures in order to explore the influence of electronic correlations in quarter-filled metals. The interpretation of electronic spectra was confirmed by measurements of pressure dependant reflectance of $\alpha$-(BEDT-TTF)$_2$KHg(SCN)$_4$ at T=300 K. The signatures of charge order fluctuations become more pronounced when going from the NH$_4$ salt to Rb and further to Tl compounds. On reducing the temperature, the metallic character of the optical response in the NH$_4$ and Rb salts increases, and the effective mass diminishes. For the Tl compound, clear signatures of charge order are found albeit the metallic properties still dominate. From the temperature dependence of the electronic scattering rate the crossover temperature is estimated below which the coherent charge-carriers response sets in. The observations are in excellent agreement with recent theoretical predictions for a quarter-filled metallic system close to charge order.
  • Several experimental and theoretical studies in cobaltates suggest the proximity of the system to charge ordering (CO). We show, qualitatively, in the frame of a $t-V$ model coupled to phonons that optical phonon modes at the $K$ and $M$ points of the Brillouin zone, which involves only $O$-ions displacement around a $Co$-ion, are good candidates to display anomalies due to the CO proximity. If by increasing of $H_2O$ content the system is pushed closer to CO, the mentioned phonon modes should show softening and broadening.
  • We consider possible routes to superconductivity in hydrated cobaltates Na_xCoO_2.yH_2O on the basis of the t-J-V model plus phonons on the triangular lattice. We studied the stability conditions for the homogeneous Fermi liquid (HFL) phase against different broken symmetry phases. Besides the sqrt(3)xsqrt(3)-CDW phase, triggered by the nearest-neighbour Coulomb interaction V, we have found that the HFL is unstable, at very low doping, against a bond-ordered phase due to J. We also discuss the occurrence of phase separation at low doping and V. The interplay between the electron-phonon interaction and correlations near the sqrt(3)xsqrt(3)-CDW leads to superconductivity in the unconventional next-nearest neighbour f-wave (NNN-f) channel with a dome shape for Tc around x ~ 0.35, and with values of a few Kelvin as seen in experiments. Near the bond-ordered phase at low doping we found tendencies to superconductivity with d-wave symmetry for finite J and x<0.15. Contact with experiments is given along the paper.
  • Non-Fermi liquid behavior is shown to occur in two-dimensional metals which are close to a charge ordering transition driven by the Coulomb repulsion. A linear temperature dependence of the scattering rate together with an increase of the electron effective mass occur above T*, a temperature scale much smaller than the Fermi temperature. It is shown that the anomalous temperature dependence of the optical conductivity of the quasi-two-dimensional organic metal alpha-(BEDT-TTF)2MHg(SCN)4, with M=NH4 and Rb, above T*=50-100 K, agrees qualitatively with our predictions for the electronic properties of nearly charge ordered two-dimensional metals.
  • Using a recently developed perturbative approach, which considers Hubbard operators as fundamental excitations, we have performed electronic self-energy and spectral function calculations for the $t-J$ model on the square lattice. We have found that the spectral functions along the Fermi surface are isotropic, even close to the critical doping where the $d$-density wave phase takes place. Fermi liquid behavior with scattering rate $\sim \omega^2$ and a finite quasiparticle weight $Z$ was obtained. $Z$ decreases with decreasing doping taking low values for low doping. Results are compared with other ones, analytical and numerical like slave-boson and Lanczos diagonalization finding agreement. We discuss our results in the light of recent $ARPES$ experiments in cuprates.
  • The excitation spectrum of the t-J model is studied on a square lattice in the large $N$ limit in a doping range where a $d$-$density$-$wave$ (DDW) forms below a transition temperature $T^\star$. Characteristic features of the DDW ground state are circulating currents which fluctuate above and condense into a staggered flux state below $T^\star$ and density fluctuations where the electron and the hole are localized at different sites. General expressions for the density response are given both above and below $T^\star$ and applied to Raman, X-ray, and neutron scattering. Numerical results show that the density response is mainly collective in nature consisting of broad, dispersive structures which transform into well-defined peaks mainly at small momentum transfers. One way to detect these excitations is by inelastic neutron scattering at small momentum transfers where the cross section (typically a few per cents of that for spin scattering) is substantially enhanced, exhibits a strong dependence on the direction of the transferred momentum and a well-pronounced peak somewhat below twice the DDW gap. Scattering from the DDW-induced Bragg peak is found to be weaker by two orders of magnitude compared with the momentum-integrated inelastic part.
  • We interpret the optical spectra of $\alpha$-(BEDT-TTF)$_2M$Hg(SCN)$_4$ (M=NH$_4$ and Rb) in terms of a 1/4 filled metallic system close to charge ordering and show that in the conductivity spectra of these compounds a fraction of the spectral weight is shifted from the Drude-peak to higher frequencies due to strong electronic correlations. Analyzing the temperature dependence of the electronic parameters, we distinguish between different aspects of the influence of electronic correlations on optical properties. We conclude, that the correlation effects are slightly weaker in the NH$_4$ compound compared to the Rb one.
  • We propose that unconventional superconductivity in hydrated sodium cobaltate $Na_xCoO_2$ results from an interplay of electronic correlations and electron-phonon interactions. On the basis of the $t-V$ model plus phonons we found evidences for a) unconventional superconductivity, b) realistic values of $T_c$ and c) the dome shape existing near $x \sim 0.35$. This picture is obtained for $V$ close to the critical Coulomb repulsion $V_c$ which separates the uniform Fermi liquid from $\sqrt{3} \times \sqrt{3}$ CDW ordered phase.
  • The optimally doped and underdoped region of the $t-J$ model at large N (N is the number of spin components) is governed by the competition of d-wave superconductivity (SC) and a d Charge-Density Wave (d-CDW).The partial destruction of the Fermi surface by the d-CDW and the resulting density of states are discussed. Furthermore, c-axis conductances for incoherent and coherent tunneling are calculated, considering both an isotropic and an anisotropic in-plane momentum dependence of the hopping matrix element between the planes. The influence of self-energy effects on the conductances is also considered using a model where the electrons interact with a dispersionless, low-lying branch of bosons. We show that available tunneling spectra from break-junctions are best explained by assuming that they result from incoherent tunneling with a strongly anisotropic hopping matrix element of the form suggested by band structure calculations. The conductance spectra are then characterized by one single peak which evolves continuously from the superconducting to the d-CDW state with decreasing doping. The intrinsic c-axis tunneling spectra are, on the other hand, best explained by coherent tunneling. Calculated spectra show at low temperatures two peaks due to SC and d-CDW. With increasing temperature the BCS-like peak moves to zero voltage and vanishes at T$_c$,exactly as in experiment.Our results thus can explain why break junction and intrinsic tunneling spectra are different from each other. Moreover, they support a scenario of two competing order parameters in the underdoped region of high-T$_c$ superconductors.
  • The polarized reflectivity of $\beta^{\prime\prime}$-(BEDO-TTF)$_5$[CsHg(SCN)$_4$]$_2$ is studied in the infrared range between 60 cm-1 and 6000 cm-1 from room temperature down to 10 K. Already at T=300 K a pseudogap in the optical conductivity is present of about 300 cm-1; the corresponding maximum in the spectrum shifts to lower frequencies as the temperature decreases. In contrast to quarter-filled BEDT-TTF-based conductors of the $\beta^{\prime\prime}$-phase a robust Drude component in the conductivity spectra is observed which we ascribe to the larger fraction of charge carriers associated with the 1/5-filling of the conduction band. This observation is corroborated by exact diagonalization calculations on an extended Hubbard model on a square lattice for different fillings. A broad band at 4000 cm-1 which appears for the electric field polarized parallel to the stacks of the BEDO-TTF molecules is associated to structural modulations in the stacks; these modulations lead to a rise of the dc and microwave resistivity in 100 to 30 K temperature range.
  • The competition of superconductivity and a d charge-density wave (CDW) is studied in the t-J model as a function of temperature at large N where N is the number of spin components. Applying the theory to electronic Raman scattering the temperature dependence of the $B_{1g}$ and the $A_{1g}$ spectra are discussed for a slightly underdoped case.
  • Electronic Raman scattering in high-T$_c$ superconductors is studied within the t-J model. It is shown that the A$_{1g}$ and B$_{1g}$ spectra are dominated by amplitude fluctuations of the superconducting and the d-wave CDW order parameters, respectively. The B$_{2g}$ spectrum contains no collective effects and its broad peak reflects vaguely the doping dependence of T$_c$, similarly to the pronounced peak in the A$_{1g}$ spectrum. The agreement of our theory with the experiment supports the picture of two different, competing order parameters in the underdoped regime of high-T$_c$ superconductors.