• Photons, electrons, and their interplay are at the heart of photonic devices and modern instruments for ultrafast science [1-10]. Nowadays, electron beams of the highest intensity and brightness are created by photoemission with short laser pulses, and then accelerated and manipulated using GHz radiofrequency electromagnetic fields. The electron beams are utilized to directly map photoinduced dynamics with ultrafast electron scattering techniques, or further engaged for coherent radiation production at up to hard X-ray wavelengths [11-13]. The push towards improved timing precision between the electron beams and pump optical pulses though, has been stalled at the few tens of femtosecond level, due to technical challenges with synchronizing the high power rf fields with optical sources. Here, we demonstrate attosecond electron metrology using laser-generated single-cycle THz radiation, which is intrinsically phase locked to the optical drive pulses, to manipulate multi-MeV relativistic electron beams. Control and single-shot characterization of bright electron beams at this unprecedented level open up many new opportunities for atomic visualization.
  • Instruments to visualize transient structural changes of inhomogeneous materials on the nanometer scale with atomic spatial and temporal resolution are demanded to advance materials science, bioscience, and fusion sciences. One such technique is femtosecond electron microdiffraction, in which a short pulse of electrons with femtosecond-scale duration is focused into a micron-scale spot and used to obtain diffraction images to resolve ultrafast structural dynamics over localized crystalline domain. In this letter, we report the experimental demonstration of time-resolved mega-electron-volt electron microdiffraction which achieves a 5 {\mu}m root-mean-square (rms) beam size on the sample and a 100 fs rms temporal resolution. Using pulses of 10k electrons at 4.2 MeV energy with a normalized emittance 3 nm-rad, we obtained high quality diffraction from a single 10 {\mu}m paraffin (C_44 H_90) crystal. The phonon softening mode in optical-pumped polycrystalline Bi was also time-resolved, demonstrating the temporal resolution limits of our instrument design. This new characterization capability will open many research opportunities in material and biological sciences.
  • Vanadium dioxide, an archetypal correlated-electron material, undergoes an insulator-metal transition near room temperature that exhibits electron-correlation-driven and structurally-driven physics. Using ultrafast optical spectroscopy and x-ray scattering we show that these processes can be disentangled in the time domain. Specifically, following intense sub-picosecond electric-field excitation, a partial collapse of the insulating gap occurs within the first ps. Subsequently, this electronic reconfiguration initiates a change in lattice symmetry taking place on a slower timescale. We identify the kinetic energy increase of electrons tunneling in the strong electric field as the driving force, illustrating a novel method to control electronic interactions in correlated materials on an ultrafast timescale.
  • We use ultrafast x-ray and electron diffraction to disentangle spin-lattice coupling of granular FePt in the time domain. The reduced dimensionality of single-crystalline FePt nanoparticles leads to strong coupling of magnetic order and a highly anisotropic three-dimensional lattice motion characterized by a- and b-axis expansion and c-axis contraction. The resulting increase of the FePt lattice tetragonality, the key quantity determining the energy barrier between opposite FePt magnetization orientations, persists for tens of picoseconds. These results suggest a novel approach to laser-assisted magnetic switching in future data storage applications.
  • We use ultrafast electron diffraction to detect the temporal evolution of phonon populations in femtosecond laser-excited ultrathin single-crystalline gold films. From the time-dependence of the Debye-Waller factor we extract a 4.7 ps time-constant for the increase in mean-square atomic displacements. We show from the increase of the diffuse scattering intensity that the population of phonon modes near the X and K points in the Au fcc Brillouin zone grows with timescales of 2.3 and 2.9 ps, respectively, faster than the Debye-Waller average. We find that thermalization continues within the initially non-equilibrium phonon distribution after 10 ps. The observed momentum dependent timescale of phonon populations is in contrast to what is usually predicted in a two-temperature model.
  • We use femtosecond time-resolved hard x-ray scattering to detect coherent acoustic phonons excited during ultrafast laser demagnetization of bcc Fe films. We determine the lattice strain propagating through the film through analysis of the oscillations in the x-ray scattering signal as a function of momentum transfer. The width of the strain wavefront is ~100 fs, similar to demagnetization timescales. First-principles calculations show that the high-frequency Fourier components of the strain, which give rise to the sharp wavefront, could in part originate from non-thermal dynamics of the lattice not considered in the two-temperature model.
  • We use polarization- and temperature-dependent x-ray absorption spectroscopy, in combination with photoelectron microscopy, x-ray diffraction and electronic transport measurements, to study the driving force behind the insulator-metal transition in VO2. We show that both the collapse of the insulating gap and the concomitant change in crystal symmetry in homogeneously strained single-crystalline VO2 films are preceded by the purely-electronic softening of Coulomb correlations within V-V singlet dimers. This process starts 7 K (+/- 0.3 K) below the transition temperature, as conventionally defined by electronic transport and x-ray diffraction measurements, and sets the energy scale for driving the near-room-temperature insulator-metal transition in this technologically-promising material.