• Electronic states on the Bi/InAs(110)-(2$\times$1) surface and its spin-polarized structure are revealed by angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (ARPES), spin-resolved ARPES, and density-functional-theory calculation. The surface state showed quasi-one-dimensional (Q1D) dispersion and a nearly metallic character; the top of the hole-like surface band is just below the Fermi level. The size of the Rashba parameter ($\alpha_{\rm R}$) reached quite a large value ($\sim$5.5 eV\AA). The present result would provide a fertile playground for further studies of the exotic electronic phenomena in 1D or Q1D systems with the spin-split electronic states as well as for advanced spintronic devices.
  • The major breakthroughs in the understanding of topological materials over the past decade were all triggered by the discovery of the Z$_2$ topological insulator (TI). In three dimensions (3D), the TI is classified as either "strong" or "weak", and experimental confirmations of the strong topological insulator (STI) rapidly followed the theoretical predictions. In contrast, the weak topological insulator has so far eluded experimental verification, since the topological surface states emerge only on particular side surfaces which are typically undetectable in real 3D crystals. Here we provide experimental evidence for the WTI state in a bismuth iodide, $\beta$-Bi4I4. Significantly, the crystal has naturally cleavable top and side planes both stacked via van-der-Waals forces, which have long been desirable for the experimental realization of the WTI state. As a definitive signature of it, we find quasi-1D Dirac TSS at the side-surface (100) while the top-surface (001) is topologically dark. Furthermore, a crystal transition from the $\beta$- to $\alpha$-phase drives a topological phase transition from a nontrivial WTI to the trivial insulator around room temperature. This topological phase, viewed as quantum spin Hall (QSH) insulators stacked three-dimensionally, and excellent functionality with on/off switching will lay a foundation for new technology benefiting from highly directional spin-currents with large density protected against backscattering.
  • One-dimensional (1D) electronic states were discovered on 1D surface atomic structure of Bi fabricated on semiconductor InSb(001) substrates by angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (ARPES). The 1D state showed steep, Dirac-cone-like dispersion along the 1D atomic structure with a finite direct bandgap opening as large as 150 meV. Moreover, spin-resolved ARPES revealed the spin polarization of the 1D unoccupied states as well as that of the occupied states, the orientation of which inverted depending on the wave vector direction parallel to the 1D array on the surface. These results reveal that a spin-polarized quasi-1D carrier was realized on the surface of 1D Bi with highly efficient backscattering suppression, showing promise for use in future spintronic and energy-saving devices.
  • We investigate the surface electronic structures of polar 1T'-MoTe2, the Weyl semimetal candidate realized through the nonpolar-polar structural phase transition, by utilizing the laser angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) combined with first-principles calculations. Two kinds of domains with different surface band dispersions are observed from a single-crystalline sample. The spin-resolved measurements further reveal that the spin polarizations of the surface and the bulk-derived states show the different domain-dependences, indicating the opposite bulk polarity. For both domains, some segment-like band features resembling the Fermi arcs are clearly observed. The patterns of the arcs present the marked contrast between the two domains, respectively agreeing well with the slab calculation of (0 0 1) and (0 0 -1) surfaces. The present result strongly suggests that the Fermi arc connects the identical pair of Weyl nodes on one side of the polar crystal surface, whereas it connects between the different pairs of Weyl nodes on the other side.
  • We use spin- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (SARPES) combined with polarization-variable laser and investigate the spin-orbit coupling effect under interband hybridization of Rashba spin-split states for the surface alloys Bi/Ag(111) and Bi/Cu(111). In addition to the conventional band mapping of photoemission for Rashba spin-splitting, the different orbital and spin parts of the surface wavefucntion are directly imaged into energy-momentum space. It is unambiguously revealed that the interband spin-orbit coupling modifies the spin and orbital character of the Rashba surface states leading to the enriched spin-orbital entanglement and the pronounced momentum dependence of the spin-polarization. The hybridization thus strongly deviates the spin and orbital characters from the standard Rashba model. The complex spin texture under interband spin-orbit hybridyzation proposed by first-principles calculation is experimentally unraveled by SARPES with a combination of p- and s-polarized light.
  • Interference of spin-up and spin-down eigenstates depicts spin rotation of electrons, which is a fundamental concept of quantum mechanics and accepts technological challenges for the electrical spin manipulation. Here, we visualize this coherent spin physics through laser spin- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy on a spin-orbital entangled surface-state of a topological insulator. It is unambiguously revealed that the linearly polarized laser can simultaneously excite spin-up and spin-down states and these quantum spin-basis are coherently superposed in photoelectron states. The superposition and the resulting spin rotation is arbitrary manipulated by the direction of the laser field. Moreover, the full observation of the spin rotation displays the phase of the quantum states. This presents a new facet of laser-photoemission technique for investigation of quantum spin physics opening new possibilities in the field of quantum spintronic applications.
  • We measure the band structure of nickel along various high-symmetry lines of the bulk Brillouin zone with angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy. The Gutzwiller theory for a nine-band Hubbard model whose tight-binding parameters are obtained from non-magnetic density-functional theory resolves most of the long-standing discrepancies between experiment and theory on nickel. Thereby we support the view of itinerant ferromagnetism as induced by atomic correlations.