• In this proceeding, we show how observations of Solar System Objects with Gaia can be used to test General Relativity and to constrain modified gravitational theories. The high number of Solar System objects observed and the variety of their orbital parameters associated with the impressive astrometric accuracy will allow us to perform local tests of General Relativity. In this communication, we present a preliminary sensitivity study of the Gaia observations on dynamical parameters such as the Sun quadrupolar moment and on various extensions to general relativity such as the parametrized post-Newtonian parameters, the fifth force formalism and a violation of Lorentz symmetry parametrized by the Standard-Model extension framework. We take into account the time sequences and the geometry of the observations that are particular to Gaia for its nominal mission (5 years) and for an extended mission (10 years).
  • Motion of short-period stars orbiting the supermassive black hole in our Galactic Center has been monitored for more than 20 years. These observations are currently offering a new way to test the gravitational theory in an unexplored regime: in a strong gravitational field, around a supermassive black hole. In this proceeding, we present three results: (i) a constraint on a hypothetical fifth force obtained by using 19 years of observations of the two best measured short-period stars S0-2 and S0-38 ; (ii) an upper limit on the secular advance of the argument of the periastron for the star S0-2 ; (iii) a sensitivity analysis showing that the relativistic redshift of S0-2 will be measured after its closest approach to the black hole in 2018.
  • In this Letter, we demonstrate that short-period stars orbiting around the supermassive black hole in our Galactic Center can successfully be used to probe the gravitational theory in a strong regime. We use 19 years of observations of the two best measured short-period stars orbiting our Galactic Center to constrain a hypothetical fifth force that arises in various scenarios motivated by the development of a unification theory or in some models of dark matter and dark energy. No deviation from General Relativity is reported and the fifth force strength is restricted to an upper 95% confidence limit of $\left|\alpha\right| < 0.016$ at a length scale of $\lambda=$ 150 astronomical units. We also derive a 95% confidence upper limit on a linear drift of the argument of periastron of the short-period star S0-2 of $\left|\dot \omega_\textrm{S0-2} \right|< 1.6 \times 10^{-3}$ rad/yr, which can be used to constrain various gravitational and astrophysical theories. This analysis provides the first fully self-consistent test of the gravitational theory using orbital dynamic in a strong gravitational regime, that of a supermassive black hole. A sensitivity analysis for future measurements is also presented.
  • Lorentz symmetry violations can be described by an effective field theory framework that contains both General Relativity and the Standard Model of particle physics called the Standard-Model extension (SME). Recently, post-fit analysis of Gravity Probe B and binary pulsars lead to an upper limit at the $10^{-4}$ level on the time-time coefficient $\bar s^{TT}$ of the pure-gravity sector of the minimal SME. In this work, we derive the observable of Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) in SME and then we implement it into a real data analysis code of geodetic VLBI observations. Analyzing all available observations recorded since 1979, we compare estimates of $\bar s^{TT}$ and errors obtained with various analysis schemes, including global estimations over several time spans and with various Sun elongation cut-off angles, and with analysis of radio source coordinate time series. We obtain a constraint on $\bar s^{TT}=(-5\pm 8)\times 10^{-5}$, directly fitted to the observations and improving by a factor 5 previous post-fit analysis estimates.
  • Lorentz symmetry violations can be parametrized by an effective field theory framework that contains both general relativity and the standard model of particle physics called the standard-model extension (SME). We present new constraints on pure gravity SME coefficients obtained by analyzing lunar laser ranging (LLR) observations. We use a new numerical lunar ephemeris computed in the SME framework and we perform a LLR data analysis using a set of 20721 normal points covering the period of August, 1969 to December, 2013. We emphasize that linear combination of SME coefficients to which LLR data are sensitive and not the same as those fitted in previous postfit residuals analysis using LLR observations and based on theoretical grounds. We found no evidence for Lorentz violation at the level of $10^{-8}$ for $\bar{s}^{TX}$, $10^{-12}$ for $\bar{s}^{XY}$ and $\bar{s}^{XZ}$, $10^{-11}$ for $\bar{s}^{XX}-\bar{s}^{YY}$ and $\bar{s}^{XX}+\bar{s}^{YY}-2\bar{s}^{ZZ}-4.5\bar{s}^{YZ}$ and $10^{-9}$ for $\bar{s}^{TY}+0.43\bar{s}^{TZ}$. We improve previous constraints on SME coefficient by a factor up to 5 and 800 compared to postfit residuals analysis of respectively binary pulsars and LLR observations.
  • We use six years of accurate hyperfine frequency comparison data of the dual rubidium and caesium cold atom fountain FO2 at LNE-SYRTE to search for a massive scalar dark matter candidate. Such a scalar field can induce harmonic variations of the fine structure constant, of the mass of fermions and of the quantum chromodynamic mass scale, which will directly impact the rubidium/caesium hyperfine transition frequency ratio. We find no signal consistent with a scalar dark matter candidate but provide improved constraints on the coupling of the putative scalar field to standard matter. Our limits are complementary to previous results that were only sensitive to the fine structure constant, and improve them by more than an order of magnitude when only a coupling to electromagnetism is assumed.
  • Lorentz symmetry violations can be parametrized by an effective field theory framework that contains both General Relativity and the Standard Model of particle physics, called the Standard-Model Extension or SME. We consider in this work only the pure gravitational sector of the minimal SME. We present new constraints on the SME coefficients obtained from lunar laser ranging, very long baseline interferometry, and planetary motions.
  • The Einstein Equivalence Principle is a fundamental principle of the theory of General Relativity. While this principle has been thoroughly tested with standard matter, the question of its validity in the Dark sector remains open. In this paper, we consider a general tensor-scalar theory that allows to test the equivalence principle in the Dark sector by introducing two different conformal couplings to standard matter and to Dark matter. We constrain these couplings by considering galactic observations of strong lensing and of velocity dispersion. Our analysis shows that, in the case of a violation of the Einstein Equivalence Principle, data favour violations through coupling strengths that are of opposite signs for ordinary and Dark matter. At the same time, our analysis does not show any significant deviations from General Relativity.
  • In this paper, we present extensively the observational consequences of massless dilaton theories at the post-Newtonian level. We extend previous work by considering a general model including a dilaton-Ricci coupling as well as a general dilaton kinetic term while using the microphysical dilaton-matter coupling model proposed in [Damour and Donoghue, PRD 2010]. We derive all the expressions needed to analyze local gravitational observations in a dilaton framework, which is useful to derive constraints on the dilaton theories. In particular, we present the equations of motion of celestial bodies (in barycentric and planetocentric reference frames), the equation of propagation of light and the evolution of proper time as measured by specific clocks. Particular care is taken in order to derive properly the observables. The resulting equations can be used to analyse a large numbers of observations: universality of free fall tests, planetary ephemerides analysis, analysis of satellites motion, Very Long Baseline Interferometry, tracking of spacecraft, gravitational redshift tests, ...
  • In this communication, we show how asteroids observations from the Gaia mission can be used to perform local tests of General Relativity (GR). This ESA mission, launched in December 2013, will observe --in addition to the stars-- a large number of small Solar System Objects (SSOs) with unprecedented astrometric precision. Indeed, it is expected that about 360,000 asteroids will be observed with a nominal sub-mas precision. Here, we show how these observations can be used to constrain some extensions to General Relativity. We present results of SSOs simulations that take into account the time sequences over 5 years and geometry of the observations that are particular to Gaia. We present a sensitivity study on various GR extensions and dynamical parameters including: the Sun quadrupolar moment $J_2$, the parametrized post-Newtonian parameter $\beta$, the Nordtvedt parameter $\eta$, the fifth force formalism, the Lense-Thirring effect, a temporal variation of the gravitational parameter $GM_\textrm{sun}$ (a linear variation as well as a periodic variation), the Standard Model Extension formalism,... Some implications for planetary ephemerides analysis are also briefly discussed.
  • The Einstein Equivalence Principle (EEP) is one of the foundations of the theory of General Relativity and several alternative theories of gravitation predict violations of the EEP. Experimental constraints on this fundamental principle of nature are therefore of paramount importance. The EEP can be split in three sub-principles: the Universality of Free Fall (UFF), the Local Lorentz Invariance (LLI) and the Local Position Invariance (LPI). In this paper we propose to use stable clocks in eccentric orbits to perform a test of the gravitational redshift, a consequence of the LPI. The best test to date was performed with the Gravity Probe A (GP-A) experiment in 1976 with an uncertainty of $1.4\times10^{-4}$. Our proposal considers the opportunity of using Galileo satellites 5 and 6 to improve on the GP-A test uncertainty. We show that considering realistic noise and systematic effects, and thanks to a highly eccentric orbit, it is possible to improve on the GP-A limit to an uncertainty around $(3-4)\times 10^{-5}$ after one year of integration of Galileo 5 and 6 data.
  • The Modified Newtonian Dynamics (MOND) paradigm generically predicts that the external gravitational field in which a system is embedded can produce effects on its internal dynamics. In this communication, we first show that this External Field Effect can significantly improve some galactic rotation curves fits by decreasing the predicted velocities of the external part of the rotation curves. In modified gravity versions of MOND, this External Field Effect also appears in the Solar System and leads to a very good way to constrain the transition function of the theory. A combined analysis of the galactic rotation curves and Solar System constraints (provided by the Cassini spacecraft) rules out several classes of popular MOND transition functions, but leaves others viable. Moreover, we show that LISA Pathfinder will not be able to improve the current constraints on these still viable transition functions.
  • In this communication, we consider a wide class of extensions to General Relativity that break explicitly the Einstein Equivalence Principle by introducing a multiplicative coupling between a scalar field and the electromagnetic Lagrangian. In these theories, we show that 4 cosmological observables are intimately related to each other: a temporal variation of the fine structure constant, a violation of the distance-duality relation, the evolution of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature and CMB spectral distortions. This enables one to put very stringent constraints on possible violations of the distance-duality relation, on the evolution of the CMB temperature and on admissible CMB spectral distortions using current constraints on the fine structure constant. Alternatively, this offers interesting possibilities to test a wide range of theories of gravity by analyzing several data sets concurrently.
  • We show how two seemingly different theories with a scalar multiplicative coupling to electrodynamics are actually two equivalent parametrisations of the same theory: despite some differences in the interpretation of some phenemenological aspects of the parametrisations, they lead to the same physical observables. This is illustrated on the interpretation of observations of the Cosmic Microwave Background.
  • This paper proposes a systematic study of cosmological signatures of modifications of gravity via the presence of a scalar field with a multiplicative coupling to the electromagnetic Lagrangian. We show that, in this framework, variations of the fine structure constant, violations of the distance duality relation, evolution of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature and CMB distortions are intimately and unequivocally linked. This enables one to put very stringent constraints on possible violations of the distance duality relation, on the evolution of the CMB temperature and on admissible CMB distortions using current constraints on the fine structure constant. Alternatively, this offers interesting possibilities to test a wide range of theories of gravity by analysing several datasets concurrently. We discuss results obtained using current data as well as some forecasts for future data sets such as those coming from EUCLID or the SKA.
  • Determining range, Doppler and astrometric observables is of crucial interest for modelling and analyzing space observations. We recall how these observables can be computed when the travel time of a light ray is known as a function of the positions of the emitter and the receiver for a given instant of reception (or emission). For a long time, such a function--called a reception (or emission) time transfer function--has been almost exclusively calculated by integrating the null geodesic equations describing the light rays. However, other methods avoiding such an integration have been considerably developped in the last twelve years. We give a survey of the analytical results obtained with these new methods up to the third order in the gravitational constant $G$ for a mass monopole. We briefly discuss the case of quasi-conjunctions, where higher-order enhanced terms must be taken into account for correctly calculating the effects. We summarize the results obtained at the first order in $G$ when the multipole structure and the motion of an axisymmetric body is taken into account. We present some applications to on-going or future missions like Gaia and Juno. We give a short review of the recent works devoted to the numerical estimates of the time transfer functions and their derivatives.
  • Given the extreme accuracy of modern space science, a precise relativistic modeling of observations is required. We use the Time Transfer Functions formalism to study light propagation in the field of uniformly moving axisymmetric bodies, which extends the field of application of previous works. We first present a space-time metric adapted to describe the geometry of an ensemble of uniformly moving bodies. Then, we show that the expression of the Time Transfer Functions in the field of a uniformly moving body can be easily derived from its well-known expression in a stationary field by using a change of variables. We also give a general expression of the Time Transfer Function in the case of an ensemble of arbitrarily moving point masses. This result is given in the form of an integral easily computable numerically. We also provide the derivatives of the Time Transfer Function in this case, which are mandatory to compute Doppler and astrometric observables. We particularize our results in the case of moving axisymmetric bodies. Finally, we apply our results to study the different relativistic contributions to the range and Doppler tracking for the JUNO mission in the Jovian system.
  • The MOdified Newtonian Dynamics (MOND) is an attempt to modify the gravitation theory to solve the Dark Matter problem. This phenomenology is very successful at the galactic level. The main effect produced by MOND in the Solar System is called the External Field Effect parametrized by the parameter $Q_2$. We have used 9 years of Cassini range and Doppler measurements to constrain $Q_2$. Our estimate of this parameter based on Cassini data is given by $Q_2=(3 \pm 3)\times 10^{-27} \ \rm{s^{-2}}$ which shows no deviation from General Relativity and excludes a large part of the relativistic MOND theories. This limit can also be interpreted as a limit on a external tidal potential acting on the Solar System coming from the internal mass of our galaxy (including Dark Matter) or from a new hypothetical body.
  • In this communication, the current tests of gravitation available at Solar System scales are recalled. These tests rely mainly on two frameworks: the PPN framework and the search for a fifth force. Some motivations are given to look for deviations from General Relativity in other frameworks than the two extensively considered. A recent analysis of Cassini data in a MOND framework is presented. Furthermore, possibilities to constrain Standard Model Extension parameters using Solar System data are developed.
  • Given the extreme accuracy of modern space science, a precise relativistic modeling of observations is required. In particular, it is important to describe properly light propagation through the Solar System. For two decades, several modeling efforts based on the solution of the null geodesic equations have been proposed but they are mainly valid only for the first order Post-Newtonian approximation. However, with the increasing precision of ongoing space missions as Gaia, GAME, BepiColombo, JUNO or JUICE, we know that some corrections up to the second order have to be taken into account for future experiments. We present a procedure to compute the relativistic coordinate time delay, Doppler and astrometric observables avoiding the integration of the null geodesic equation. This is possible using the Time Transfer Function formalism, a powerful tool providing key quantities such as the time of flight of a light signal between two point-events and the tangent vector to its null-geodesic. Indeed we show how to compute the Time Transfer Functions and their derivatives (and thus range, Doppler and astrometric observables) up to the second post-Minkowskian order. We express these quantities as quadratures of some functions that depend only on the metric and its derivatives evaluated along a Minkowskian straight line. This method is particularly well adapted for numerical estimations. As an illustration, we provide explicit expressions in static and spherically symmetric space-time up to second post-Minkowskian order. Then we give the order of magnitude of these corrections for the range/Doppler on the BepiColombo mission and for astrometry in a GAME-like observation.
  • In this communication, we focus on possibilities to constrain SME coefficients using Cassini and Messenger data. We present simulations of radioscience observables within the framework of the SME, identify the linear combinations of SME coefficients the observations depend on and determine the sensitivity of these measurements to the SME coefficients. We show that these datasets are very powerful for constraining SME coefficients.
  • In this communication, we focus on the possibility to test General Relativity (GR) with radioscience experiments. We present simulations of observables performed in alternative theories of gravity using a software that simulates Range/Doppler signals directly from the space time metric. This software allows one to get the order of magnitude and the signature of the modifications induced by an alternative theory of gravity on radioscience signals. As examples, we present some simulations for the Cassini mission in Post-Einsteinian gravity (PEG) and with Standard Model Extension (SME).
  • The chameleon mechanism appearing in massive tensor-scalar theory of gravity can effectively reduce the nonminimal coupling between the scalar field and matter. This mechanism is invoked to reconcile cosmological data requiring introduction of Dark Energy with small-scale stringent constraints on General Relativity. In this communication, we present constraints on this mechanism obtained by a cosmological analysis (based on Supernovae Ia data) and by a Solar System analysis (based on PPN formalism).
  • In this paper, we focus on the possibility to test General Relativity in the Solar System with radioscience measurements. To this aim, we present a new software that simulates Range and Doppler signals directly from the space-time metric. This flexible approach allows one to perform simulations in General Relativity and in alternative metric theories of gravity. In a second step, a least-squares fit of the different initial conditions involved in the situation is performed in order to compare anomalous signals produced by a given alternative theory with the ones obtained in General Relativity. This software provides orders of magnitude and signatures stemming from hypothetical alternative theories of gravity on radioscience signals. As an application, we present some simulations done for the Cassini mission in Post-Einsteinian Gravity and in the context of MOND External Field Effect. We deduce constraints on the Post-Einsteinian parameters but find that the considered arc of the Cassini mission is not useful to constrain the MOND External Field Effect.
  • A lot of fundamental tests of gravitational theories rely on highly precise measurements of the travel time and/or the frequency shift of electromagnetic signals propagating through the gravitational field of the Solar System. In practically all of the previous studies, the explicit expressions of such travel times and frequency shifts as predicted by various metric theories of gravity are derived from an integration of the null geodesic differential equations. However, the solution of the geodesic equations requires heavy calculations when one has to take into account the presence of mass multipoles in the gravitational field or the tidal effects due to the planetary motions, and the calculations become quite complicated in the post-post-Minkowskian approximation. This difficult task can be avoided using the time transfer function's formalism. We present here our last advances in the formulation of the one-way frequency shift using this formalism up to the post-post-Minkowskian approximation.