• We present ALMA Band 6 $^{12}$CO(2--1) line and rest-frame 232GHz continuum observations of the nearby Compton-thick Seyfert galaxy NGC5643 with angular resolutions 0.11-0.26arcsec (9-21pc). The CO(2--1) integrated line map reveals emission from the nuclear and circumnuclear region with a two-arm nuclear spiral extending 10arcsec on each side. The circumnuclear CO(2--1) kinematics can be fitted with a rotating disk, although there are regions with large residual velocities and/or velocity dispersions. The CO(2--1) line profiles of these regions show two different velocity components. One is ascribed to the circular component and the other to the interaction of the AGN outflow, as traced by the [O III]5007AA emission, with molecular gas in the disk a few hundred parsecs from the AGN. On nuclear scales, we detected an inclined CO(2--1) disk (diameter 26 pc, FWHM) oriented almost in a north-south direction. The CO(2--1) nuclear kinematics can be fitted with a rotating disk which appears to be tilted with respect to the large scale disk. There are strong non-circular motions in the central 0.2-0.3 arcsec with velocities of up to 110km/s. In the absence of a nuclear bar, these motions could be explained as radial outflows in the nuclear disk. We estimate a total molecular gas mass for the nuclear disk of $M({\rm H}_2)=1.1\times 10^7\,M_\odot$ and an H$_2$ column density toward the location of the AGN of $N({\rm H}_2)\sim 5 \times 10^{23}\,{\rm cm}^{-2}$, for a standard CO-to-H$_2$ conversion factor. We interpret this nuclear molecular gas disk as the obscuring torus of NGC5643 as well as the collimating structure of the ionization cone.
  • We have undertaken a comprehensive search for both Lyman Alpha Emitters (LAEs) and Lyman Break Galaxies (LBGs) in the SHARDS Survey of the GOODS-N field. SHARDS is a deep imaging survey, made with the 10.4 m Gran Telescopio Canarias (GTC), employing 25 medium band filters in the range from 500 to 941 nm. This is the first time that both LAEs and LBGs are surveyed simultaneously in a systematic way in a large field. We draw a sample of 1558 sources; 528 of them are LAEs. Most of the sources (1434) show rest-frame UV continua. A minority of them (124) are pure LAEs with virtually no continuum detected in SHARDS. We study these sources from $z\sim3.35$ up to $z\sim6.8$, well into the epoch of reionization. Note that surveys done with just one or two narrow band filters lack the possibility to spot the rest-frame UV continuum present in most of our LAEs. We derive redshifts, Star Formation Rates (SFRs), Ly$\alpha$ Equivalent Widths (EWs) and Luminosity Functions (LFs). Grouping within our sample is also studied, finding 92 pairs or small groups of galaxies at the same redshift separated by less than 60 comoving kpc. In addition, we relate 87 and 55 UV-selected objects with two known overdensities at $z=4.05$ and $z=5.198$, respectively. Finally, we show that surveys made with broad band filters are prone to introduce many unwanted sources ($\sim20$% interlopers), which means that previous studies may be overestimating the calculated LFs, specially at the faint end.
  • The physical processes driving the evolution of star formation (SF) in galaxies over cosmic time still present many open questions. Recent galaxy surveys allow now to study these processes in great detail at intermediate redshift. In this work, we build a complete sample of star-forming galaxies and analyze their properties, reaching systems with low stellar masses and low star formation rates (SFRs) at intermediate-to-low redshift. We use data from the SHARDS multiband survey in the GOODS-North field. Its depth (up to magnitude $\langle m_{3\sigma}\rangle\sim26.5$) and its spectro-photometric resolution ($R\sim50$) provides us with an ideal dataset to search for emission line galaxies (ELGs). We develop a new algorithm to identify low-redshift ($z$<0.36) ELGs by detecting the [OIII]5007 and $H\alpha$ emission lines simultaneously. We fit the spectral energy distribution (SED) of the selected sample, using a model with two single stellar populations. We find 160 star-forming galaxies with equivalent widths (EWs) as low as 12 {\AA}, with median values for the sample of $\sim$ 35 {\AA} in [OIII]5007 and $\sim$ 56 {\AA} in $H\alpha$, respectively. Results from the SED fitting show a young stellar population with low median metallicity (36% of the solar value) and extinction ($A_V \sim$ 0.37), with median galaxy stellar mass $\sim$ 10$^{8.5}$ M$_{\odot}$. Gas-phase metallicities measured from available spectra are also low. ELGs in our sample present bluer colors in the UVJ plane than the median color-selected star-forming galaxy in SHARDS. We suggest a new (V-J) color criterion to separate ELGs from non-ELGs in blue galaxy samples. In addition, several galaxies present high densities of O-type stars. Robust fits to the full SEDs can only be obtained including an old stellar population, suggesting the young component is built up by a recent burst of SF in an otherwise old galaxy.
  • We make use of SHARDS, an ultra-deep (<26.5AB) galaxy survey that provides optical photo-spectra at resolution R~50, via medium band filters (FWHM~150A). This dataset is combined with ancillary optical and NIR fluxes to constrain the dust attenuation law in the rest-frame NUV region of star-forming galaxies within the redshift window 1.5<z<3. We focus on the NUV bump strength (B) and the total-to-selective extinction ratio (Rv), targeting a sample of 1,753 galaxies. By comparing the data with a set of population synthesis models coupled to a parametric dust attenuation law, we constrain Rv and B, as well as the colour excess, E(B-V). We find a correlation between Rv and B, that can be interpreted either as a result of the grain size distribution, or a variation of the dust geometry among galaxies. According to the former, small dust grains are associated with a stronger NUV bump. The latter would lead to a range of clumpiness in the distribution of dust within the interstellar medium of star-forming galaxies. The observed wide range of NUV bump strengths can lead to a systematic in the interpretation of the UV slope ($\beta$) typically used to characterize the dust content. In this study we quantify these variations, concluding that the effects are $\Delta\beta$~0.4.
  • We present new calculations of the CAT3D clumpy torus models, which now include a more physical dust sublimation model as well as AGN anisotropic emission. These new models allow graphite grains to persist at temperatures higher than the silicate dust sublimation temperature. This produces stronger near-infrared emission and bluer mid-infrared (MIR) spectral slopes. We make a statistical comparison of the CAT3D model MIR predictions with a compilation of sub-arcsecond resolution ground-based MIR spectroscopy of 52 nearby Seyfert galaxies (median distance of 36 Mpc) and 10 quasars. We focus on the AGN MIR spectral index $\alpha_{MIR}$ and the strength of the 9.7 $\mu$m silicate feature $S_{Sil}$. As with other clumpy torus models, the new CAT3D models do not reproduce the Seyfert galaxies with deep silicate absorption ($S_{Sil}<-1$). Excluding those, we conclude that the new CAT3D models are in better agreement with the observed $\alpha_{MIR}$ and $S_{Sil}$ of Seyfert galaxies and quasars. We find that Seyfert 2 are reproduced with models with low photon escape probabilities, while the quasars and the Seyfert 1-1.5 require generally models with higher photon escape probabilities. Quasars and Seyfert 1-1.5 tend to show steeper radial cloud distributions and fewer clouds along an equatorial line-of-sight than Seyfert 2. Introducing AGN anisotropic emission besides the more physical dust sublimation models alleviates the problem of requiring inverted radial cloud distributions (i.e., more clouds towards the outer parts of the torus) to explain the MIR spectral indices of type 2 Seyferts.
  • Dedicated searches generally find a decreasing fraction of obscured Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) with increasing AGN luminosity. This has often been interpreted as evidence for a decrease of the covering factor of the AGN torus with increasing luminosity, the so-called receding torus models. Using a complete flux-limited X-ray selected sample of 199 AGN, from the Bright Ultra-hard XMM-Newton Survey, we determine the intrinsic fraction of optical type-2 AGN at 0.05$\leq$z$\leq$1 as a function of rest-frame 2-10 keV X-ray luminosity from 10$^{42}$ to 10$^{45}$ erg/s. We use the distributions of covering factors of AGN tori derived from CLUMPY torus models. Since these distributions combined over the total AGN population need to match the intrinsic type-2 AGN fraction, we reveal a population of X-ray undetected objects with high-covering factor tori, which are increasingly numerous at higher AGN luminosities. When these "missing" objects are included, we find that Compton-thick AGN account at most for 37$_{-10}^{+9}$% of the total population. The intrinsic type-2 AGN fraction is 58$\pm$4% and has a weak, non-significant (less than 2$\sigma$) luminosity dependence. This contradicts the results generally reported by AGN surveys, and the expectations from receding torus models. Our findings imply that the majority of luminous rapidly-accreting supermassive black holes at z<1 reside in highly-obscured nuclear environments but most of them are so deeply embedded that they have so far escaped detection in X-rays in <10 keV wide-area surveys.
  • Several authors have claimed that the less luminous active galactic nuclei (AGN) are not capable of sustaining the dusty torus structure. Thus, a gradual re-sizing of the torus is expected when the AGN luminosity decreases. Our aim is to confront mid-infrared observations of local AGN of different luminosities with this scenario. We decomposed about ~100 IRS/Spitzer spectra of LLAGN and powerful Seyferts in order to decontaminate the torus component from other contributors. We have used the affinity propagation (AP) method to cluster the data into five groups within the sample according to torus contribution to the 5-15 um range (Ctorus) and bolometric luminosity. The AP groups show a progressively higher torus contribution and an increase of the bolometric luminosity, from Group 1 (Ctorus~ 0% and logLbol ~ 41) and up to Group 5 (Ctorus ~80% and log(Lbol) ~44). We have fitted the average spectra of each of the AP groups to clumpy models. The torus is no longer present in Group 1, supporting the disappearance at low-luminosities. We were able to fit the average spectra for the torus component in Groups 3 (Ctorus~ 40% and log(Lbol)~ 42.6), 4 (Ctorus~ 60% and log(Lbol)~ 43.7), and 5 to Clumpy torus models. We did not find a good fitting to Clumpy torus models for Group 2 (Ctorus~ 18% and log(Lbol)~ 42). This might suggest a different configuration and/or composition of the clouds for Group 2, which is consistent with a different gas content seen in Groups 1, 2, and 3, according to the detections of H2 molecular lines. Groups 3, 4, and 5 show a trend to decrease of the width of the torus (which yields to a likely decrease of the geometrical covering factor), although we cannot confirm it with the present data. Finally, Groups 3, 4, and 5 show an increase on the outer radius of the torus for higher luminosities, consistent with a re-sizing of the torus according to the AGN luminosity.
  • We present mid-infrared (MIR, 7.5-13.5 $\mu$m) imaging and spectroscopy observations obtained with the CanariCam (CC) instrument on the 10.4m Gran Telescopio CANARIAS for a sample of 20 nearby, MIR bright and X-ray luminous QSOs. We find that for the majority of QSOs the MIR emission is unresolved at angular scales nearly 0.3 arcsec, corresponding to physical scales $<600$ pc. We find that the higher-spatial resolution CC spectra have similar shapes to those obtained with Spitzer/IRS, and hence we can assume that the spectra are not heavily contaminated by extended emission in the host galaxy. We thus take advantage of the higher signal to noise Spitzer/IRS spectra, as a fair representation of the nuclear emission, to decompose it into a combination of active galactic nuclei (AGN), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) and stellar components. In most cases the AGN is the dominant component, with a median contribution of 85 per cent of the continuum light at MIR (5-15 $\mu$m) within the IRS slit. This IR AGN emission is well reproduced by clumpy torus models. We find evidence for significant differences in the parameters that describe the dusty tori of QSOs when compared with the same parameters of Seyfert 1 and 2 nuclei. In particular, we find a lower number of clouds ($N_{0}<12$), steeper radial distribution of clouds ($q=1.5-3.0$), and clouds that are less optically thick ($\tau_{V}<100$) than in Seyfert 1, which could be attributed to dusty structures that have been partially evaporated and piled up by the higher radiation field in QSOs. We find that the combination of the angular width $\sigma_{torus}$, viewing angle $i$, and number of clouds along the equatorial line $N_{0}$, produces large escape probabilities ($P_{esc} > 2$ per cent) and low geometrical covering factors ($f_{2}<0.6$), as expected for AGN with broad lines in their optical spectra.
  • We investigate the evolutionary connection between local IR-bright galaxies ($\log L_{\rm IR}\ge 11.4\,L_\odot$) and quasars. We use high angular resolution ($\sim$ 0.3-0.4 arcsec $\sim$ few hundred parsecs) $8-13\,\mu$m ground-based spectroscopy to disentangle the AGN mid-IR properties from those of star formation. The comparison between the nuclear $11.3\,\mu$m PAH feature emission and that measured with Spitzer/IRS indicates that the star formation is extended over a few kpc in the IR-bright galaxies. The AGN contribution to the total IR luminosity of IR-bright galaxies is lower than in quasars. Although the dust distribution is predicted to change as IR-bright galaxies evolve to IR-bright quasars and then to optical quasars, we show that the AGN mid-IR emission of all the quasars in our sample is not significantly different. In contrast, the nuclear emission of IR-bright galaxies with low AGN contributions appears more heavily embedded in dust although there is no clear trend with the interaction stage or projected nuclear separation. This suggests that the changes in the distribution of the nuclear obscuring material may be taking place rapidly and at different interaction stages washing out the evidence of an evolutionary path. When compared to normal AGN, the nuclear star formation activity of quasars appears to be dimming whereas it is enhanced in some IR-bright nuclei, suggesting that the latter are in an earlier star-formation dominated phase.
  • We present subarcsecond resolution mid-infrared (MIR) images obtained with 8-10 m-class ground-based telescopes of a complete volume-limited (DL<40 Mpc) sample of 24 Seyfert galaxies selected from the Swift/BAT nine month catalog. We use those MIR images to study the nuclear and circumnuclear emission of the galaxies. Using different methods to classify the MIR morphologies on scales of ~400 pc, we find that the majority of the galaxies (75-83%) are extended or possibly extended and 17-25% are point-like. This extended emission is compact and it has low surface brightness compared with the nuclear emission, and it represents, on average, ~30% of the total MIR emission of the galaxies in the sample. We find that the galaxies whose circumnuclear MIR emission is dominated by star formation show more extended emission (650+-700 pc) than AGN-dominated systems (300+-100 pc). In general, the galaxies with point-like MIR morphologies are face-on or moderately inclined (b/a~0.4-1.0), and we do not find significant differences between the morphologies of Sy1 and Sy2. We used the nuclear and circumnuclear fluxes to investigate their correlation with different AGN and SF activity indicators. We find that the nuclear MIR emission (the inner ~70 pc) is strongly correlated with the X-ray emission (the harder the X-rays the better the correlation) and with the [O IV] lambda 25.89 micron emission line, indicating that it is AGN-dominated. We find the same results, although with more scatter, for the circumnuclear emission, which indicates that the AGN dominates the MIR emission in the inner ~400 pc of the galaxies, with some contribution from star formation.
  • We present far-infrared (FIR) $70-500\,\mu$m imaging observations obtained with Herschel/PACS and SPIRE of 33 nearby (median distance of 30 Mpc) Seyfert galaxies from the Revised Shapley-Ames (RSA) catalogue. We obtain the FIR nuclear ($r=1\,$kpc and $r=2\,$kpc) and integrated spectral energy distributions (SEDs). We estimate the unresolved nuclear emission at 70 $\mu$m and we fit the nuclear and integrated FIR SEDs with a grey body model. We find that the integrated FIR emission of the RSA Seyferts in our sample is dominated by emission from the host galaxy, with dust properties similar to those of normal galaxies (non AGN). We use four criteria to select galaxies whose nuclear $70\,\mu$m emission has a significant AGN contribution: (1) elevated 70/160 $\mu$m flux ratios, (2)spatially resolved, high dust temperature gradient, (3) $70\,\mu$m excess emission with respect to the fit of the FIR SEDs with a grey body, and (4) excess of nuclear SFR obtained from $70\,\mu$m over SFR from mid-infrared indicators. 16 galaxies (48 per cent of the initial sample) satisfy at least one of these conditions, whereas 10 satisfy half or more. After careful examination of these, we select six bona fide candidates (18 per cent of the initial sample) and estimate that $\sim 40-70$ per cent of their nuclear ($r=1-2\,$kpc) $70\,\mu$m emission is contributed by dust heated by the AGN.
  • We present the distributions of geometrical covering factors of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) dusty tori (f2) using an X-ray selected complete sample of 227 AGN drawn from the Bright Ultra-hard XMM-Newton Survey. The AGN have z from 0.05 to 1.7, 2-10 keV luminosities between 10^42 and 10^46 erg/s and Compton-thin X-ray absorption. Employing data from UKIDSS, 2MASS and the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer in a previous work we determined the rest-frame 1-20 microns continuum emission from the torus which we model here with the clumpy torus models of Nenkova et al. Optically classified type 1 and type 2 AGN are intrinsically different, with type 2 AGN having on average tori with higher f2 than type 1 AGN. Nevertheless, ~20 per cent of type 1 AGN have tori with large covering factors while ~23-28 per cent of type 2 AGN have tori with small covering factors. Low f2 are preferred at high AGN luminosities, as postulated by simple receding torus models, although for type 2 AGN the effect is certainly small. f2 increases with the X-ray column density, which implies that dust extinction an X-ray absorption takes place in material that shares an overall geometry and most likely belongs to the same structure, the putative torus. Based on our results, the viewing angle, AGN luminosity and also f2 determine the optical appearance of an AGN and control the shape of the rest-frame ~1-20 microns nuclear continuum emission. Thus, the torus geometrical covering factor is a key ingredient of unification schemes.
  • We present an atlas of mid-infrared (mid-IR) ~7.5-13micron spectra of 45 local active galactic nuclei (AGN) obtained with CanariCam on the 10.4m Gran Telescopio CANARIAS (GTC) as part of an ESO/GTC large program. The sample includes Seyferts and other low luminosity AGN (LLAGN) at a median distance of 35Mpc and luminous AGN, namely PG quasars, (U)LIRGs, and radio galaxies (RG) at a median distance of 254Mpc. To date, this is the largest mid-IR spectroscopic catalog of local AGN at sub-arcsecond resolution (median 0.3arcsec). The goal of this work is to give an overview of the spectroscopic properties of the sample. The nuclear 12micron luminosities of the AGN span more than four orders of magnitude, nu*Lnu(12micron)~ 3e41-1e46erg/s. In a simple mid-IR spectral index vs. strength of the 9.7micron silicate feature diagram most LLAGN, Seyfert nuclei, PG quasars, and RGs lie in the region occupied by clumpy torus model tracks. However, the mid-IR spectra of some might include contributions from other mechanisms. Most (U)LIRG nuclei in our sample have deeper silicate features and flatter spectral indices than predicted by these models suggesting deeply embedded dust heating sources and/or contribution from star formation. The 11.3micron PAH feature is clearly detected in approximately half of the Seyfert nuclei, LLAGN, and (U)LIRGs. While the RG, PG quasars, and (U)LIRGs in our sample have similar nuclear 12micron luminosities, we do not detect nuclear PAH emission in the RGs and PG quasars.
  • We present an analysis of the nuclear infrared (IR, 1.6 to 18 $\mu$m) emission of the ultraluminous IR galaxy UGC 5101 to derive the properties of its active galactic nucleus (AGN) and its obscuring material. We use new mid-IR high angular resolution ($0.3-0.5$ arcsec) imaging using the Si-2 filter ($\lambda_{C}=8.7\, \mu$m) and $7.5-13$ $\mu$m spectroscopy taken with CanariCam (CC) on the 10.4m Gran Telescopio CANARIAS. We also use archival HST/NICMOS and Subaru/COMICS imaging and Spitzer/IRS spectroscopy. We estimate the near- and mid-IR unresolved nuclear emission by modelling the imaging data with GALFIT. We decompose the Spitzer/IRS and CC spectra using a power-law component, which represents the emission due to dust heated by the AGN, and a starburst component, both affected by foreground extinction. We model the resulting unresolved near- and mid-IR, and the starburst subtracted CC spectrum with the CLUMPY torus models of Nenkova et al. The derived geometrical properties of the torus, including the large covering factor and the high foreground extinction needed to reproduce the deep $9.7\, \mu$m silicate feature, are consistent with the lack of strong AGN signatures in the optical. We derive an AGN bolometric luminosity $L_{bol}\sim1.9\times10^{45}\,$erg s$^{-1}$ that is in good agreement with other estimates in the literature.
  • We have determined the relation between the AGN luminosities at rest-frame 6 {\mu}m associated to the dusty torus emission and at 2-10 keV energies using a complete, X-ray flux limited sample of 232 AGN drawn from the Bright Ultra-hard XMM-Newton Survey. The objects have intrinsic X-ray luminosities between 10^42 and 10^46 erg/s and redshifts from 0.05 to 2.8. The rest-frame 6 {\mu}m luminosities were computed using data from the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer and are based on a spectral energy distribution decomposition into AGN and galaxy emission. The best-fit relationship for the full sample is consistent with being linear, L_6 {\mu}m $\propto$ L_2-10 keV^0.99$\pm$0.032, with intrinsic scatter, ~0.35 dex in log L_6 {\mu}m. The L_6 {\mu}m/L_2-10 keV luminosity ratio is largely independent on the line-of-sight X-ray absorption. Assuming a constant X-ray bolometric correction, the fraction of AGN bolometric luminosity reprocessed in the mid-IR decreases weakly, if at all, with the AGN luminosity, a finding at odds with simple receding torus models. Type 2 AGN have redder mid-IR continua at rest-frame wavelengths <12 {\mu}m and are overall ~1.3-2 times fainter at 6 {\mu}m than type 1 AGN at a given X-ray luminosity. Regardless of whether type 1 and type 2 AGN have the same or different nuclear dusty toroidal structures, our results imply that the AGN emission at rest-frame 6 {\mu}m is not isotropic due to self-absorption in the dusty torus, as predicted by AGN torus models. Thus, AGN surveys at rest-frame 6 {\mu}m are subject to modest dust obscuration biases.
  • (Abridged) We probe the merging channel of massive galaxies over the z=0.3-1.3 redshift window by studying close pairs in a sample of 238 galaxies with stellar mass >1E11Msun, from the deep (m<26.5AB, 3 sigma) SHARDS survey. SHARDS provides medium band photometry equivalent to low-resolution optical spectra (R~50), allowing us to obtain extremely accurate photometric redshifts (|Dz|/(1+z)~0.55%) and to improve the constraints on the age distribution of the stellar populations. A strong correlation is found between the age difference of central and satellite galaxy and stellar mass ratio, from negligible age differences in major mergers to age differences ~4 Gyr for 1:100 minor mergers. However, this correlation is simply a reflection of the mass-age trend in the general population. The dominant contributor to the growth of massive galaxies corresponds to mass ratios mu=Msat/Mcen>0.3, followed by a decrease in the fractional mass growth rate linearly proportional to log mu, at least down to mu~0.01, suggesting a decreasing role of mergers involving low-mass satellites, especially if dynamical friction timescales are taken into account. A simple model results in an upper limit for the average mass growth rate of massive galaxies of DM/M/Dt~ 0.08+-0.02 per Gyr, over the z<1 range, with a ~70% fractional contribution from (major) mergers with mu>0.3. The majority of the stellar mass contributed by mergers does not introduce significantly younger populations, in agreement with the small radial age gradients observed in present-day early-type galaxies.
  • We present Gran Telescopio CANARIAS CanariCam 8.7$\mu$m imaging and 7.5-13$\mu$m spectroscopy of six local systems known to host an active galactic nucleus (AGN) and have nuclear star formation. Our main goal is to investigate whether the molecules responsible for the 11.3$\mu$m polyclyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) feature are destroyed in the close vicinity of an AGN. We detect 11.3$\mu$m PAH feature emission in the nuclear regions of the galaxies as well as extended PAH emission over a few hundred parsecs. The equivalent width (EW) of the feature shows a minimum at the nucleus but increases with increasing radial distances, reaching typical star-forming values a few hundred parsecs away from the nucleus. The reduced nuclear EW are interpreted as due to increased dilution from the AGN continuum rather than destruction of the PAH molecules. We conclude that at least those molecules responsible for the 11.3$\mu$m PAH feature survive in the nuclear environments as close as 10pc from the AGN and for Seyfert-like AGN luminosities. We propose that material in the dusty tori, nuclear gas disks, and/or host galaxies of AGN is likely to provide the column densities necessary to protect the PAH molecules from the AGN radiation field.
  • We present the wavelength and spectral resolution characterisation of the Integral Field Unit (IFU) Medium Resolution Spectrometer for the Mid-InfraRed Instrument (MIRI), to fly onboard the James Webb Space Telescope in 2014. We use data collected using the Verification Model of the instrument and develop an empirical method to calibrate properties such as wavelength range and resolving power in a portion of the spectrometer's full spectral range (5-28 microns). We test our results against optical models to verify the system requirements and combine them with a study of the fringing pattern in the instrument's detector to provide a more accurate calibration. We show that MIRI's IFU spectrometer will be able to produce spectra with a resolving power above R=2800 in the wavelength range 6.46-7.70 microns, and that the unresolved spectral lines are well fitted by a Gaussian profile.
  • We present results on low-resolution mid-infrared (MIR) spectra of 70 infrared-luminous galaxies obtained with the Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) onboard Spitzer. We selected sources from the European Large Area Infrared Survey (ELAIS) with S15 > 0.8 mJy and photometric or spectroscopic z > 1. About half of the sample are QSOs in the optical, while the remaining sources are galaxies, comprising both obscured AGN and starbursts. We classify the spectra using well-known infrared diagnostics, as well as a new one that we propose, into three types of source: those dominated by an unobscured AGN (QSOs), obscured AGN, and starburst-dominated sources. Starbursts concentrate at z ~ 0.6-1.0 favored by the shift of the 7.7-micron PAH band into the selection 15 micron band, while AGN spread over the 0.5 < z < 3.1 range. Star formation rates (SFR) are estimated for individual sources from the luminosity of the PAH features. An estimate of the average PAH luminosity in QSOs and obscured AGN is obtained from the composite spectrum of all sources with reliable redshifts. The estimated mean SFR in the QSOs is 50-100 Mo yr^-1, but the implied FIR luminosity is 3-10 times lower than that obtained from stacking analysis of the FIR photometry, suggesting destruction of the PAH carriers by energetic photons from the AGN. The SFR estimated in obscured AGN is 2-3 times higher than in QSOs of similar MIR luminosity. This discrepancy might not be due to luminosity effects or selection bias alone, but could instead indicate a connection between obscuration and star formation. However, the observed correlation between silicate absorption and the slope of the near- to mid-infrared spectrum is compatible with the obscuration of the AGN emission in these sources being produced in a dust torus.
  • We derive the properties of dusty tori in Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) from the comparison of observed Spectral Energy Distributions (SEDs) of SDSS quasars and a precomputed grid of torus models. The observed SEDs comprise SDSS photometry, 2MASS J, H, and K data, whenever available and mid-Infrared (MIR) data from the Spitzer Wide-area InfraRed Extragalactic (SWIRE) Survey. The adopted model is that of Fritz et al., 2006. The fit is performed by standard chi^2 minimisation, the model however can be multi-component comprising a stellar and a starburst components, whenever necessary. Models with low equatorial optical depth, tau_9.7, were allowed as well as ``traditional'' models with tau_9.7 > 1.0, corresponding to A_V > 22 and the results were compared. Fits using high optical depth tori models only produced dust more compactly distributed than in the configuration where all tau_9.7 models were permitted. Tori with decreasing dust density with the distance from the centre were favoured while there was no clear preference for models with or without angular variation of the dust density. The computed outer radii of the tori are of some tens of parsecs large but can reach, in a few cases, a few hundreds of parsecs. The mass of dust, M_Dust, and infrared luminosity, L_IR, integrated in the wavelength range between 1 and 1000 micron, do not show significant variations with redshift, once the observational biases are taken into account. Objects with 70 micron detections, representing 25% of the sample, are studied separately and the starburst contribution (whenever present) to the IR luminosity can reach, in the most extreme but very few cases, 80%.
  • We report results from a Spitzer GO-1 program of IRS spectroscopy of a large sample of Luminous Infrared Galaxies and quasars selected from the European Large Area ISO Survey (ELAIS) which have a wide multiwavelength coverage, including ISOCAM, ISOPHOT, IRAC and MIPS (from SWIRE), and optical photometry. We present the sample selection and results from the IRS spectroscopy.
  • This work focuses on the properties of dusty tori in active galactic nuclei (AGN) derived from the comparison of SDSS type 1 quasars with mid-Infrared (MIR) counterparts and a new, detailed torus model. The infrared data were taken by the Spitzer Wide-area InfraRed Extragalactic (SWIRE) Survey. Basic model parameters are constraint, such as the density law of the graphite and silicate grains, the torus size and its opening angle. A whole variety of optical depths is supported. The favoured models are those with decreasing density with distance from the centre, while there is no clear tendency as to the covering factor, ie small, medium and large covering factors are almost equally distributed. Based on the models that better describe the observed SEDs, properties such as the accretion luminosity, the mass of dust, the inner to outer radius ratio and the hydrogen column density are computed.
  • We present results of a morphological analysis of a small subset of the Spitzer Wide-area InfraRed Extragalactic survey (SWIRE) galaxy population. The analysis is based on public ACS data taken inside the SWIRE N1 field, which are the deepest optical high-resolution imaging available within the SWIRE fields as of today. Our reference sample includes 156 galaxies detected by both ACS and SWIRE. Among the various galaxy morphologies, we disentangle two main classes, spheroids (or bulge-dominated galaxies) and disk-dominated ones, for which we compute the number counts as a function of flux. We then limit our sample to objects with IRAC fluxes brighter than 10 microJy, estimated ~90% completeness limit of the SWIRE catalogues, and compare the observed counts to model predictions. We find that the observed counts of the spheroidal population agree with the expectations of a hierarchical model while a monolithic scenario predicts steeper counts. Both scenaria, however, under-predict the number of late-type galaxies. These observations show that the large majority (close to 80 per cent) of the 3.6 and 4.5 micron galaxy population, even at these moderately faint fluxes, is dominated by spiral and irregular galaxies or mergers.
  • We present a mid-infrared analysis of 35 quasars with spectroscopic redshifts selected from the Spitzer Wide-area InfraRed Extragalactic Survey (SWIRE). We discuss their optical and mid-infrared (MIR) colors, and show that these quasars occupy well defined regions in MIR color-color space. We examine the issue of type-I AGN candidate selection in detail and propose new selection methods based on mid-IR colors. The available multi-band data allows us to construct two new, well-sampled quasar templates, covering wavelengths from the ultraviolet to the MIR.