• Graphite is a model system for the study of three-dimensional electrons and holes in the magnetic quantum limit, in which the charges are confined to the lowest Landau levels. We report magneto-transport measurements in pulsed magnetic fields up to 60 T, which resolve the collapse of two density wave states in two, electron and hole, Landau levels at 52.3 and 54.2 T respectively. We report evidence for a commensurate density wave at 47.1 T in the electron Landau level. The theoretical modelling of these results predicts that the ultra-quantum limit is entered above 73.5 T. This state is an insulator, and we discuss its correspondence to the "metallic" state reported earlier. We propose that this (interaction-induced) insulating phase supports surface states that carry no charge or spin within the planes, but does however support charge transport out of plane.
  • Superconducting spintronics has emerged in the last decade as a promising new field that seeks to open a new dimension for nanoelectronics by utilizing the internal spin structure of the superconducting Cooper pair as a new degree of freedom. Its basic building blocks are spin-triplet Cooper pairs with equally aligned spins, which are promoted by proximity of a conventional superconductor to a ferromagnetic material with inhomogeneous macroscopic magnetization. Using low-energy muon spin rotation experiments, we find an entirely unexpected novel effect: the appearance of a magnetization in a thin layer of a non-magnetic metal (gold), separated from a ferromagnetic double layer by a 50 nm thick superconducting layer of Nb. The effect can be controlled by either temperature or by using a magnetic field to control the state of the remote ferromagnetic elements and may act as a basic building block for a new generation of quantum interference devices based on the spin of a Cooper pair.
  • In this technical note we address the problem of achieving consensus in a network of homogeneous nonlinear systems. The communication network is supposed to be switching within a finite set of topologies which may be disconnected for finite time intervals. We prove that if the length of the time intervals in which connected topologies are active satisfy an average dwell-time condition consensus is achieved. Lyapunov arguments proposed in the field of hybrid nonlinear systems are adopted to prove the result.
  • In this paper, we consider the output synchronization problem for a network of heterogeneous diffusively-coupled nonlinear agents. Specifically, we show how the (non-identical) agents can be controlled in such a way that their outputs asymptotically track the output of a prescribed nonlinear exosystem. The problem is solved in two steps. In the first step, the problem of achieving consensus among (identical) nonlinear reference generators is addressed. In this respect, it is shown how the techniques recently developed to solve the consensus problem among linear agents can be extended to agents modeled by nonlinear d-dimensional differential equations, under the assumption that the communication graph is connected. In the second step, the theory of nonlinear output regulation is applied in a decentralized control mode, to force the output of each agent of the network to robustly track the (synchronized) output of a local reference model.
  • We extend the rotationally invariant formulation of the slave-boson method to superconducting states. This generalization, building on the recent work by Lechermann et al. [Phys. Rev. B {\bf 76}, 155102 (2007)], allows to study superconductivity in strongly correlated systems. We apply the formalism to a specific case of strongly correlated superconductivity, as that found in a multi-orbital Hubbard model for alkali-doped fullerides, where the superconducting pairing has phonic origin, yet it has been shown to be favored by strong correlation owing to the symmetry of the interaction. The method allows to treat on the same footing the strong correlation effects and the interorbital interactions driving superconductivity, and to capture the physics of strongly correlated superconductivity, in which the proximity to a Mott transition favors the superconducting phenomenon.
  • We compare the accuracy of two cluster extensions of Dynamical Mean-Field Theory in describing d-wave superconductors, using as a reference model a saddle-point t-J model which can be solved exactly in the thermodynamic limit and at the same time reasonably describes the properties of high-temperature superconductors. The two methods are Cellular Dynamical Mean-Field Theory, which is based on a real-space perspective, and Dynamical Cluster Approximation, which enforces a momentum-space picture by imposing periodic boundary conditions on the cluster, as opposed to the open boundary conditions of the first method. We consider the scaling of the methods for large cluster size, but we also focus on the behavior for small clusters, such as those accessible by means of present techniques, with particular emphasis on the geometrical structure, which is definitely a relevant issue in small clusters.
  • In this paper we present a general tool to handle the presence of zero dynamics which are asymptotically but not locally exponentially stable in problems of robust nonlinear stabilization by output feedback. We show how it is possible to design locally Lipschitz stabilizers under conditions which only rely upon a partial detectability assumption on the controlled plant, by obtaining a robust stabilizing paradigm which is not based on design of observers and separation principles. The main design idea comes from recent achievements in the field of output regulation and specifically in the design of nonlinear internal models.
  • In this paper we show how nonlinear internal models can be effectively used in the design of output regulators for nonlinear systems. This result provides a significant enhancement of the non-equilibrium theory for output regulation, which we have presented in the recent paper entitled "Limit Sets, Zero Dynamics, and Internal Models in the Problem of Nonlinear Output Regulation".