• We present high-resolution echelle spectroscopic observations of the two near- infrared (NIR) Diffuse Interstellar Bands (DIBs) at 13175 A and 11797.5 A. The DIBs have been observed in a number of diffuse interstellar medium sightlines that exhibit a wide range of visual extinctions. Band profiles are similar to those seen in narrow DIBs, clearly asymmetric and can be closely fitted in most cases using two simple Gaussian components. Gaussian fits were generally found to be more successful than fits based on a multiple-cloud model using a template DIB profile. For a sample of 9 objects in which both bands are observed, the strength of both NIR DIBs generally increases with A(V), and we report a correlation between the two observed bands over a large A(V) range and widely-separated lines of sight. The strength of the two bands is also compared against those of two visual DIBs and the diffuse ISM aliphatic dust absorption feature at 3.4 microns previously detected in the same sightlines. We find that the NIR DIBs do not exhibit notable (anti)correlations with either. Implications of these observations on possible DIB carrier species are discussed.
  • Aims. We demonstrate the feasibility of determining parallaxes for nearby objects with theWide Field Camera on the United Kingdom Infrared Telescope (UKIRT) using the UKIRT Infrared Deep Sky Survey as a first epoch. We determine physical parameters for ULAS J003402.77-005206.7, one of the coolest brown dwarfs currently known, using atmospheric and evolutionary models with the distance found here. Methods. Observations over the period 10/2005 to 07/2009 were pipeline processed at the Cambridge Astronomical Survey Unit and combined to produce a parallax and proper motion using standard procedures. Results. We determined pi = 79.6 +/- 3.8 mas, mura = -20.0 +/- 3.7 mas/yr and mudec = -363.8 +/- 4.3 mas/yr for ULAS J003402.77-005206.7. Conclusions. We have made a direct parallax determination for one of the coolest objects outside of the solar system. The distance is consistent with a relatively young, 1 - 2 Gyr, low mass, 13 - 20 MJ, cool, 550-600K, brown dwarf. We present a measurement of the radial velocity that is consistent with an age between 0.5 and 4.0 Gyr.
  • It is thought that the first generations of massive stars in the Universe were an important, and quite possibly dominant, source of the ultra-violet radiation that reionized the hydrogen gas in the intergalactic medium (IGM); a state in which it has remained to the present day. Measurements of cosmic microwave background anisotropies suggest that this phase-change largely took place in the redshift range z=10.8 +/- 1.4, while observations of quasars and Lyman-alpha galaxies have shown that the process was essentially completed by z=6. However, the detailed history of reionization, and characteristics of the stars and proto-galaxies that drove it, remain unknown. Further progress in understanding requires direct observations of the sources of ultra-violet radiation in the era of reionization, and mapping the evolution of the neutral hydrogen fraction through time. The detection of galaxies at such redshifts is highly challenging, due to their intrinsic faintness and high luminosity distance, whilst bright quasars appear to be rare beyond z~7. Here we report the discovery of a gamma-ray burst, GRB 090423, at redshift z=8.26 -0.08 +0.07. This is well beyond the redshift of the most distant spectroscopically confirmed galaxy (z=6.96) and quasar (z=6.43). It establishes that massive stars were being produced, and dying as GRBs, ~625 million years after the Big Bang. In addition, the accurate position of the burst pinpoints the location of the most distant galaxy known to date. Larger samples of GRBs beyond z~7 will constrain the evolving rate of star formation in the early universe, while rapid spectroscopy of their afterglows will allow direct exploration of the progress of reionization with cosmic time.
  • (abridged) We report the discovery of a very cool brown dwarf, ULAS J003402.77-005206.7 (ULAS J0034-00), identified in UKIDSS DR1. We provide optical, near-infrared, and mid-infrared photometry of the source, and two near-infrared spectra. Comparing the spectral energy distribution of ULAS J0034-00 to that of the T8 brown dwarf 2MASS J0415-09, the latest-type and coolest well-studied brown dwarf to date, with Teff~750 K, we find evidence that ULAS J0034-00 is significantly cooler. First, the measured values of the near-infrared absorption spectral indices imply a later classification, of T8.5. Second, the H-[4.49] colour provides an empirical estimate of the temperature of 540<Teff<660 K (+/-2sig range). Third, the J- and H-band peaks are somewhat narrower in ULAS J0034-00, and detailed comparison against spectral models calibrated to 2MASS J0415-09 yields an estimated temperature lower by 60-120 K relative to 2MASS J0415-09 i.e. 630<Teff<690 K (+/-2sig), and lower gravity or higher metallicity according to the degenerate combination -0.5<delta(log g-2[m/H])<-0.25 (+/-2sig). Combining these estimates, and considering systematics, it is likely the temperature lies in the range 600<Teff<700 K. Despite the low inferred Teff we find no evidence for strong absorption by NH3 over the wavelength range 1.51-1.56 um. Evolutionary models imply that the mass and age are in the ranges 15-36 M(Jup) and 0.5-8 Gyr, respectively. The measured proper motion, of (0.37+/-0.07)arcsec/yr, combined with the photometrically estimated distance of 14-22 pc, implies a tangential velocity of ~30 km/s. ULAS J0034-00 is significantly bluer than 2MASS J0415-09 in Y-J, so future searches should allow for the possibility that cooler T dwarfs are bluer still.
  • The First Data Release (DR1) of the UKIRT Infrared Deep Sky Survey (UKIDSS) took place on 2006 July 21. UKIDSS is a set of five large near-infrared surveys, covering a complementary range of areas, depths, and Galactic latitudes. DR1 is the first large release of survey-quality data from UKIDSS and includes 320 sq degs of multicolour data to (Vega) K=18, complete (depending on the survey) in three to five bands from the set ZYJHK, together with 4 sq degs of deep JK data to an average depth K=21. In addition the release includes a similar quantity of data with incomplete filter coverage. In JHK, in regions of low extinction, the photometric uniformity of the calibration is better than 0.02 mag. in each band. The accuracy of the calibration in ZY remains to be quantified, and the same is true of JHK in regions of high extinction. The median image FWHM across the dataset is 0.82 arcsec. We describe changes since the Early Data Release in the implementation, pipeline and calibration, quality control, and archive procedures. We provide maps of the areas surveyed, and summarise the contents of each of the five surveys in terms of filters, areas, and depths. DR1 marks completion of 7 per cent of the UKIDSS 7-year goals.
  • The UKIRT Infrared Deep Sky Survey (UKIDSS) is a set of five large near-infrared surveys, covering a complementary range of areas, depths, and Galactic latitudes. The UKIDSS Second Data Release (DR2) includes the First Data Release (DR1), with minor improvements, plus new data for the LAS, GPS, GCS, and DXS, from observations made over 2006 May through July (when the UDS was unobservable). DR2 was staged in two parts. The first part excluded the GPS, and took place on 2007 March 1. The GPS was released on 2007 April 12. DR2 includes 282 sq. degs of multicolour data to (Vega) K=18, complete in the full YJHK set for the LAS, 57 sq. degs in the ZYJHK set for the GCS, and 236 sq. degs in the JHK set for the GPS. DR2 includes nearly 7 sq. degs of deep JK data (DXS, UDS) to an average depth K=21. In addition the release includes a comparable quantity of data where coverage of the filter set for any survey is incomplete. We document changes that have occurred since DR1 to the pipeline, calibration, and archive procedures. The two most noteworthy changes are presentation of the data in a single database (compared to two previously), and provision of additional error flags for detected sources, flagging potentially spurious artifacts, corrupted data and suspected cross-talk sources. We summarise the contents of each of the surveys in terms of filters, areas, and depths.
  • JHK photometry in the Mauna Kea Observatory (MKO) near-IR system is presented for 115 stars. Of these, 79 are UKIRT standards and 42 are LCO standards. The average brightness is 11.5 mag, with a range of 10 to 15. The average number of nights each star was observed is 4, and the average of the internal error of the final results is 0.011 mag. These JHK data agree with those reported by other groups to 0.02 mag. The measurements are used to derive transformations between the MKO JHK photometric system and the UKIRT, LCO and 2MASS systems. The 2MASS-MKO data scatter by 0.05 mag for redder stars: 2MASS-J includes H2O features in dwarfs and MKO-K includes CO features in giants. Transformations derived for stars whose spectra contain only weak features cannot give accurate transformations for objects with strong absorption features within a filter bandpasses. We find evidence of systematic effects at the 0.02 mag level in the photometry of stars with J<11 and H,K<10.5. This is due to an underestimate of the linearity correction for stars observed with the shortest exposure times; very accurate photometry of stars approaching the saturation limits of infrared detectors which are operated in double-read mode is difficult to obtain. Four stars in the sample, GSPC S705-D, FS 116 (B216-b7), FS 144 (Ser-EC84) and FS 32 (Feige 108), may be variable. 84 stars in the sample have 11< J< 15 and 10.5<H,K<15, are not suspected to be variable, and have magnitudes with an estimated error <0.027 mag; 79 of these have an error of <0.020 mag. These represent the first published high-accuracy JHK stellar photometry in the MKO photometric system; we recommend these objects be employed as primary standards for that system [abridged].
  • This paper defines the UKIRT Infrared Deep Sky Survey (UKIDSS) Early Data Release (EDR). UKIDSS is a set of five large near-infra-red surveys defined by Lawrence et al. (2006), being undertaken with the UK Infra-red Telescope (UKIRT) Wide Field Camera (WFCAM). The programme began in May 2005 and has an expected duration of seven years. Each survey uses some or all of the broadband filter complement ZYJHK. The EDR is the first public release of data to the European Southern Observatory (ESO) community. All worldwide releases occur after a delay of 18 months from the ESO release. The EDR provides a small sample dataset, ~50 sq.deg (about 1% of the whole of UKIDSS), that is a lower limit to the expected quality of future survey data releases. In addition, an EDR+ dataset contains all EDR data plus extra data of similar quality, but for areas not observed in all of the required filters (amounting to ~220 sq.deg). The first large data release, DR1, will occur in mid-2006. We provide details of the observational implementation, the data reduction, the astrometric and photometric calibration, and the quality control procedures. We summarise the data coverage and quality (seeing, ellipticity, photometricity, depth) for each survey and give a brief guide to accessing the images and catalogues from the WFCAM Science Archive.
  • We present L'and M' photometry, obtained at UKIRT using the Mauna Kea Observatories Near-IR filter set, for 46 and 31 standard stars, respectively. The L' standards include 25 from the UKIRT in-house "Bright Standards" with magnitudes deriving from Elias et al. (1982) and observations at the IRTF in the early 1980s, and 21 fainter stars. The M' magnitudes derive from the results of Sinton & Tittemore (1984). We estimate the average external error to be 0.015 mag for the bright L' standards and 0.025 mag for the fainter L' standards, and 0.026 mag for the M' standards. The new results provide a network of homogeneously observed standards, and establish reference stars for the MKO system, in these bands. They also extend the available standards to magnitudes which should be faint enough to be accessible for observations with modern detectors on large and very large telescopes.