• We report that in a $\beta$-Mn-type chiral magnet Co$_9$Zn$_9$Mn$_2$, skyrmions are realized as a metastable state over a wide temperature range, including room temperature, via field-cooling through the thermodynamic equilibrium skyrmion phase that exists below a transition temperature $T_\mathrm{c}$ $\sim$ 400 K. The once-created metastable skyrmions survive at zero magnetic field both at and above room temperature. Such robust skyrmions in a wide temperature and magnetic field region demonstrate the key role of topology, and provide a significant step toward technological applications of skyrmions in bulk chiral magnets.
  • We use resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) at the Cu L$_3$ edge to measure the charge and spin excitations in the "half-stuffed" Cu--O planes of the cuprate antiferromagnet Ba$_2$Cu$_3$O$_4$Cl$_2$. The RIXS line shape reveals distinct contributions to the $dd$ excitations from the two structurally inequivalent Cu sites, which have different out-of-plane coordinations. The low-energy response exhibits magnetic excitations. We find a spin-wave branch whose dispersion follows the symmetry of a CuO$_2$ sublattice, similar to the case of the "fully-stuffed" planes of tetragonal CuO (T-CuO). Its bandwidth is closer to that of a typical cuprate material, such as Sr$_2$CuO$_2$Cl$_2$, than it is to that of T-CuO. We interpret this result as arising from the absence of the effective four-spin inter-sublattice interactions that act to reduce the bandwidth in T-CuO.
  • We report detailed neutron scattering studies on Ba$_2$Cu$_3$O$_4$Cl$_2$. The compound consists of two interpenetrating sublattices of Cu, labeled as Cu$_{\rm A}$ and Cu$_{\rm B}$, each of which forms a square-lattice Heisenberg antiferromagnet. The two sublattices order at different temperatures and effective exchange couplings within the sublattices differ by an order of magnitude. This yields an inelastic neutron spectrum of the Cu$_{\rm A}$ sublattice extending up to 300 meV and a much weaker dispersion of Cu$_{\rm B}$ going up to around 20 meV. Using a single-band Hubbard model we derive an effective spin Hamiltonian. From this, we find that linear spin-wave theory gives a good description to the magnetic spectrum. In addition, a magnetic field of 10 T is found to produce effects on the Cu$_{\rm B}$ dispersion that cannot be explained by conventional spin-wave theory.
  • The correlation between magnetic properties and microscopic structural aspects in the diluted magnetic semiconductor Ge$_{1-x}$Mn$_{x}$Te is investigated by x-ray diffraction and magnetization as a function of the Mn concentration $x$. The occurrence of high ferromagnetic-transition temperatures in the rhombohedrally distorted phase of slowly-cooled Ge$_{1-x}$Mn$_{x}$Te is shown to be directly correlated with the formation and coexistence of strongly-distorted Mn-poor and weakly-distorted Mn-rich regions. It is demonstrated that the weakly-distorted phase fraction is responsible for the occurrence of high-transition temperatures in Ge$_{1-x}$Mn$_{x}$Te. When the Mn concentration becomes larger, the Mn-rich regions start to switch into the undistorted cubic structure, and the transition temperature is suppressed concurrently. By identifying suitable annealing conditions, we successfully increased the transition temperature to above 200 K for Mn concentrations close to the cubic phase. Structural data indicate that the weakly-distorted phase fraction can be restored at the expense of the cubic regions upon the enhancement of the transition temperature, clearly establishing the direct link between high-transition temperatures and the weakly-distorted Mn-rich phase fraction.
  • Chirality of matter can produce unique responses in optics, electricity and magnetism. In particular, magnetic crystals transmit their handedness to the magnetism via antisymmetric exchange interaction of relativistic origin, producing helical spin orders as well as their fluctuations. Here we report for a chiral magnet MnSi that chiral spin fluctuations manifest themselves in the electrical magnetochiral effect (eMChE), i.e. the nonreciprocal and nonlinear response characterized by the electrical conductance depending on inner product of electric and magnetic fields $\boldsymbol{E} \cdot \boldsymbol{B}$. Prominent eMChE signals emerge at specific temperature-magnetic field-pressure regions: in the paramagnetic phase just above the helical ordering temperature and in the partially-ordered topological spin state at low temperatures and high pressures, where thermal and quantum spin fluctuations are conspicuous in proximity of classical and quantum phase transitions, respectively. The finding of the asymmetric electron scattering by chiral spin fluctuations may explore new electromagnetic functionality in chiral magnets.
  • Skyrmions, topologically-protected nanometric spin vortices, are being investigated extensively in various magnets. Among them, many of structurally-chiral cubic magnets host the triangular-lattice skyrmion crystal (SkX) as the thermodynamic equilibrium state. However, this state exists only in a narrow temperature and magnetic-field region just below the magnetic transition temperature $T_\mathrm{c}$, while a helical or conical magnetic state prevails at lower temperatures. Here we describe that for a room-temperature skyrmion material, $\beta$-Mn-type Co$_8$Zn$_8$Mn$_4$, a field-cooling via the equilibrium SkX state can suppress the transition to the helical or conical state, instead realizing robust metastable SkX states that survive over a very wide temperature and magnetic-field region, including down to zero temperature and up to the critical magnetic field of the ferromagnetic transition. Furthermore, the lattice form of the metastable SkX is found to undergo reversible transitions between a conventional triangular lattice and a novel square lattice upon varying the temperature and magnetic field. These findings exemplify the topological robustness of the once-created skyrmions, and establish metastable skyrmion phases as a fertile ground for technological applications.
  • Cross-control of a material property - manipulation of a physical quantity (e.g., magnetisation) by a nonconjugate field (e.g., electrical field) - is a challenge in fundamental science and also important for technological device applications. It has been demonstrated that magnetic properties can be controlled by electrical and optical stimuli in various magnets. Here we find that heat-treatment allows the control over two competing magnetic phases in the Mn-doped polar semiconductor GeTe. The onset temperatures $T_{\rm c}$ of ferromagnetism vary at low Mn concentrations by a factor of five to six with a maximum $T_{\rm c} \approx 180$ K, depending on the selected phase. Analyses in terms of synchrotron x-ray diffraction and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy indicate a possible segregation of the Mn ions, which is responsible for the high-$T_{\rm c}$ phase. More importantly, we demonstrate that the two states can be switched back and forth repeatedly from either phase by changing the heat-treatment of a sample, thereby confirming magnetic phase-change- memory functionality.
  • Topologically stable matters can have a long lifetime, even if thermodynamically costly, when the thermal agitation is sufficiently low. A magnetic skyrmion lattice (SkL) represents a unique form of long-range magnetic order that is topologically stable, and therefore, a long-lived, metastable SkL can form. Experimental observations of the SkL in bulk crystals, however, have mostly been limited to a finite and narrow temperature region in which the SkL is thermodynamically stable; thus, the benefits of the topological stability remain unclear. Here, we report a metastable SkL created by quenching a thermodynamically stable SkL. Hall-resistivity measurements of MnSi reveal that, although the metastable SkL is short-lived at high temperatures, the lifetime becomes prolonged (>> 1 week) at low temperatures. The manipulation of a delicate balance between thermal agitation and the topological stability enables a deterministic creation/annihilation of the metastable SkL by exploiting electric heating and subsequent rapid cooling, thus establishing a facile method to control the formation of a SkL.
  • We investigate skyrmion formation in both a single crystalline bulk and epitaxial thin films of MnSi by measurements of planar Hall effect. A prominent stepwise field profile of planar Hall effect is observed in the well-established skyrmion phase region in the bulk sample, which is assigned to anisotropic magnetoresistance effect with respect to the magnetic modulation direction. We also detect the characteristic planar Hall anomalies in the thin films under the in-plane magnetic field at low temperatures, which indicates the formation of skyrmion strings lying in the film plane. Uniaxial magnetic anisotropy plays an important role in stabilizing the in-plane skyrmions in the MnSi thin film.
  • We present a study on the modification of the electronic structure and hole-doping effect for the layered dichalcogenide WSe_2 with a multi-valley band structure, where Ta is doped on the W site along with a partial substitution of Te for its lighter counterpart Se. By means of band-structure calculations and specific-heat measurements, the introduction of Te is theoretically and experimentally found to change the electronic states in WSe_2. While in WSe_2 the valence-band maximum is located at the Gamma point, the introduction of Te raises the bands at the K point with respect to the Gamma point. In addition, thermal-transport measurements reveal a smaller thermal conductivity at room temperature of W_1-xTa_xSe_1.6Te_0.4 than reported for W_1-xTa_xSe_2. However, when approaching 900 K, the thermal conductivities of both systems converge while the resistivity in W_1-xTa_xSe_1.6Te_0.4 is larger than in W_1-xTa_xSe_2, leading to comparable but slightly smaller values of the figure of merit in W_1-xTa_xSe_1.6Te_0.4.
  • Circular dichroism in the angular distribution (CDAD) of photoelectrons from SrTiO3:Nb and CuxBi2Se3 is investigated by 7-eV laser ARPES. In addition to the well-known node that occurs in CDAD when the incidence plane matches the mirror plane of the crystal, we show that another type of node occurs when the mirror plane of the crystal is vertical to the incidence plane and the electronic state is two dimensional. The flower-shaped CDAD's occurring around the Fermi level of SrTiO3:Nb and around the Dirac point of CuxBi2Se3 are explained on equal footings. We point out that the penetration depth of the topological states of CuxBi2Se3 depends on momentum.
  • Resonant soft x-ray Bragg diffraction at the Dy M$_{4,5}$ edges has been used to study Dy multipoles in the combined magnetic and orbitally ordered phase of DyB$_2$C$_2$. The analysis incorporates both the intra-atomic magnetic and quadrupolar interactions between the 3d core and 4f valence shells. Additionally, we introduce to the formalism the interference of magnetic and nonmagnetic oscillators. This allows a determination of the higher order multipole moments of rank 1 (dipole) to 6 (hexacontatetrapole). The strength of the Dy 4f multipole moments have been estimated at being between 7 and 78 % of the quadrupolar moment.
  • Magnetic systems are fertile ground for the emergence of exotic states when the magnetic interactions cannot be satisfied simultaneously due to the topology of the lattice - a situation known as geometrical frustration. Spinels, AB2O4, can realize the most highly frustrated network of corner-sharing tetrahedra. Several novel states have been discovered in spinels, such as composite spin clusters and novel charge-ordered states. Here we use neutron and synchrotron X-ray scattering to characterize the fractional magnetization state of HgCr2O4 under an external magnetic field, H. When the field is applied in its Neel ground state, a phase transition occurs at H ~ 10 Tesla at which each tetrahedron changes from a canted Neel state to a fractional spin state with the total spin, Stet, of S/2 and the lattice undergoes orthorhombic to cubic symmetry change. Our results provide the microscopic one-to-one correspondence between the spin state and the lattice distortion.
  • Resonant soft x-ray Bragg diffraction at the Tb M4,5 edges and non resonant Bragg diffraction have been used to investigate orbitals in TbB2C2. The Tb 4f quadrupole moments are ordered in zero field below T_N and show a ferroquadrupolar alignment dictated by the antiferromagnetic order. With increasing applied field along [110] the Tb 4f magnetic dipole moments rotate in a gradual manner toward the field. The quadrupole moment is rigidly coupled to the magnetic moment and follows this field-induced rotation. The quadrupolar pair interaction is found to depend on the specific orientation of the orbitals as predicted theoretically and can be manipulated with an applied magnetic field.
  • We investigate the electronic structure of high-quality single-crystal LaNiO$_3$ (LNO) thin films using in situ photoemission spectroscopy (PES). The in situ high-resolution soft x-ray PES measurements on epitaxial thin films reveal the intrinsic electronic structure of LNO. We find a new sharp feature in the PES spectra crossing the Fermi level, which is derived from the correlated Ni 3$d$ $e_g$ electrons. This feature shows significant enhancement of spectral weight with decreasing temperature. From a detailed analysis of resistivity data, the enhancement of spectral weight is attributed to increasing electron correlations due to antiferromagnetic fluctuations.
  • Resonant soft x-ray Bragg diffraction at the Dy M4,5 edges has been exploited to study Dy multipole motifs in DyB2C2. Our results are explained introducing the intra-atomic quadrupolar interaction between the core 3d and valence 4f shell. This allows us to determine for the first time higher order multipole moments of dysprosium $4f$ electrons and to draw their precise charge density. The Dy hexadecapole and hexacontatetrapole moment have been estimated at -20% and +30% of the quadrupolar moment, respectively. No evidence for the lock-in of the orbitals at T_N has been observed, in contrast to earlier suggestions. The multipolar interaction and the structural transition cooperate along c but they compete in the basal plane explaining the canted structure along [110].