• Most quantum-error correcting codes assume that the decoherence of each physical qubit is independent of the decoherence of any other physical qubit. We can test the validity of this assumption in an experimental setup where a microwave feedline couples to multiple qubits by examining correlations between the qubits. Here, we investigate the correlations between fluxonium qubits located in a single waveguide. Despite being in a wide-bandwidth electromagnetic environment, the qubits have measured relaxation times in excess of 100 us. We use cascaded Josephson parametric amplifiers to measure the quantum jumps of two fluxonium qubits simultaneously. No correlations are observed between the relaxation times of the two fluxonium qubits, which indicates that the sources of relaxation are local to each qubit. Our architecture can easily be scaled to monitor larger numbers of qubits.
  • Engineered quantum systems allow us to observe phenomena that are not easily accessible naturally. The LEGO-like nature of superconducting circuits makes them particularly suited for building and coupling artificial atoms. Here, we introduce an artificial molecule, composed of two strongly coupled fluxonium atoms, which possesses a tunable magnetic moment. Using an applied external flux, one can tune the molecule between two regimes: one in which the ground-excited state manifold has a magnetic dipole moment and one in which the ground-excited state manifold has only a magnetic quadrupole moment. By varying the applied external flux, we find the coherence of the molecule to be limited by local flux noise. The ability to engineer and control artificial molecules paves the way for building more complex circuits for protected qubits and quantum simulation.
  • We present a method for calculating the energy levels of superconducting circuits that contain highly anharmonic, inductively-shunted modes with arbitrarily strong coupling. Our method starts by calculating the normal modes of the linearized circuit and proceeds with numerical diagonalization in this basis. As an example, we analyze the Hamiltonian of a fluxonium qubit inductively coupled to a readout resonator. While elementary, this simple example is nontrivial because it cannot be efficiently treated by the method known as "black-box quantization," numerical diagonalization in the bare harmonic oscillator basis, or perturbation theory. Calculated spectra are compared to measured spectroscopy data, demonstrating excellent quantitative agreement between theory and experiment.
  • We report measurements of resistance oscillations in micron-scale antidots in both the integer and fractional quantum Hall regimes. In the integer regime, we conclude that oscillations are of the Coulomb type from the scaling of magnetic field period with the number of edges bound to the antidot. Based on both gate-voltage and field periods, we find at filling factor {\nu} = 2 a tunneling charge of e and two charged edges. Generalizing this picture to the fractional regime, we find (again, based on field and gate-voltage periods) at {\nu} = 2/3 a tunneling charge of (2/3)e and a single charged edge.
  • We investigate dynamic nuclear polarization in quantum point contacts (QPCs) in the integer and fractional quantum Hall regimes. Following the application of a dc bias, fractional plateaus in the QPC shift symmetrically about half filling of the lowest Landau level, \nu=1/2, suggesting an interpretation in terms of composite fermions. Polarizing and detecting at different filling factors indicates that Zeeman energy is reduced by the induced nuclear polarization. Mapping effects from integer to fractional regimes extends the composite fermion picture to include hyperfine coupling.