• Thanks to extensive observations with X-ray missions and facilities working in other wavelengths, as well as rapidly--advancing numerical simulations of accretion flows, our knowledge of astrophysical black holes has been remarkably enriched. Rapid progress has opened new areas of enquiry, including measurements of black hole spin, the properties and driving mechanisms of jets and disk winds, the impact of feedback into local environments, the origin of periodic and aperiodic X-ray variations, and the nature of super-Eddington accretion flows, among others. The goal of this White Paper is to illustrate how ASTRO-H can make dramatic progress in the study of astrophysical black holes, particularly the study of black hole X-ray binaries.
  • We present observations of a transient He-like Fe K alpha absorption line in Suzaku observations of the black hole binary Cygnus X-1 on 2011 October 5 near superior conjunction during the high/soft state, which enable us to map the full evolution from the start and the end of the episodic accretion phenomena or dips for the first time. We model the X-ray spectra during the event and trace their evolution. The absorption line is rather weak in the first half of the observation, but instantly deepens for ~10 ks, and weakens thereafter. The overall change in equivalent width is a factor of ~3, peaking at an orbital phase of ~0.08. This is evidence that the companion stellar wind feeding the black hole is clumpy. By analyzing the line with a Voigt profile, it is found to be consistent with a slightly redshifted Fe XXV transition, or possibly a mixture of several species less ionized than Fe XXV. The data may be explained by a clump located at a distance of ~10^(10-12) cm with a density of ~10^((-13)-(-11)) g cm^-3, which accretes onto and/or transits the line-of-sight to the black hole, causing an instant decrease in the observed degree of the ionization and/or an increase in density of the accreting matter. Continued monitoring for individual events with future X-ray calorimeter missions such as ASTRO-H and AXSIO will allow us to map out the accretion environment in detail and how it changes between the various accretion states.
  • A rapid timing analysis of VLT/ULTRACAM and RXTE observations of the black hole binary GX 339-4 in its 2007 low/hard state is presented. The optical light curves in the r', g' and u' filters show slow (~20 s) quasi-periodic variability. Upon this is superposed fast flaring activity on times approaching the best time resolution probed (~50 ms) and with maximum strengths of more than twice the local mean. Power spectral analysis over ~0.004-10 Hz is presented, and shows that although the average optical variability amplitude is lower than that in X-rays, the peak variability power emerges at a higher Fourier frequency in the optical. Energetically, we measure a large optical vs. X-ray flux ratio, higher than that seen when the source was fully jet-dominated. Such a large ratio cannot be easily explained with a disc alone. The optical:X-ray cross-spectrum shows a markedly different behaviour above and below ~0.2 Hz. The peak of the coherence function above this threshold is associated with a short optical time lag, also seen as the dominant feature in the time-domain cross-correlation at ~150 ms. The rms energy spectrum of these fast variations is best described by distinct physical components over the optical and X-ray regimes, and also suggests a maximal disc fraction of 20% at ~5000 A. If the constant time delay is due to propagation of fluctuations to (or within) the jet, this is the clearest optical evidence to date of the location of this component. The low-frequency QPO is seen in the optical but not in X-rays. Evidence of reprocessing emerges at the lowest Fourier frequencies, with optical lags at ~10 s and strong coherence in the blue u' filter. Simultaneous optical spectroscopy also shows the Bowen fluorescence blend, though its emission location is unclear. But canonical disc reprocessing cannot dominate the optical power easily, nor explain the fast variability. (abridged)
  • The wide-band Suzaku spectra of the black hole binary GX 339-4, acquired in 2007 February during the Very High state, were reanalyzed. Effects of event pileup (significant within ~ 3' of the image center) and telemetry saturation of the XIS data were carefully considered. The source was detected up to ~ 300$ keV, with an unabsorbed 0.5--200 keV luminosity of ~3.8 10^{38} erg/s at 8 kpc. The spectrum can be approximated by a power-law of photon index 2.7, with a mild soft excess and a hard X-ray hump. When using the XIS data outside 2' of the image center, the Fe-K line appeared extremely broad, suggesting a high black hole spin as already reported by Miller et al. (2008) based on the Suzaku data and other CCD data. When the XIS data accumulation is further limited to >3' to avoid event pileup, the Fe-K profile becomes narrower, and there appears a marginally better solution that suggests the inner disk radius to be 5-14 times the gravitational radius (1-sigma), though a maximally spinning black hole is still allowed by the data at the 90% confidence level. Consistently, the optically-thick accretion disk is inferred to be truncated at a radius 5-32 times the gravitational radius. Thus, the Suzaku data allow an alternative explanation without invoking a rapidly spinning black hole. This inference is further supported by the disk radius measured previously in the High/Soft state.
  • We report results from a Suzaku observation of the narrow-line Seyfert 1 NGC 4051. During our observation, large amplitude rapid variability is seen and the averaged 2--10 keV flux is 8.1x10^-12 erg s^-1 cm^-2, which is several times lower than the historical average. The X-ray spectrum hardens when the source flux becomes lower, confirming the trend of spectral variability known for many Seyfert 1 galaxies. The broad-band averaged spectrum and spectra in high and low flux intervals are analyzed. The spectra are first fitted with a model consisting of a power-law component, a reflection continuum originating in cold matter, a blackbody component, two zones of ionized absorber, and several Gaussian emission lines. The amount of reflection is rather large (R ~ 7, where R=1 corresponds to reflection by an infinite slab), while the equivalent width of the Fe-K line at 6.4 keV is modest (140 eV) for the averaged spectrum. We then model the overall spectra by introducing partial covering for the power-law component and reflection continuum independently. The column density for the former is 1x10^23 cm^-2, while it is fixed at 1x10^24 cm-2 for the latter. By comparing the spectra in different flux states, we identify the causes of spectral variability. (abridged)
  • The Hard X-ray Detector (HXD) on board Suzaku covers a wide energy range from 10 keV to 600 keV by combination of silicon PIN diodes and GSO scintillators. The HXD is designed to achieve an extremely low in-orbit back ground based on a combination of new techniques, including the concept of well-type active shield counter. With an effective area of 142 cm^2 at 20 keV and 273 cm2 at 150 keV, the background level at the sea level reached ~1x10^{-5} cts s^{-1} cm^{-2} keV^{-1} at 30 keV for the PI N diodes, and ~2x10^{-5} cts s^{-1} cm^{-2} keV^{-1} at 100 keV, and ~7x10^{-6} cts s^{-1} cm^{-2} keV^{-1} at 200 keV for the phoswich counter. Tight active shielding of the HXD results in a large array of guard counters surrounding the main detector parts. These anti-coincidence counters, made of ~4 cm thick BGO crystals, have a large effective area for sub-MeV to MeV gamma-rays. They work as an excellent gamma-ray burst monitor with limited angular resolution (~5 degree). The on-board signal-processing system and the data transmitted to the ground are also described.
  • The in-orbit performance and calibration of the Hard X-ray Detector (HXD) on board the X-ray astronomy satellite Suzaku are described. Its basic performances, including a wide energy bandpass of 10-600 keV, energy resolutions of ~4 keV (FWHM) at 40 keV and ~11% at 511 keV, and a high background rejection efficiency, have been confirmed by extensive in-orbit calibrations. The long-term gains of PIN-Si diodes have been stable within 1% for half a year, and those of scintillators have decreased by 5-20%. The residual non-X-ray background of the HXD is the lowest among past non-imaging hard X-ray instruments in energy ranges of 15-70 and 150-500 keV. We provide accurate calibrations of energy responses, angular responses, timing accuracy of the HXD, and relative normalizations to the X-ray CCD cameras using multiple observations of the Crab Nebula.
  • Two ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs) in the nearby Sb galaxy NGC 1313, named X-1 and X-2, were observed with Suzaku on 2005 September 15. During the observation for a net exposure of 28~ks (but over a gross time span of 90~ks), both objects varied in intensity by about 50~%. The 0.4--10 keV X-ray luminosity of X-1 and X-2 was measured as $2.5 \times 10^{40}~{\rm erg~s^{-1}}$ and $5.8 \times 10^{39}~{\rm erg~s^{-1}}$, respectively, with the former the highest ever reported for this ULX. The spectrum of X-1 can be explained by a sum of a strong and variable power-law component with a high energy cutoff, and a stable multicolor blackbody with an innermost disk temperature of $\sim 0.2$ keV. These results suggest that X-1 was in a ``very high'' state, where the disk emission is strongly Comptonized. The absorber within NGC 1313 toward X-1 is suggested to have a subsolar oxygen abundance. The spectrum of X-2 is best represented, in its fainter phase, by a multicolor blackbody model with the innermost disk temperature of 1.2--1.3 keV, and becomes flatter as the source becomes brighter. Hence X-2 is interpreted to be in a slim-disk state. These results suggest that the two ULXs have black hole masses of a few tens to a few hundreds solar masses.
  • Using the X-ray data taken with ASCA, a detailed analysis was made of intensity and spectral variations of three ultra-luminous extra-galactic compact X-ray sources (ULXs); IC 342 source 1, M81 X-6, and NGC 1313 source B, all exhibiting X-ray luminosity in the range 10^{39}-1.5x10^{40} erg s^{-1}. As already reported, IC 342 source 1 showed short-term X-ray intensity variability by a factor of 2.0 on a typical time scale of 10 ks. M81 X-6 varied by a factor of 1.6 across seven observations spanning 3 years, while NGC 1313 source B varied by a factor of 2.5 between two observations conducted in 1993 July and 1995 November. The ASCA spectra of these sources, acquired on these occasions, were all described successfully as optically-thick emission from standard accretion disks around black holes. This confirms previous ASCA works which explained ULXs as mass-accreting massive black-hole binaries. In all three sources, the disk color temperature was uncomfortably high at T_{in}=1.0-2.0 keV, and was found to vary in proportion to the square-root of the source flux. The apparent accretion-disk radius is hence inferred to change as inversely proportional to T_{in}. This suggests a significant effect of advection in the accretion disk. However, even taking this effect fully into account, the too high values of T_{in} of ULXs cannot be explained. Further invoking the rapid black-hole rotation may give a solution to this issue.
  • We report results from simultaneous ASCA and RXTE observations of Cyg X-1 when the source made a rare transition from the hard (= low) state to the soft (= high) state in 1996. These observations together cover a broad energy range ~0.7--50 keV with a moderate energy resolution at the iron K-band, thus make it possible to disentangle various spectral components. The low-energy spectrum is dominated by an ultra-soft component, which is likely to be the emission from the hottest inner portion of the accretion disk around the black hole. At high energies, the X-ray spectrum can be described by a Comptonized spectrum with a reflection component. The Compton corona, which upscatters soft ``seed photons'' to produce the hard X-ray emission, is found to have a y-parameter ~0.28. The hard X-ray emission illuminates the accretion disk and the re-emitted photons produce the observed ``reflection bump''. We show that the reflecting medium subtends only a small solid angle ($\sim 0.15\times 2\pi$), but has a large ionization parameter such that iron is ionized up to \ion{Fe}{24}-\ion{Fe}{26}. The presence of a broad iron line at $6.58\pm0.04$ keV is also consistent with a highly ionized disk, if we take into account the gravitational and Doppler shift of the line energy. These results imply a geometry with a central corona surrounding the black hole and the reflection occurring in the innermost region of the disk where matter is highly ionized.