• Autoionization, which results from the interference between direct photoionization and photoexcitation to a discrete state decaying to the continuum by configuration interaction, is a well known example of the important role of electron correlation in light-matter interaction. Information on this process can be obtained by studying the spectral, or equivalently, temporal complex amplitude of the ionized electron wavepacket. Using an energy-resolved interferometric technique, we measure the spectral amplitude and phase of autoionized wavepackets emitted via the sp2+ and sp3+ resonances in helium. These measurements allow us to reconstruct the corresponding temporal profiles by Fourier transform. In addition, applying various time-frequency representations, we observe the build up of the wavepackets in the continuum, monitor the instantaneous frequencies emitted at any time and disentangle the dynamics of the direct and resonant ionization channels.
  • Ultrafast processes in matter, such as the electron emission following light absorption, can now be studied using ultrashort light pulses of attosecond duration ($10^{-18}$s) in the extreme ultraviolet spectral range. The lack of spectral resolution due to the use of short light pulses may raise serious issues in the interpretation of the experimental results and the comparison with detailed theoretical calculations. Here, we determine photoionization time delays in neon atoms over a 40 eV energy range with an interferometric technique combining high temporal and spectral resolution. We spectrally disentangle direct ionization from ionization with shake up, where a second electron is left in an excited state, thus obtaining excellent agreement with theoretical calculations and thereby solving a puzzle raised by seven-year-old measurements. Our experimental approach does not have conceptual limits, allowing us to foresee, with the help of upcoming laser technology, ultra-high resolution time-frequency studies from the visible to the x-ray range.
  • The sub-cycle dynamics of electrons driven by strong laser fields is central to the emerging field of attosecond science. We demonstrate how the dynamics can be probed through high-order harmonic generation, where different trajectories leading to the same harmonic order are initiated at different times, thereby probing different field strengths. We find large differences between the trajectories with respect to both their sensitivity to driving field ellipticity and resonant enhancement. To accurately describe the ellipticity dependence of the long trajectory harmonics we must include a sub-cycle change of the initial velocity distribution of the electron and its excursion time. The resonant enhancement is observed only for the long trajectory contribution of a particular harmonic when a window resonance in argon, which is off-resonant in the field-free case, is shifted into resonance due to a large dynamic Stark shift.
  • We present the first demonstration of two-photon double ionization of neon using an intense extreme ultraviolet (XUV) attosecond pulse train (APT) in a photon energy regime where both direct and sequential mechanisms are allowed. For an APT generated through high-order harmonic generation (HHG) in argon we achieve a total pulse energy close to 1 $\mu$J, a central energy of 35 eV and a total bandwidth of $\sim30$ eV. The APT is focused by broadband optics in a neon gas target to an intensity of $3\cdot10^{12} $W$\cdot$cm$^{-2}$. By tuning the photon energy across the threshold for the sequential process the double ionization signal can be turned on and off, indicating that the two-photon double ionization predominantly occurs through a sequential process. The demonstrated performance opens up possibilities for future XUV-XUV pump-probe experiments with attosecond temporal resolution in a photon energy range where it is possible to unravel the dynamics behind direct vs. sequential double ionization and the associated electron correlation effects.
  • Nonlinear optical methods are becoming ubiquitous in many areas of modern photonics. They are, however, often limited to a certain range of input parameters, such as pulse energy and average power, since restrictions arise from, for example, parasitic nonlinear effects, damage problems and geometrical considerations. Here, we show that many nonlinear optics phenomena in gaseous media are scale-invariant if spatial coordinates, gas density and laser pulse energy are scaled appropriately. We develop a general scaling model for (3+1)-dimensional wave equations, demonstrating the invariant scaling of nonlinear pulse propagation in gases. Our model is numerically applied to high-order harmonic generation and filamentation as well as experimentally verified using the example of pulse post-compression via filamentation. Our results provide a simple recipe for up-or downscaling of nonlinear processes in gases with numerous applications in many areas of science.
  • We study the photoionization of argon atoms close to the 3s$^2$3p$^6$ $\rightarrow$ 3s$^1$3p$^6$4p $\leftrightarrow$ 3s$^2$3p$^5$ $\varepsilon \ell$, $\ell$=s,d Fano window resonance. An interferometric technique using an attosecond pulse train, i.e. a frequency comb in the extreme ultraviolet range, and a weak infrared probe field allows us to study both amplitude and phase of the photoionization probability amplitude as a function of photon energy. A theoretical calculation of the ionization process accounting for several continuum channels and bandwidth effects reproduces well the experimental observations and shows that the phase variation of the resonant two-photon amplitude depends on the interaction between the channels involved in the autoionization process.
  • This tutorial presents an introduction to the interaction of light and matter on the attosecond timescale. Our aim is to detail the theoretical description of ultra-short time-delays, and to relate these to the phase of extreme ultraviolet (XUV) light pulses and to the asymptotic phase-shifts of photoelectron wave packets. Special emphasis is laid on time-delay experiments, where attosecond XUV pulses are used to photoionize target atoms at well-defined times, followed by a probing process in real time by a phase-locked, infrared laser field. In this way, the laser field serves as a "clock" to monitor the ionization event, but the observable delays do not correspond directly to the delay associated with single-photon ionization. Instead, a significant part of the observed delay originates from a measurement induced process, which obscures the single-photon ionization dynamics. This artifact is traced back to a phase-shift of the above-threshold ionization transition matrix element, which we call the continuum-continuum phase. It arises due to the laser-stimulated transitions between Coulomb continuum states. As we shall show here, these measurement-induced effects can be separated from the single-photon ionization process, using analytical expressions of universal character, so that eventually the attosecond time-delays in photoionization can be accessed.
  • We present experimental measurements and theoretical calculations of photoionization time delays from the $3s$ and $3p$ shells in Ar in the photon energy range of 32-42 eV. The experimental measurements are performed by interferometry using attosecond pulse trains and the infrared laser used for their generation. The theoretical approach includes intershell correlation effects between the 3s and 3p shells within the framework of the random phase approximation with exchange (RPAE). The connection between single-photon ionization and the two-color two-photon ionization process used in the measurement is established using the recently developed asymptotic approximation for the complex transition amplitudes of laser-assisted photoionization. We compare and discuss the theoretical and experimental results especially in the region where strong intershell correlations in the 3s to kp channel lead to an induced "Cooper" minimum in the 3s ionization cross-section.
  • We study the temporal aspects of laser-assisted extreme ultraviolet (XUV) photoionization using attosecond pulses of harmonic radiation. The aim of this paper is to establish the general form of the phase of the relevant transition amplitudes and to make the connection with the time-delays that have been recently measured in experiments. We find that the overall phase contains two distinct types of contributions: one is expressed in terms of the phase-shifts of the photoelectron continuum wavefunction while the other is linked to continuum--continuum transitions induced by the infrared (IR) laser probe. Our formalism applies to both kinds of measurements reported so far, namely the ones using attosecond pulse trains of XUV harmonics and the others based on the use of isolated attosecond pulses (streaking). The connection between the phases and the time-delays is established with the help of finite difference approximations to the energy derivatives of the phases. This makes clear that the observed time-delays is a sum of two components: a one-photon Wigner-like delay and an universal delay that originates from the probing process itself.
  • We investigate the generation of even and odd harmonics using an intense laser and a weak second harmonic field. Our theoretical approach is based on solving the saddle-point equations within the Strong Field Approximation. The phase of the even harmonic oscillation as a function of the delay between fundamental and second harmonic field is calculated and its variation with energy is found to be in good agreement with recent experimental results. We also find that the relationship between this phase variation and the group delay of the attosecond pulses, depends on the intensity and wavelength of the fundamental field as well as the ionization potential of the atom.
  • We study photoionization of argon atoms excited by attosecond pulses using an interferometric measurement technique. We measure the difference in time delays between electrons emitted from the $3s^2$ and from the $3p^6$ shell, at different excitation energies ranging from 32 to 42 eV. The determination of single photoemission time delays requires to take into account the measurement process, involving the interaction with a probing infrared field. This contribution can be estimated using an universal formula and is found to account for a substantial fraction of the measured delay.
  • We present an interferometric pump-probe technique for the characterization of attosecond electron wave packets (WPs) that uses a free WP as a reference to measure a bound WP. We demonstrate our method by exciting helium atoms using an attosecond pulse with a bandwidth centered near the ionization threshold, thus creating both a bound and a free WP simultaneously. After a variable delay, the bound WP is ionized by a few-cycle infrared laser precisely synchronized to the original attosecond pulse. By measuring the delay-dependent photoelectron spectrum we obtain an interferogram that contains both quantum beats as well as multi-path interference. Analysis of the interferogram allows us to determine the bound WP components with a spectral resolution much better than the inverse of the attosecond pulse duration.
  • We study resonant two-color two-photon ionization of Helium via the 1s3p 1P1 state. The first color is the 15th harmonic of a tunable titanium sapphire laser, while the second color is the fundamental laser radiation. Our method uses phase-locked high-order harmonics to determine the {\it phase} of the two-photon process by interferometry. The measurement of the two-photon ionization phase variation as a function of detuning from the resonance and intensity of the dressing field allows us to determine the intensity dependence of the transition energy.
  • We study experimentally the influence of the intensity of the infrared (IR) probe field on attosecond pulse train (APT) phase measurements performed with the RABITT method (Reconstruction of Attosecond Beating by Interference in Two-Photon Transitions). We find that if a strong IR field is applied, the attosecond pulses will appear to have lower-than-actual chirp rates. We also observe the onset of the streaking regime in the breakdown of the weak-field RABITT conditions. We perform a Fourier-analysis of harmonic and sideband continuum states and show that the mutual phase relation of the harmonics can be extracted from higher Fourier components.
  • We examine how the generation and propagation of high-order harmonics in a partly ionized gas medium affect their strength and synchronization. The temporal properties of the resulting attosecond pulses generated in long gas targets can be significantly influenced by macroscopic effects, in particular by the intensity in the medium and the degree of ionization. Under some conditions, the use of gas targets longer than the absorption length can lead to the generation of self-compressed attosecond pulses. We show this effect experimentally, using long argon-filled gas cells as generating medium.