• We theoretically study the impact of impurities on the photogalvanic effect (PGE) in Weyl semimetals with weakly tilted Weyl cones. Our calculations are based on a two-nodes model with an inversion symmetry breaking offset and we employ a kinetic equation approach in which both optical transitions as well as particle-hole excitations near the Fermi energy can be taken into account. We focus on the parameter regime with a single photoactive node and control the calculation in small impurity concentration. Internode scattering is treated generically and therefore our results allow to continuously interpolate between the cases of short range and long range impurities. We find that the time evolution of the circular PGE may be nonmonotonic for intermediate internode scattering. Furthermore, we show that the tilt vector introduces three additional linearly independent components to the steady state photocurrent. Amongst them, the photocurrent in direction of the tilt takes a particular role inasmuch it requires elastic internode scattering or inelastic intranode scattering to be relaxed. It may therefore be dominant. The tilt also generates skew scattering which leads to a current component perpendicular to both the incident light and the tilt. We extensively discuss our findings and comment on the possible experimental implications.
  • We theoretically study Coulomb drag between two helical edges with broken spin-rotational symmetry, such as would occur in two capacitively coupled quantum spin Hall insulators. For the helical edges, Coulomb drag is particularly interesting because it specifically probes the inelastic interactions that break the conductance quantization for a single edge. Using the kinetic equation formalism, supplemented by bosonization, we find that the drag resistivity $\rho_D$ exhibits a nonmonotonic dependence on the temperature $T$. In the limit of low $T$, $\rho_D$ vanishes with decreasing $T$ as a power law if intraedge interactions are not too strong. This is in stark contrast to Coulomb drag in conventional quantum wires, where $\rho_D$ diverges at $T\to 0$ irrespective of the strength of repulsive interactions. Another unusual property of Coulomb drag between the helical edges concerns higher $T$ for which, unlike in the Luttinger liquid model, drag is mediated by plasmons. The special type of plasmon-mediated drag can be viewed as a distinguishing feature of the helical liquid---because it requires peculiar Umklapp scattering only available in the presence of a Dirac point in the electron spectrum.
  • The physics of the crossover between weak-coupling Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS) and strong-coupling Bose-Einstein-condensate (BEC) limits gives a unified framework of quantum bound (superfluid) states of interacting fermions. This crossover has been studied in the ultracold atomic systems, but is extremely difficult to be realized for electrons in solids. Recently, the superconducting semimetal FeSe with a transition temperature $T_{\rm c}=8.5$ K has been found to be deep inside the BCS-BEC crossover regime. Here we report experimental signatures of preformed Cooper pairing in FeSe below $T^*\sim20$ K, whose energy scale is comparable to the Fermi energies. In stark contrast to usual superconductors, large nonlinear diamagnetism by far exceeding the standard Gaussian superconducting fluctuations is observed below $T^*\sim20$ K, providing thermodynamic evidence for prevailing phase fluctuations of superconductivity. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and transport data give evidence of pseudogap formation at $\sim T^*$. The multiband superconductivity along with electron-hole compensation in FeSe may highlight a novel aspect of the BCS-BEC crossover physics.
  • We study the density of states and magnetotransport properties of disordered Weyl semimetals, focusing on the case of a strong long-range disorder. To calculate the disorder-averaged density of states close to nodal points, we treat exactly the long-range random potential fluctuations produced by charged impurities, while the short-range component of disorder potential is included systematically and controllably with the help of a diagram technique. We find that for energies close to the degeneracy point, long-range potential fluctuations lead to a finite density of states. In the context of transport, we discuss that a self-consistent theory of screening in magnetic field may conceivably lead to non-monotonic low-field magnetoresistance.
  • We study the quantum fidelity (groundstate overlap) near quantum phase transitions of the Ising universality class in one dimensional (1D) systems of finite size L. Prominent examples occur in magnetic systems (e.g. spin-Peierls, the anisotropic XY model), and in 1D topological insulators of any topologically nontrivial Altland-Zirnbauer-Kitaev universality class. The rescaled fidelity susceptibility is a function of the only dimensionless parameter LM, where 2M is the gap in the fermionic spectrum. We present analytic expressions for the fidelity susceptibility for periodic and open boundaries conditions with zero, one or two edgestates. The latter are shown to have a crucial impact and alter the susceptibility both quantitatively and qualitatively. We support our analytical solutions with numerical data.
  • Coulomb drag between parallel quantum wells provides a uniquely sensitive measurement of electron correlations since the drag response depends on interactions only. Recently it has been demonstrated that a new regime of strong interactions can be accessed for devices consisting of two monlolayer graphene (MLG) crystals, separated by few layer hexagonal boron-nitride. Here we report measurement of Coulomb drag in a double bilayer graphene (BLG) stucture, where the interaction potential is anticipated to be yet further enhanced compared to MLG. At low temperatures and intermediate densities a new drag response with inverse sign is observed, distinct from the momentum and energy drag mechanisms previously reported in double MLG. We demonstrate that by varying the device aspect ratio the negative drag component can be suppressed and a response showing excellent agreement with the density and temperature dependance predicted for momentum drag in double BLG is found. Our results pave the way for pursuit of emergent phases in strongly interacting bilayers, such as the exciton condensate.
  • We calculate the anomalous Hall conductivity $\sigma_{xy}$ of the surface states {in cubic topological Kondo insulators}. We consider a generic model for the surface states with three Dirac cones on the (001) surface. The Fermi velocity, the Fermi momentum and the Zeeman energy in different Dirac pockets may be unequal. The microscopic impurity potential mediates mixed intra and interband extrinsic scattering processes. Our calculation of $\sigma_{xy}$ is based on the Kubo-Streda diagrammatic approach. It includes diffractive skew scattering contributions originating from the rare two-impurity complexes. Remarkably, these contributions yield anomalous Hall conductivity that is independent of impurity concentration, and thus is of the same order as other known extrinsic side jump and skew scattering terms. We discuss various special cases of our results and the experimental relevance of our study in the context of the recent hysteretic magnetotransport data in SmB$_6$ samples.
  • We develop a theory for the vortex unbinding transition in homogeneously disordered superconducting films. This theory incorporates the effects of quantum, mesoscopic and thermal fluctuations stemming from length scales ranging from the superconducting coherence length down to the Fermi wavelength. In particular, we extend the renormalization group treatment of the diffusive nonlinear sigma model to the superconducting side of the transition. Furthermore, we explore the mesoscopic fluctuations of parameters in the Ginzburg-Landau functional. Using the developed theory, we determine the dependence of essential observables (including the vortex unbinding temperature, the superconducting density, as well as the temperature-dependent resistivity and thermal conductivity) on microscopic characteristics such as the disorder-induced scattering rate and bare interaction couplings.
  • We study the effect of disorder on the London penetration depth in iron-based superconductors. The theory is based on a two-band model with quasi-two-dimensional Fermi surfaces, which allows for the coexistence region in the phase diagram between magnetic and superconducting states in the presence of intraband and interband scattering. Within the quasiclassical approximation we derive and solve Eilenberger's equations, which include a weak external magnetic field, and provide analytical expressions for the penetration depth in the various limiting cases. A complete numerical analysis of the doping and temperature dependence of the London penetration depth reveals the crucial effect of disorder scattering, which is especially pronounced in the coexistence phase. The experimental implications of our results are discussed.
  • We use the symmetry constrained low energy effective Hamiltonian of iron based superconductors to study the Raman scattering in the normal state of underdoped iron-based superconductors. The incoming and scattered Raman photons couple directly to orbital fluctuations and indirectly to the spin fluctuations. We computed both couplings within the same low energy model. The symmetry constrained Hamiltonian yields the coupling between the orbital and spin fluctuations of only the same symmetry type. Attraction in B2g symmetry channel was assumed for the system to develop the subleading instability towards the discrete in-plane rotational symmetry breaking, referred to as Ising nematic transition. We find that upon approaching this instability, the Raman spectral function develops a quasi-elastic peak as a function of energy transferred by photons to the crystal. We attribute this low-energy B2g scattering to the critical slow-down associated with the build up of nematic correlations.
  • We develop a Boltzmann-Langevin description of Coulomb drag effect in clean double-layer systems with large interlayer separation $d$ as compared to the average interelectron distance $\lambda_F$. Coulomb drag arises from density fluctuations with spatial scales of order $d$. At low temperatures, their characteristic frequencies exceed the intralayer equilibration rate of the electron liquid, and Coulomb drag may be treated in the collisionless approximation. As temperature is raised, the electron mean free path becomes short due to electron-electron scattering. This leads to local equilibration of electron liquid, and consequently drag is determined by hydrodynamic density modes. Our theory applies to both the collisionless and the hydrodynamic regimes, and it enables us to describe the crossover between them. We find that drag resistivity exhibits a nonmonotonic temperature dependence with multiple crossovers at distinct energy scales. At the lowest temperatures, Coulomb drag is dominated by the particle-hole continuum, whereas at higher temperatures of the collision-dominated regime it is governed by the plasmon modes. We observe that fast intralayer equilibration mediated by electron-electron collisions ultimately renders a stronger drag effect.
  • Coulomb drag is a transport phenomenon whereby long-range Coulomb interaction between charge carriers in two closely spaced but electrically isolated conductors induces a voltage (or, in a closed circuit, a current) in one of the conductors when an electrical current is passed through the other. The magnitude of the effect depends on the exact nature of the charge carriers and microscopic, many-body structure of the electronic systems in the two conductors. Drag measurements have become part of the standard toolbox in condensed matter physics that can be used to study fundamental properties of diverse physical systems including semiconductor heterostructures, graphene, quantum wires, quantum dots, and optical cavities.
  • We develop a hydrodynamic description of the collective modes of interacting liquids in a quasi-one-dimensional confining potential. By solving Navier-Stokes equations we determine analytically excitation spectrum of sloshing oscillations. For parabolic confinement, the lowest frequency eigenmode is not renormalized by interactions and is protected from decay by the Kohn theorem, which states that center of mass motion decouples from internal dynamics. We find that the combined effect of potential anharmonicity and interactions results in the depolarization shift and final lifetime of the Kohn mode. All other excited modes of sloshing oscillations thermalize with the parametrically faster rates. Our results are significant for the interpretation of recent experiments with trapped Fermi gases that observed weak violation of the Kohn theorem.
  • We consider strongly interacting one-dimensional electron liquids where elementary excitations carry either spin or charge. At small temperatures a spinon created at the bottom of its band scatters off low-energy spin- and charge-excitations and follows the diffusive motion of a Brownian particle in momentum space. We calculate the mobility characterizing these processes, and show that the resulting diffusion coefficient of the spinon is parametrically enhanced at low temperatures compared to that of a mobile impurity in a spinless Luttinger liquid. We briefly discuss that this hints at the relevance of spin in the process of equilibration of strongly interacting one-dimensional electrons, and comment on implications for transport in clean single channel quantum wires.
  • When a superconductor is heated above its critical temperature $T_c$, macroscopic coherence vanishes, leaving behind droplets of thermally fluctuating Cooper pair. This superconducting fluctuation effect above $T_c$ has been investigated for many decades and its influence on the transport, thermoelectric and thermodynamic quantities in most superconductors is well understood by the standard Gaussian fluctuation theories. The transverse thermoelectric (Nernst) effect is particularly sensitive to the fluctuations, and the large Nernst signal found in the pseudogap regime of the underdoped high-$T_c$ cuprates has raised much debate on its connection to the origin of superconductivity. Here we report on the observation of a colossal Nernst signal due to the superconducting fluctuations in the heavy-fermion superconductor URu$_2$Si$_2$. The Nernst coefficient is enhanced by as large as one million times over the theoretically expected value within the standard framework of superconducting fluctuations. This, for the first time in any known material, results in a sizeable thermomagnetic figure of merit approaching unity. Moreover, contrary to the conventional wisdom, the enhancement in the Nernst signal is more significant with the reduction of the impurity scattering rate. This anomalous Nernst effect intimately reflects the highly unusual superconducting state embedded in the so-called hidden-order phase of URu$_2$Si$_2$. The results invoke possible chiral or Berry-phase fluctuations originated from the topological aspect of this superconductor, which are associated with the effective magnetic field intrinsically induced by broken time-reversal symmetry of the superconducting order parameter.
  • We study interaction-induced backscattering in clean quantum wires with adiabatic contacts exposed to a voltage bias. Particle backscattering relaxes such systems to a fully equilibrated steady state only on length scales exponentially large in the ratio of bandwidth of excitations and temperature. Here we focus on shorter wires in which full equilibration is not accomplished. Signatures of relaxation then are due to backscattering of hole excitations close to the band bottom which perform a diffusive motion in momentum space while scattering from excitations at the Fermi level. This is reminiscent to the first passage problem of a Brownian particle and, regardless of the interaction strength, can be described by an inhomogeneous Fokker-Planck equation. From general solutions of the latter we calculate the hole backscattering rate for different wire lengths and discuss the resulting length dependence of interaction-induced correction to the conductance of a clean single channel quantum wire.
  • We develop a theory of Coulomb drag in ultraclean double layers with strongly correlated carriers. In the regime where the equilibration length of the electron liquid is shorter than the interlayer spacing the main contribution to the Coulomb drag arises from hydrodynamic density fluctuations. The latter consist of plasmons driven by fluctuating longitudinal stresses, and diffusive modes caused by temperature fluctuations and thermal expansion of the electron liquid. We express the drag resistivity in terms of the kinetic coefficients of the electron fluid. Our results are nonperturbative in interaction strength and do not assume Fermi-liquid behavior of the electron liquid.
  • Measurements of the specific heat jump at the onset of superconducting transition in the iron-pnictide compounds revealed strong variation of its magnitude as a function of doping that is peaked near the optimal doping. We show that this behavior is direct manifestation of the coexistence between spin-density-wave and superconducting orders and the peak originates from thermal fluctuations of the spin-density-waves near the end point of the coexistence phase -- a tetracritical point. Thermal fluctuations result in a power-law dependence of the specific heat jump that is stronger than the contribution of mass renormalization due to quantum fluctuations of spin-density-waves in the vicinity of the putative critical point beneath the superconducting dome.
  • We have studied microwave photoresistance in a two-dimensional electron system subject to two radiation fields (frequencies $\omega_1$ and $\omega_2$) using quantum kinetic equation. We have found that when $\omega_2/\omega_1= 1 + 2/N$, where $N$ is an integer, and both waves have the same polarization, the displacement mechanism gives rise to a new, phase-sensitive photoresistance. This photoresistance oscillates with the magnetic field and can be a good fraction of the total photoresistance under typical experimental conditions. The inelastic mechanism, on the other hand, gives zero phase-sensitive photoresistance if the radiation fields are circularly polarized.
  • We perform measurements of phase-slip-induced switching current events on different types of superconducting weak links and systematically study statistical properties of the switching current distributions. We employ two types of devices in which a weak link is formed either by a superconducting nanowire or by a graphene flake subject to proximity effect. We demonstrate that, independently on the nature of the weak link, higher moments of the distribution take universal values. In particular, the third moment (skewness) of the distribution is close to -1 both in thermal and quantum regimes. The fourth moment (kurtosis) also takes a universal value close to 5. The discovered universality of skewness and kurtosis is confirmed by an analytical model. Our numerical analysis shows that introduction of extraneous noise into the system leads to significant deviations from the universal values. We suggest to use the discovered universality of higher moments as a robust tool for checking against undesirable effects on noise in various types of measurements.
  • Recent measurements of the doping dependence of the London penetration depth \lambda(x) at low temperatures in clean samples of isovalent BaFe_2[As_(1-x)P_x]_2 at T<<Tc [Hashimoto et al., Science 336, 1554 (2012)] revealed a peak in \lambda(x) near optimal doping x=0.3. The observation of the peak at T<<Tc, points to the existence of the quantum critical point (QCP) beneath the superconducting dome. We associate such a QCP with the onset of a spin- density-wave order and show that the renormalization of \lambda(x) by critical magnetic fluctuations, gives rise to the observed feature. We argue that the case of pnictides is conceptually different from a one-component Galilean invariant Fermi liquid, for which correlation effects do not cause the renormalization of the London penetration depth at T=0.
  • Motivated by a recent experiment by Bergeal et al., we reconsider incoherent pair tunneling in a cuprate junction formed from an optimally doped superconducting lead and an underdoped normal metallic lead. We study the impact of the pseudogap on the pair tunneling by describing fermions in the underdoped lead with a model self-energy that has been developed to reproduce photoemission data. We find that the pseudogap causes an additional temperature dependent suppression of the pair contribution to the tunneling current. We discuss consistency with available experimental data and propose future experimental directions.
  • We calculate the linear and nonlinear conductance of spinless fermions in clean, long quantum wires where short-ranged interactions lead locally to equilibration. Close to the quantum phase transition where the conductance jumps from zero to one conductance quantum, the conductance obtains an universal form governed by the ratios of temperature, bias voltage and gate voltage. Asymptotic analytic results are compared to solutions of a Boltzmann equation which includes the effects of three-particle scattering. Surprisingly, we find that for long wires the voltage predominantly drops close to one end of the quantum wire due to a thermoelectric effect.
  • We measure quantum and thermal phase-slip rates using the standard deviation of the switching current in superconducting nanowires at high bias current. Our rigorous quantitative analysis provides firm evidence for the presence of quantum phase slips (QPS) in homogeneous nanowires. We observe that as temperature is lowered, thermal fluctuations freeze at a characteristic crossover temperature Tq, below which the dispersion of the switching current saturates to a constant value, indicating the presence of QPS. The scaling of the crossover temperature Tq with the critical temperature Tc is linear, which is consistent with the theory of macroscopic quantum tunneling. We can convert the wires from the initial amorphous phase to a single crystal phase, in situ, by applying calibrated voltage pulses. This technique allows us to probe directly the effects of the wire resistance, critical temperature and morphology on thermal and quantum phase slips.
  • We study the transport in ultrathin disordered film near the quantum critical point induced by the Zeeman field. We calculate corrections to the normal state conductivity due to quantum pairing fluctuations. The fluctuation-induced transport is mediated by virtual rather than real quasi-particles. We find that at zero temperature, where the corrections come from purely quantum fluctuations, the Aslamazov-Larkin paraconductivity term, the Maki-Thompson interference contribution and the density of states effects are all of the same order. The total correction leads to the negative magnetoresistance. This result is in qualitative agreement with the recent transport observations in the parallel magnetic field of the homogeneously disordered amorphous films and superconducting two-dimensional electron gas realized at the oxide interfaces.