• We investigated the growth of titanium oxide two-dimensional (2D) nanostructures on Au(111), produced by Ti evaporation and post-deposition oxidation. Scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy (STM and STS) and low-energy electron diffraction (LEED) measurements characterized the morphological, structural and electronic properties of the observed structures. Five distinct TiO\sub{x} phases were identified: the \emph{honeycomb} and \emph{pinwheel} phases appear as monolayer films wetting the gold surface, while nanocrystallites of the \emph{triangular}, \emph{row} and \emph{needle} phases grow mainly over the honeycomb or pinwheel layers. Density Functional Theory (DFT) investigation of the honeycomb structure supports a $(2\times 2)$ structural model based on a Ti-O bilayer having $\text{Ti}_2\text{O}_3$ stoichiometry. The pinwheel phase was observed to evolve, for increasing coverage, from single triangular crystallites to a well-ordered film forming a $(4\sqrt{7}\times 4\sqrt{7})R19.1^\circ$ superstructure, which can be interpreted within a moir\~A\c{opyright}-like model. Structural characteristics of the other three phases were disclosed from the analysis of high-resolution STM measurements. STS measurements revealed a partial metallization of honeycomb and pinwheel and a semiconducting character of row and triangular phases.
  • Graded Al-doped ZnO layers, constituted by a mesoporous forest like system evolving into a compact transparent conductor, were synthesized by Pulsed Laser Deposition with different morphology to study the correlation with functional properties. Morphology was monitored by measuring the resulting surface roughness and its effects on electrical conductivity (especially carrier mobility, which significantly decreases with increasing roughness) allow to discuss the limitations in conduction mechanisms. Significant changes in light scattering capability due to variations in morphology are also investigated and discussed to study the correlation between morphology and functional properties.
  • In this work we present a detailed Raman scattering investigation of zinc oxide and aluminum-doped zinc oxide (AZO) films characterized by a variety of nanoscale structure and morphology and synthesized by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) under different oxygen pressure conditions. The comparison of Raman data for pure ZnO and AZO films with similar morphology at the nano/mesoscale allows to investigate the relation between Raman features (peak or band positions, width, relative intensity) and material properties such as local structural order, stoichiometry and doping. Moreover Raman measurements with three different excitation lines (532, 457 and 325 nm) point out a strong correlation between vibrational and electronic properties. This observation confirms the relevance of a multi-wavelength Raman investigation to obtain a complete structural characterization of advanced doped oxide materials.
  • The structure-property relation of nanostructured Al-doped ZnO thin films has been investigated in detail through a systematic variation of structure and morphology, with particular emphasis on how they affect optical and electrical properties. A variety of structures, ranging from compact polycristalline films to mesoporous, hierarchically organized cluster assemblies, are grown by Pulsed Laser Deposition at room temperature at different oxygen pressures. We investigate the dependence of functional properties on structure and morphology and show how the correlation between electrical and optical properties can be studied to evaluate energy gap, conduction band effective mass and transport mechanisms. Understanding these properties opens the way for specific applications in photovoltaic devices, where optimized combinations of conductivity, transparency and light scattering are required.
  • The formation mechanisms of evaporated Pd islands on the reconstructed Au(111) $22 /times /sqrt{3}$ herringbone surface have been here studied by Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM) at room temperature. Atomically resolved STM images at the very early stages of growth provide a direct observation of the mechanisms involved in preferential Pd islands nucleation at the elbows of the herringbone structure. At low Pd coverage the Au(111) herringbone structure remains substantially unperturbed and isolated Pd atoms settled in hollow sites between Au atoms are found nearby the elbows and the distortions of the reconstructed surface. In the same regions, at extremely low coverage (0.003 ML), substituted Pd atoms in lattice sites of the Au(111) surface are also observed, revealing the occurrence of a place exchange mechanism. Substitution seems to play a fundamental role in the nucleation process, forming aggregation centers for incoming atoms and thus leading to the ordered growth of Pd islands on Au(111). Atomically resolved STM images of Pd islands reveal a close-packed arrangement with lattice parameter close to the interatomic distance between gold atoms in the fcc regions of the Au(111) surface. Distortion of the herringbone structure for Pd coverages higher than 0.25 ML indicates strong interaction between the growing islands and the topmost Au(111) layer.
  • Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS) is exploited here to investigate the interaction of isolated sp carbon chains (polyynes) in a methanol solution with silver nanoparticles. Hydrogen-terminated polyynes show a strong interaction with silver colloids used as the SERS active medium revealing a chemical SERS effect. SERS spectra after mixing polyynes with silver colloids show a noticeable time evolution. Experimental results, supported by density functional theory (DFT) calculations of the Raman modes, allow us to investigate the behavior and stability of polyynes of different lengths and the overall sp conversion towards sp2 phase.
  • A template-free process for the synthesis of nanocrystalline TiO2 hierarchical microstructures by reactive Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD) is here presented. By a proper choice of deposition parameters a fine control over the morphology of TiO2 microstructures is demonstrated, going from classical compact/columnar films to a dense forest of distinct hierarchical assemblies of ultrafine nanoparticles (<10 nm), up to a more disordered, aerogel-type structure. Correspondingly, film density varies with respect to bulk TiO2 anatase, with a degree of porosity going from 48% to over 90%. These structures are stable with respect to heat treatment at 400 centigrade degrees, which results in crystalline ordering but not in morphological changes down to the nanoscale. Both as deposited and annealed films exhibit very promising photocatalytic properties, even superior to standard Degussa P25 powder, as demonstrated by the degradation of stearic acid as a model molecule. The observed kinetics are correlated to the peculiar morphology of the PLD grown material. We show that the 3D multi-scale hierarchical morphology enhances reaction kinetics and creates an ideal environment for mass transport and photon absorption, maximizing the surface area-to-volume ratio while at the same time providing readily accessible porosity through the large inter-tree spaces that act as distributing channels. The reported strategy provides a versatile technique to fabricate high aspect ratio 3D titania microstuctures through a hierarchical assembly of ultrafine nanoparticles. Beyond photocatalytic and catalytic applications, this kind of material could be of interest for those applications where high surface-to-volume and efficient mass transport are required at the same time.
  • A novel form of amorphous carbon with sp-sp2 hybridization has been recently produced by supersonic cluster beam deposition showing the presence in the film of both polyynic and cumulenic species [L. Ravagnan et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 216103 (2007)]. Here we present a in situ Raman characterization of the low frequency vibrational region (400-800 cm-1) of sp-sp2 films at different temperatures. We report the presence of two peaks at 450 cm-1 and 720 cm-1. The lower frequency peak shows an evolution with the variation of the sp content and it can be attributed, with the support of density functional theory (DFT) simulations, to bending modes of sp linear structures. The peak at 720 cm-1 does not vary with the sp content and it can be attributed to a feature in the vibrational density of states activated by the disorder of the sp2 phase.
  • A simple, reliable method for preparation of bulk Cr tips for Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM) is proposed and its potentialities in performing high-quality and high-resolution STM and Spin Polarized-STM (SP-STM) are investigated. Cr tips show atomic resolution on ordered surfaces. Contrary to what happens with conventional W tips, rest atoms of the Si(111)-7x7 reconstruction can be routinely observed, probably due to a different electronic structure of the tip apex. SP-STM measurements of the Cr(001) surface showing magnetic contrast are reported. Our results reveal that the peculiar properties of these tips can be suited in a number of STM experimental situations.
  • We report the production and characterization of a form of amorphous carbon films with sp/sp2 hybridization (atomic fraction of sp hybridized species > 20%) where the predominant sp bonding appears to be (=C=C=)n cumulene. Vibrational and electronic properties have been studied by in situ Raman spectroscopy and electrical conductivity measurements. Cumulenic chains are substantially stable for temperatures lower than 250 K and they influence the electrical transport properties of the sp/sp2 carbon through a self-doping mechanism by pinning the Fermi level closer to one of the mobility gap edges. Upon heating above 250 K the cumulenic species decay to form graphitic nanodomains embedded in the sp2 amorphous matrix thus reducing the activation energy of the material. This is the first example of a pure carbon system where the sp hybridization influences bulk properties.
  • We report on how different cluster deposition regimes can be obtained and observed by in situ Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM) by exploiting deposition parameters in a pulsed laser deposition (PLD) process. Tungsten clusters were produced by nanosecond Pulsed Laser Ablation in Ar atmosphere at different pressures and deposited on Au(111) and HOPG surfaces. Deposition regimes including cluster deposition-diffusion-aggregation (DDA), cluster melting and coalescence and cluster implantation were observed, depending on background gas pressure and target-to-substrate distance which influence the kinetic energy of the ablated species. These parameters can thus be easily employed for surface modification by cluster bombardment, deposition of supported clusters and growth of films with different morphologies. The variation in cluster mobility on different substrates and its influence on aggregation and growth mechanisms has also been investigated.
  • Linear sp carbon nanostructures are gathering interest for the physical properties of one-dimensional (1D) systems. At present, the main obstacle to the synthesis and study of these systems is their instability. Here we present a simple method to obtain a solid system where linear sp chains (i.e. polyynes) in a silver nanoparticle assembly display a long term stability at ambient conditions. The presence and the behavior of linear carbon is investigated by Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) exploiting the plasmon resonance of the silver nanoparticles assembly. This model system opens the possibility to investigate an intriguing form of carbon nanostructures.
  • We report the experimental and theoretical investigation of the growth and of the structure of large carbon clusters produced in a supersonic expansion by a pulsed microplasma source. The absence of a significant thermal annealing during the cluster growth causes the formation of disordered structures where sp2 and sp hybridizations coexist for particles larger than roughly 90 atoms. Among different structures we recognize sp2 closed networks encaging sp chains. This "nutshell" configuration can prevent the fragmentation of sp species upon deposition of the clusters thus allowing the formation of nanostructured films containing carbynoid species, as shown by Raman spectroscopy. Atomistic simulations confirm that the observed Raman spectra are the signature of the sp/sp2 hybridization characteristic of the isolated clusters and surviving in the film and provide information about the structure of the sp chains. Endohedral sp chains in sp2 cages represent a novel way in which carbon nanostructures may be organized with potential interesting functional properties.
  • Nanostructured carbon films produced by supersonic cluster beam deposition have been studied by in situ Raman spectroscopy. Raman spectra show the formation of a sp2 solid with a very large fraction of sp-coordinated carbyne species showing a long-term stability under ultra high vacuum. Distinct Raman contribution from polyyne and cumulene species have been observed. The long-term stability and the behavior of carbyne-rich films under different gas exposure have been characterized showing different evolution for different sp configurations. Our experiments confirm theoretical predictions and demonstrate the possibility of easily producing a stable carbyne-rich pure carbon solid. The stability of the sp2-sp network has important implications for astrophysics and for the production of novel carbon-based systems.