• A large number of systems harboring a debris disk show evidence for a double belt architecture. One hypothesis for explaining the gap between the belts is the presence of one or more planets dynamically carving it. This work aims to investigate this scenario in systems harboring two components debris disks. All the targets in the sample were observed with the SPHERE instrument which performs high-contrast direct imaging. Positions of the inner and outer belts were estimated by SED fitting of the infrared excesses or, when available, from resolved images of the disk. Very few planets have been observed so far in debris disks gaps and we intended to test if such non-detections depend on the observational limits of the present instruments. This aim is achieved by deriving theoretical predictions of masses, eccentricities and semi-major axes of planets able to open the observed gaps and comparing such parameters with detection limits obtained with SPHERE. The relation between the gap and the planet is due to the chaotic zone around the orbit of the planet. The radial extent of this zone depends on the mass ratio between the planet and the star, on the semi-major axis and on the eccentricity of the planet and it can be estimated analytically. We apply the formalism to the case of one planet on a circular or eccentric orbit. We then consider multi-planetary systems: 2 and 3 equal-mass planets on circular orbits and 2 equal-mass planets on eccentric orbits in a packed configuration. We then compare each couple of values (M,a), derived from the dynamical analysis of single and multiple planetary models, with the detection limits obtained with SPHERE. Our results show that the apparent lack of planets in gaps between double belts could be explained by the presence of a system of two or more planets possibly of low mass and on an eccentric orbits whose sizes are below the present detection limits.
  • Direct imaging has led to the discovery of several giant planet and brown dwarf companions. These imaged companions populate a mass, separation and age domain (mass>1MJup, orbits>5AU, age<1Gyr) quite distinct from the one occupied by exoplanets discovered by the radial velocity or transit methods. This distinction could pinpoint that different formation mechanisms are at play. We aim at investigating correlations between the host star's mass and the presence of wide-orbit giant planets, and at providing new observational constraints on planetary formation models. We observed 58 young and nearby M-type dwarfs in L'-band with the VLT/NaCo instrument and used ADI algorithms to optimize the sensitivity to planetary-mass companions and to derive the best detection limits. We estimate the probability of detecting a planet as a function of its mass and physical separation around each target. We conduct a Bayesian analysis to determine the frequency of substellar companions orbiting low-mass stars, using a homogenous sub-sample of 54 stars. We derive a frequency of $4.4^{+3.2}_{-1.3}\%$ for companions with masses in the range of 2-80MJup}, and $2.3^{+2.9}_{-0.7}$\% for planetary mass companions (2-14MJup), at physical separations of 8 to 400AU for both cases. Comparing our results with a previous survey targeting more massive stars, we find evidence that substellar companions more massive than 1MJup with a low mass ratio Q with respect to their host star (Q<1%), are less frequent around low-mass stars. This may represent an observational evidence that the frequency of imaged wide-orbit substellar companions is correlated with stellar mass, corroborating theoretical expectations. On the opposite, we show statistical evidence that intermediate-mass ratio (1%<Q<5%) companion with masses >2MJup might be independent from the mass of the host star.
  • Direct imaging of circumstellar disks requires high-contrast and high-resolution techniques. The angular differential imaging (ADI) technique is one of them, initially developed for point-like sources but now increasingly applied to extended objects. This new field of application raises many questions because the disk images reduced with ADI depend strongly on the amplitude of field rotation and the ADI data reduction strategy. Both of them directly affect the disk observable properties. Our aim is to characterize the applicability and biases of some ADI data reduction strategies for different disk morphologies. A particular emphasis is placed on parameters mostly used for disks: their surface brightness, their width for a ring, and local features such as gaps or asymmetries. We first present a general method for predicting and quantifying those biases. In a second step we illustrate them for some widely used ADI algorithms applied to typical debris disk morphologies: inclined rings with various inner/outer slopes and width. Last, our aim is also to propose improvements of classical ADI to limit the biases on extended objects. Simulated disks seen under various observing conditions were used to reduce ADI data and quantify the resulting biases. These conclusions complements previous results from NaCo L' real-disk images of HR4796A. ADI induces flux losses on disks. This makes this technique appropriate only for low- to medium-inclination disks. A theoretical criterion is derived to predict the amount of flux loss for a given disk morphology, and quantitative estimates of the biases are given in some specific configurations. These biases alter the disk observable properties, such as the slopes of their surface brightness or their radial/azimuthal extent. Additionally, this work demonstrates that ADI can very easily create artificial features without involving astrophysical processes.
  • Context. High contrast imaging is a powerful technique to search for gas giant planets and brown dwarfs orbiting at separation larger than several AU. Around solar-type stars, giant planets are expected to form by core accretion or by gravitational instability, but since core accretion is increasingly difficult as the primary star becomes lighter, gravitational instability would be the a probable formation scenario for yet-to-be-found distant giant planets around a low-mass star. A systematic survey for such planets around M dwarfs would therefore provide a direct test of the efficiency of gravitational instability. Aims. We search for gas giant planets orbiting around late-type stars and brown dwarfs of the solar neighborhood. Methods. We obtained deep high resolution images of 16 targets with the adaptive optic system of VLT-NACO in the Lp band, using direct imaging and angular differential imaging. This is currently the largest and deepest survey for Jupiter-mass planets around Mdwarfs. We developed and used an integrated reduction and analysis pipeline to reduce the images and derive our 2D detection limits for each target. The typical contrast achieved is about 9 magnitudes at 0.5" and 11 magnitudes beyond 1". For each target we also determine the probability of detecting a planet of a given mass at a given separation in our images. Results. We derived accurate detection probabilities for planetary companions, taking into account orbital projection effects, with in average more than 50% probability to detect a 3MJup companion at 10AU and a 1.5MJup companion at 20AU, bringing strong constraints on the existence of Jupiter-mass planets around this sample of young M-dwarfs.
  • Recent sub-millimetric observations at the Plateau de Bure interferometer evidenced a cavity at ~ 46 AU in radius into the proto-planetary disk around the T Tauri star LkCa15 (V1079 Tau), located in the Taurus molecular cloud. Additional Spitzer observations have corroborated this result possibly explained by the presence of a massive (>= 5 MJup) planetary mass, a brown dwarf or a low mass star companion at about 30 AU from the star. We used the most recent developments of high angular resolution and high contrast imaging to search directly for the existence of this putative companion, and to bring new constraints on its physical and orbital properties. The NACO adaptive optics instrument at VLT was used to observe LkCa15 using a four quadrant phase mask coronagraph to access small angular separations at relatively high contrast. A reference star at the same parallactic angle was carefully observed to optimize the quasi-static speckles subtraction (limiting our sensitivity at less than 1.0). Although we do not report any positive detection of a faint companion that would be responsible for the observed gap in LkCa15's disk (25-30 AU), our detection limits start constraining its probable mass, semi-major axis and eccentricity. Using evolutionary model predictions, Monte Carlo simulations exclude the presence of low eccentric companions with masses M >= 6 M Jup and orbiting at a >= 100 AU with significant level of confidence. For closer orbits, brown dwarf companions can be rejected with a detection probability of 90% down to 80 AU (at 80% down to 60 AU). Our detection limits do not access the star environment close enough to fully exclude the presence of a brown dwarf or a massive planet within the disk inner activity (i.e at less than 30 AU). Only, further and higher contrast observations should unveil the existence of this putative companion inside the LkCa15 disk.
  • The transiting extrasolar planet XO-3b is remarkable, with a high mass and eccentric orbit. The unusual characteristics make it interesting to test whether its orbital plane is parallel to the equator of its host star, as it is observed for other transiting planets. We performed radial velocity measurements of XO-3 with the SOPHIE spectrograph at the 1.93-m telescope of Haute-Provence Observatory during a planetary transit, and at other orbital phases. This allowed us to observe the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect and, together with a new analysis of the transit light curve, to refine the parameters of the planet. The unusual shape of the radial velocity anomaly during the transit provides a hint for a nearly transverse Rossiter-McLaughlin effect. The sky-projected angle between the planetary orbital axis and the stellar rotation axis should be lambda = 70 +/- 15 degrees to be compatible with our observations. This suggests that some close-in planets might result from gravitational interaction between planets and/or stars rather than migration due to interaction with the accretion disk. This surprising result requires confirmation by additional observations, especially at lower airmass, to fully exclude the possibility that the signal is due to systematic effects.
  • In this paper, we report a refined determination of the orbital parameters and the detection of the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect of the recently discovered transiting exoplanet HD147506b (HAT-P-2b). The large orbital eccentricity at the short orbital period of this exoplanet is unexpected and is distinguishing from other known transiting exoplanets. We performed high-precision radial velocity spectroscopic observations of HD147506 (HAT-P-2) with the new spectrograph SOPHIE, mounted on the 1.93 m telescope at the Haute-Provence observatory (OHP). We obtained 63 new measurements, including 35 on May 14 and 20 on June 11, when the planet was transiting its parent star. The radial velocity (RV) anomaly observed illustrates that HAT-P-2b orbital motion is set in the same direction as its parent star spin. The sky-projected angle between the normal of the orbital plane and the stellar spin axis, \lambda = 0.2 +12.2 -12.5 deg, is consistent with zero. The planetary and stellar radii were re-determined, yielding R_p = 0.951 +0.039 -0.053 R_Jup, R_s = 1.416 +0.040 -0.062 R_Sun. The mass M_p = 8.62 +0.39 -0.55 M_Jup and radius of HAT-P-2b indicate a density of 12.5 +2.6 -3.6 g cm^{-3}, suggesting an object in between the known close-in planets with typical density of the order of 1 g cm^{-3}, and the very low-mass stars, with density greater than 50 g cm^{-3}.
  • We present here the detection of a brown dwarf orbiting the A9V star HD180777. The radial velocity measurements, obtained with the ELODIE echelle spectrograph at the Haute-Provence Observatory, show a main variation with a period of 28.4 days. Assuming a primary mass of 1.7 Mo, the best Keplerian fit to the data leads to a minimum mass of 25 MJup for the companion (the true mass could be significantly higher). We also show that, after substraction of the Keplerian solution from the radial velocity measurements, the residual radial velocities are related to phenomena intrinsic to the star, namely pulsations with typical periods of Gamma Dor stars. These results show that in some cases, it is possible to disentangle radial velocity variations due to a low mass companion from variations intrinsic to the observed star.
  • In the frame of the search for extrasolar planets and brown dwarfs around early-type stars, we present the results obtained on Beta-Pictoris, which is surrounded by a circumstellar disk that is warped by the presence of a planet. We used 97 spectra acquired with CORALIE and 230 spectra acquired with HARPS to characterize the radial velocity behavior of Beta-Pictoris and to infer constraints on the presence of a planet close to this star. With these data, we were able to exclude the presence of an inner giant planet (2 MJup at a distance to the star of 0.05 AU, 9 MJup at 1 AU). We also discuss the origin of the observed radial velocity variations in terms of Delta-Scuti type pulsations.
  • We present here the detection of a planet orbiting around the F6V star HD 33564. The radial velocity measurements, obtained with the ELODIE echelle spectrograph at the Haute-Provence Observatory, show a variation with a period of 388 days. Assuming a primary mass of 1.25 Mo, the best Keplerian fit to the data leads to a minimum mass of 9.1 MJup for the companion.
  • We present the performances of a radial velocity measurement method that we developed for A-F type stars. These perfomances are evaluated through an extensive set of simulations, together with actual radial velocity observations of such stars using the ELODIE and HARPS spectrographs. We report the case of stars constant in radial velocity, the example of a binary detection on HD 48097 (an A2V star, with vsini equal to 90 km/s) and a confirmation of the existence of a 3.9 MJup planet orbiting around HD 120136 (Tau Boo). The instability strip problem is also discussed. We show that with this method, it is in principle possible to detect planets and brown dwarfs around A-F type stars, thus allowing further study of the impact of stellar masses on planetary system formation over a wider range of stellar masses than is currently done.