• Context. The importance of the magnetic field in high-mass-star formation is not yet fully clear and there are still many open questions concerning its role in the accretion processes and generation of jets and outflows. In the past few years, masers have been successfully used to probe the magnetic field morphology and strength at scales of a few au around massive protostars, by measuring linear polarisation angles and Zeeman splitting. The massive protostar IRAS 18089-1732 is a well studied high-mass-star forming region, showing a hot core chemistry and a disc-outflow system. Previous SMA observations of polarised dust revealed an ordered magnetic field oriented around the disc of IRAS 18089-1732. Aims. We want to determine the magnetic field in the dense region probed by 6.7 GHz methanol maser observations and compare it with observations in dust continuum polarisation, to investigate how the magnetic field in the compact maser region relates to the large-scale field around massive protostars. Methods. We reduced MERLIN observations at 6.7 GHz of IRAS 18089-1732 and we analysed the polarised emission by methanol masers. Results. Our MERLIN observations show that the magnetic field in the 6.7 GHz methanol maser region is consistent with the magnetic field constrained by the SMA dust polarisation observations. A tentative detection of circularly polarised line emission is also presented. Conclusions. We found that the magnetic field in the maser region has the same orientation as in the disk. Thus the large-scale field component, even at the au scale of the masers, dominates over any small-scale field fluctuations. We obtained, from the circular polarisation tentative detection, a field strength along the line of sight of 5.5 mG which appeared to be consistent with the previous estimates.
  • We provide an update for the astrometric solution for the Type II supernova progenitor Betelgeuse using the revised Hipparcos Intermediate Astrometric Data (HIAD) of van Leeuwen, combined with existing VLA and new e-MERLIN and ALMA positions. The 2007 Hipparcos refined abscissa measurements required the addition of so-called Cosmic Noise of 2.4 mas to find an acceptable 5-parameter stochastic solution. We find that a measure of radio Cosmic Noise should also be included for the radio positions because surface inhomogeneities exist at a level significant enough to introduce additional intensity centroid uncertainty. Combining the 2007 HIAD with the proper motions based solely on the radio positions leads to a parallax of $\pi = 5.27\pm 0.78$ mas ($190^{+33}_{-25}$ pc), smaller than the Hipparcos 2007 value of $6.56\pm 0.83$ mas ($152^{+22}_{-17}$ pc; van Leeuwen 2007). Furthermore, combining the VLA and new e-MERLIN and ALMA radio positions with the 2007 HIAD, and including radio Cosmic Noise of 2.4 mas, leads to a nominal parallax solution of $4.51 \pm 0.80$ mas ($222^{+48}_{-34}$ pc), which while only $0.7\sigma$ different from the 2008 solution of Harper et al. it is $2.6\sigma$ different from the solution of van Leeuwen. An accurate and precise parallax for Betelgeuse is always going to be difficult to obtain because it is small compared to the stellar angular diameter ($\theta=44$ mas). We outline an observing strategy, utilizing future mm and sub-mm high-spatial resolution interferometry that must be used if substantial improvements in precision and accuracy of the parallax and distance are to be achieved.
  • The mechanisms responsible for heating the extended atmospheres of early-M spectral-type supergiants are poorly understood. So too is the subsequent role these mechanisms play in driving the large mass-loss rates of these stars. Here we present ALMA long (i.e., $\sim$16 km) baseline 338 GHz (0.89 mm) continuum observations of the free-free emission in the extended atmosphere of the M2 spectral-type supergiant Betelgeuse. The spatial resolution of 14 mas exquisitely resolves the atmosphere, revealing it to have a mean temperature of 2760 K at $\sim$1.3 R$_{\star}$, which is below both the photospheric effective temperature ($T_{\textrm{eff}} = 3690$ K) and the temperatures at $\sim$$2 $R$_{\star}$. This is unambiguous proof for the existence of an inversion of the mean temperature in the atmosphere of a red supergiant. The emission is clearly not spherically symmetric with two notable deviations from a uniform disk detected in both the images and visibilities. The most prominent asymmetry is located in the north-east quadrant of the disk and is spatially resolved showing it to be highly elongated with an axis-ratio of 2.4 and occupying $\sim$$5\%$ of the disk projected area. Its temperature is approximately 1000 K above the measured mean temperature at 1.3 R$_{\star}$. The other main asymmetry is located on the disk limb almost due east of the disk center and occupies $\sim$$3\%$ of the disk projected area. Both emission asymmetries are clear evidence for localized heating taking place in the atmosphere of Betelgeuse. We suggest that the detected localized heating is related to magnetic activity generated by large-scale photospheric convection.
  • We investigate the use of 183 GHz H2O masers for characterization of the physical conditions and mass loss process in the circumstellar envelopes of evolved stars. We used APEX SEPIA Band 5 to observe the 183 GHz H2O line towards 2 Red Supergiant and 3 Asymptotic Giant Branch stars. Simultaneously, we observed lines in 28SiO v0, 1, 2 and 3, and for 29SiO v0 and 1. We detected the 183 GHz H2O line towards all the stars with peak flux densities greater than 100 Jy, including a new detection from VY CMa. Towards all 5 targets, the water line had indications of being due to maser emission and had higher peak flux densities than for the SiO lines. The SiO lines appear to originate from both thermal and maser processes. Comparison with simulations and models indicate that 183 GHz maser emission is likely to extend to greater radii in the circumstellar envelopes than SiO maser emission and to similar or greater radii than water masers at 22, 321 and 325 GHz. We speculate that a prominent blue-shifted feature in the W Hya 183 GHz spectrum is amplifying the stellar continuum, and is located at a similar distance from the star as mainline OH maser emission. From a comparison of the individual polarizations, we find that the SiO maser linear polarization fraction of several features exceeds the maximum fraction allowed under standard maser assumptions and requires strong anisotropic pumping of the maser transition and strongly saturated maser emission. The low polarization fraction of the H2O maser however, fits with the expectation for a non-saturated maser. 183 GHz H2O masers can provide strong probes of the mass loss process of evolved stars. Higher angular resolution observations of this line using ALMA Band 5 will enable detailed investigation of the emission location in circumstellar envelopes and can also provide information on magnetic field strength and structure.
  • Six billion years from now, while evolving on the asymptotic giant branch (AGB), the Sun will metamorphose from a red giant into a beautiful planetary nebula. This spectacular evolution will impact the Solar System planets, but observational confirmations of the predictions of evolution models are still elusive as no planet orbiting an AGB star has yet been discovered. The nearby AGB red giant L2 Puppis (d = 64 pc) is surrounded by an almost edge-on circumstellar dust disk. We report new observations with ALMA at very high angular resolution (18 x 15 mas) in band 7 (f ~ 350 GHz) that allow us to resolve the velocity profile of the molecular disk. We establish that the gas velocity profile is Keplerian within the central cavity of the dust disk, allowing us to derive the mass of the central star L2 Pup A, mA = 0.659 +/- 0.011 +/- 0.041 Msun (+/- 6.6%). From evolutionary models, we determine that L2 Pup A had a near-solar main sequence mass, and is therefore a close analog of the future Sun in 5 to 6 Gyr. The continuum map reveals the presence of a secondary source (B) at a radius of 2 AU contributing fB/ fA = 1.3 +/- 0.1% of the flux of the AGB star. L2 Pup B is also detected in CO emission lines at a radial velocity of vB = 12.2 +/- 1.0 km/s. The close coincidence of the center of rotation of the gaseous disk with the position of the continuum emission from the AGB star allows us to constrain the mass of the companion to mB = 12 +/- 16 MJup. L2 Pup B is most likely a planet or low mass brown dwarf with an orbital period around 5 years. Its continuum brightness and molecular emission suggest that it may be surrounded by an extended molecular atmosphere or an accretion disk. L2 Pup therefore emerges as a promising vantage point on the distant future of our Solar System.
  • Titanium dioxide, TiO$_2$, is a refractory species that could play a crucial role in the dust-condensation sequence around oxygen-rich evolved stars. To date, gas phase TiO$_2$ has been detected only in the complex environment of the red supergiant VY CMa. We aim to constrain the distribution and excitation of TiO$_2$ around VY CMa in order to clarify its role in dust formation. We analyse spectra and channel maps for TiO$_2$ extracted from ALMA science verification data. We detect 15 transitions of TiO$_2$, and spatially resolve the emission for the first time. The maps demonstrate a highly clumpy, anisotropic outflow in which the TiO$_2$ emission likely traces gas exposed to the stellar radiation field. A roughly east-west oriented, accelerating bipolar-like structure is found, of which the blue component runs into and breaks up around a solid continuum component. A distinct tail to the south-west is seen for some transitions, consistent with features seen in the optical and near-infrared. We find that a significant fraction of TiO$_2$ remains in the gas phase outside the dust-formation zone and suggest that this species might play only a minor role in the dust-condensation process around extreme oxygen-rich evolved stars like VY CMa.
  • We present initial results of very high resolution Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) observations of the $z$=3.042 gravitationally lensed galaxy HATLAS J090311.6+003906 (SDP.81). These observations were carried out using a very extended configuration as part of Science Verification for the 2014 ALMA Long Baseline Campaign, with baselines of up to 15 km. We present continuum imaging at 151, 236 and 290 GHz, at unprecedented angular resolutions as fine as 23 milliarcseconds (mas), corresponding to an un-magnified spatial scale of ~180 pc at z=3.042. The ALMA images clearly show two main gravitational arc components of an Einstein ring, with emission tracing a radius of ~1.5". We also present imaging of CO(10-9), CO(8-7), CO(5-4) and H2O line emission. The CO emission, at an angular resolution of ~170 mas, is found to broadly trace the gravitational arc structures but with differing morphologies between the CO transitions and compared to the dust continuum. Our detection of H2O line emission, using only the shortest baselines, provides the most resolved detection to date of thermal H2O emission in an extragalactic source. The ALMA continuum and spectral line fluxes are consistent with previous Plateau de Bure Interferometer and Submillimeter Array observations despite the impressive increase in angular resolution. Finally, we detect weak unresolved continuum emission from a position that is spatially coincident with the center of the lens, with a spectral index that is consistent with emission from the core of the foreground lensing galaxy.
  • The measurement of Zeeman splitting in spectral lines---both in emission and absorption---can provide direct estimates of the magnetic field strength and direction in atomic and molecular clouds, both in our own Milky Way and in external galaxies. This method will probe the magnetic field in the warm and cold neutral components of the interstellar medium, providing a complement to the extensive SKA Faraday studies planning to probe the field in the ionized components.
  • The processes leading to dust formation and the subsequent role it plays in driving mass loss in cool evolved stars is an area of intense study. Here we present high resolution ALMA Science Verification data of the continuum emission around the highly evolved oxygen-rich red supergiant VY CMa. These data enable us to study the dust in its inner circumstellar environment at a spatial resolution of 129 mas at 321 GHz and 59 mas at 658 GHz, thus allowing us to trace dust on spatial scales down to 11 R$_{\star}$ (71 AU). Two prominent dust components are detected and resolved. The brightest dust component, C, is located 334 mas (61 R$_{\star}$) South East of the star and has a dust mass of at least $2.5\times 10^{-4}$ M$_{\odot}$. It has a dust emissivity spectral index of $\beta =-0.1$ at its peak, implying that it is optically thick at these frequencies with a cool core of $T_{d}\lesssim 100$ K. Interestingly, not a single molecule in the ALMA data has emission close to the peak of this massive dust clump. The other main dust component, VY, is located at the position of the star and contains a total dust mass of $4.0 \times 10^{-5} $M$_{\odot}$. It also contains a weaker dust feature extending over $60$ R$_{\star}$ to the North with the total component having a typical dust emissivity spectral index of $\beta =0.7$. We find that at least $17\%$ of the dust mass around VY CMa is located in clumps ejected within a more quiescent roughly spherical stellar wind, with a quiescent dust mass loss rate of $5 \times 10^{-6}$ M$_{\odot} $yr$^{-1}$. The anisotropic morphology of the dust indicates a continuous, directed mass loss over a few decades, suggesting that this mass loss cannot be driven by large convection cells alone.
  • Cool, evolved stars have copious, enriched winds. The structure of these winds and the way they are accelerated is not well known. We need to improve our understanding by studying the dynamics from the pulsating stellar surface to about 10 stellar radii, where radiation pressure on dust is fully effective. Some red supergiants have highly asymmetric nebulae, implicating additional forces. We retrieved ALMA Science Verification data providing images of sub-mm line and continuum emission from VY CMa. This enables us to locate water masers with milli-arcsec precision and resolve the dusty continuum. The 658-, 321- and 325-GHz masers lie in irregular, thick shells at increasing distances from the centre of expansion. For the first time this is confirmed as the stellar position, coinciding with a compact peak offset to the NW of the brightest continuum emission. The maser shells (and dust formation zone) overlap but avoid each other on tens-au scales. Their distribution is broadly consistent with excitation models but the conditions and kinematics appear to be complicated by wind collisions, clumping and asymmetries.
  • We outline the prospects for performing pioneering radio weak gravitational lensing analyses using observations from a potential forthcoming JVLA Sky Survey program. A large-scale survey with the JVLA can offer interesting and unique opportunities for performing weak lensing studies in the radio band, a field which has until now been the preserve of optical telescopes. In particular, the JVLA has the capacity for large, deep radio surveys with relatively high angular resolution, which are the key characteristics required for a successful weak lensing study. We highlight the potential advantages and unique aspects of performing weak lensing in the radio band. In particular, the inclusion of continuum polarisation information can greatly reduce noise in weak lensing reconstructions and can also remove the effects of intrinsic galaxy alignments, the key astrophysical systematic effect that limits weak lensing at all wavelengths. We identify a VLASS "deep fields" program (total area ~10-20 square degs), to be conducted at L-band and with high-resolution (A-array configuration), as the optimal survey strategy from the point of view of weak lensing science. Such a survey will build on the unique strengths of the JVLA and will remain unsurpassed in terms of its combination of resolution and sensitivity until the advent of the Square Kilometre Array. We identify the best fields on the JVLA-accessible sky from the point of view of overlapping with existing deep optical and near infra-red data which will provide crucial redshift information and facilitate a host of additional compelling multi-wavelength science.
  • We present a comprehensive view of the W51B HII region complex and the W51C supernova remnant (SNR) using new radio observations from the VLA, VLBA, MERLIN, JCMT, and CSO along with archival data from Spitzer, ROSAT, ASCA, and Chandra. Our VLA data include the first 400 cm (74 MHz) continuum image of W51 at high resolution (88 arcsec). The 400 cm image shows non-thermal emission surrounding the G49.2-0.3 HII region, and a compact source of non-thermal emission (W51B_NT) coincident with the previously-identified OH (1720 MHz) maser spots, non-thermal 21 and 90 cm emission, and a hard X-ray source. W51B_NT falls within the region of high likelihood for the position of TeV gamma-ray emission. Using the VLBA three OH (1720 MHz) maser spots are detected in the vicinity of W51B_NT with sizes of 60 to 300 AU and Zeeman effect magnetic field strengths of 1.5 to 2.2 mG. The multiwavelength data demonstrate that the northern end of the W51B HII region complex has been partly enveloped by the advancing W51C SNR and this interaction explains the presence of W51B_NT and the OH masers. This interaction also appears in the thermal molecular gas which partially encircles W51B_NT and exhibits narrow pre-shock (DeltaV 5 km/s) and broad post-shock (DeltaV 20 km/s) velocity components. RADEX radiative transfer modeling of these two components yield physical conditions consistent with the passage of a non-dissociative C-type shock. Confirmation of the W51B/W51C interaction provides additional evidence in favor of this region being one of the best candidates for hadronic particle acceleration known thus far.
  • Convection, pulsation and magnetic fields have all been suggested as mechanisms for the transport of mass and energy from the optical photosphere of red supergiants, out to the region where the stellar wind is launched. We imaged the red supergiant Betelgeuse at 0.06-0.18 arcsec resolution, using e-MERLIN at 5.5--6.0 GHz, with a sensitivity of ~0.01 mJy/beam. Most of the radio emission comes from within an ellipse (0.235x0.218) arcsec^2 (~5x the optical radius), with a flux density of 1.62 mJy, giving an average brightness temperature ~1250 K. This radio photosphere contains two hotspots of 0.53 and 0.79 mJy/beam, separated by 90 milli-arcsec, with brightness temperatures 5400+/-600 K and 3800+/-500 K. Similar hotspots, at more than double the distance from the photosphere of those seen in any other regime, were detected by the less-sensitive `old' MERLIN in 1992, 1995 and 1996 and many exceed the photospheric temperature of 3600 K. Such brightness temperatures are high enough to emanate from pockets of chromospheric plasma. Other possibilities include local shock heating, the convective dredge-up of hot material or exceptionally cool, low density regions, transparent down to the hottest layer at ~40 milliarcsec radius. We also detect an arc 0.2--0.3 arcsec to the SW, brightness temperature ~150 K, in a similar direction to extensions seen on both smaller and larger scales in the infra-red and in CO at mm wavelengths. These preliminary results will be followed by further e-MERLIN, VLA and ALMA observations to help resolve the problem of mass elevation from 1 to 10 R* in red supergiants.
  • Cool, evolved stars undergo copious mass loss but the details of how the matter is returned to the ISM are still under debate. We investigated the structure and evolution of the wind at 5 to 50 stellar radii from Asymptotic Giant Branch and Red Supergiant stars. 22-GHz water masers around seven evolved stars were imaged using MERLIN, at sub-AU resolution. Each source was observed at between 2 and 7 epochs (several stellar periods). We compared our results with long-term Pushchino single dish monitoring. The 22-GHz emission is located in ~spherical, thick, unevenly filled shells. The outflow velocity doubles between the inner and outer shell limits. Water maser clumps could be matched at successive epochs separated by <2 years for AGB stars, or at least 5 years for RSG. This is much shorter than the decades taken for the wind to cross the maser shell, and comparison with spectral monitoring shows that some features fade and reappear. In 5 sources, most of the matched features brighten or dim in concert from one epoch to the next. One cloud in W Hya was caught in the act of passing in front of a background cloud leading to 50-fold, transient amplification. The masing clouds are 1-2 orders of magnitude denser than the wind average and contain a substantial fraction of the mass loss in this region, with a filling factor <1%. The RSG clouds are ~10x bigger than those round the AGB stars. Proper motions are dominated by expansion, with no systematic rotation. The maser clouds survive for decades (the shell crossing time) but the masers are not always beamed in our direction. Radiative effects cause changes in flux density throughout the maser shells on short timescales. Cloud size is proportional to parent star size; clouds have a similar radius to the star in the 22-GHz maser shell. Stellar properties such as convection cells must determine the clumping scale.
  • The star-forming region W75N hosts bright OH masers that are observed to be variable. We present observations taken in 2008 of the ground-state OH maser transitions with the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) and the Multi-Element Radio-Linked Interferometer Network (MERLIN) and with the Nancay Radio Telescope in 2011. Several of the masers in W75N were observed to be flaring, with the brightest 1720-MHz maser in excess of 400 Jy. The 1720-MHz masers appear to be associated with the continuum source VLA 1, unlike the bright flaring 1665- and 1667-MHz masers, which are associated with VLA 2. The 1720-MHz masers are located in an outflow traced by water masers and are indicative of very dense molecular material near the H II region. The magnetic field strengths are larger in the 1720-MHz maser region than in most regions hosting only main-line OH masers. The density falls off along the outflow, and the order of appearance of different transitions of OH masers is consistent with theoretical models. The 1665- and 1667-MHz VLBA data are compared against previous epochs over a time baseline of over 7 years. The median maser motion is 3.5 km/s, with a scatter that is comparable to thermal turbulence. The general pattern of maser proper motions observed in the 1665- and 1667-MHz transitions is consistent with previous observations.
  • We present multi-epoch, total intensity, high-resolution images of 43GHz, v=1, J=1-0 SiO maser emission toward the Mira variable R Cas. In total we have 23 epochs of data for R Cas at approximate monthly intervals over an optical pulsation phase range from 0.158 to 1.78. These maps show a ring-like distribution of the maser features in a shell, which is assumed to be centred on the star at a radius of 1.6 to 2.3 times the stellar radii. It is clear from these images that the maser emission is significantly extended around the star. At some epochs a faint outer arc can be seen at 2.2 stellar radii. The intensity of the emission waxes and wanes during the stellar phase. Some maser features are seen infalling as well as outflowing. We have made initial comparisons of our data with models by Gray et. al. (2009).
  • The nature of maser emission means that the apparent angular size of an individual maser spot is determined by the amplification process as well as by the instrinsic size of the emitting cloud. Highly sensitive MERLIN radio interferometry images spatially and spectrally resolve water maser clouds around evolved stars. We measured the properties of clouds around the red supergiant S Per and the AGB stars IK Tau, RT Vir, U Her and U Ori, to test maser beaming theory. Spherical clouds are expected to produce an inverse relationship between maser intensity and apparent size, which would not be seen from cylindrical or slab-like regions. We analysed the maser properties, in order to estimate the saturation state, and investigated the variation of observed spot size with intensity and across the spectral line profiles. Circumstellar masers emanate from discrete clouds from about one to 20 AU in diameter depending on the star. Most of the maser features have negative excitation temperatures close to zero and modest optical depths, showing that they are mainly unsaturated. Around S Per and (at most epochs) RT Vir and IK Tau, the maser component size shrinks with increasing intensity. In contrast, the masers around U Ori and U Her tend to increase in size, with a larger scatter. The water masers from S Per, RT Vir and IK Tau are mainly beamed into spots with an observed angular size much smaller than the emitting clouds and smallest of all at the line peaks. This suggests that the masers are amplification-bounded, emanating from approximately spherical clouds. Many of the masers around U Her and U Ori have apparent sizes which are more similar to the emitting clouds and have less or no dependence on intensity, suggesting that these masers are matter-bounded. This is consistent with an origin in flattened clouds and these two stars have shown other behaviour indicating the presence of shocks.
  • We report results of an extensive observational campaign of the 6 cm formaldehyde maser in the young massive stellar object IRAS18566+0408 (G37.55+0.20) conducted from 2002 to 2009. Using Arecibo, VLA, and GBT, we discovered quasi-periodic formaldehyde flares (P ~ 237 days). Based on Arecibo observations, we also discovered correlated variability between formaldehyde (H2CO) and methanol (CH3OH) masers. The H2CO and CH3OH masers are not spatially coincident, as demonstrated by different line velocities and high angular resolution MERLIN observations. The flares could be caused by variations in the infrared radiation field, possibly modulated by periodic accretion onto a young binary system.
  • We have imaged the disc of the young star HL Tau using the VLA at 1.3 cm, with 0.08" resolution (as small as the orbit of Jupiter). The disc is around half the stellar mass, assuming a canonical gas-mass conversion from the measured mass in large dust grains. A simulation shows that such discs are gravitationally unstable, and can fragment at radii of a few tens of AU to form planets. The VLA image shows a compact feature in the disc at 65 AU radius (confirming the `nebulosity' of Welch et al. 2004), which is interpreted as a localised surface density enhancement representing a candidate proto-planet in its earliest accretion phase. If correct, this is the first image of a low-mass companion object seen together with the parent disc material out of which it is forming. The object has an inferred gas plus dust mass of approximately 14 M(Jupiter), similar to the mass of a proto-planet formed in the simulation. The disc instability may have been enhanced by a stellar flyby: the proper motion of the nearby star XZ Tau shows it could have recently passed the HL Tau disc as close as ~600 AU.
  • Using extremely deep (rms 3.3 microJy/bm) 1.4GHz sub-arcsecond resolution MERLIN + VLA radio observations of a 8'.5 by 8'.5 field centred upon the Hubble Deep Field North, in conjunction with Spitzer 24 micron data we present an investigation of the radio-MIR correlation at very low flux densities. By stacking individual sources within these data we are able to extend the MIR-radio correlation to the extremely faint (~microJy and even sub-microJy) radio source population. Tentatively we demonstrate a small deviation from the correlation for the faintest MIR sources. We suggest that this small observed change in the gradient of the correlation is the result of a suppression of the MIR emission in faint star-forming galaxies. This deviation potentially has significant implications for using either the MIR or non-thermal radio emission as a star-formation tracer at low luminosities.
  • In this paper we investigate the radio-MIR correlation at very low flux densities using extremely deep 1.4 GHz sub-arcsecond angular resolution MERLIN+VLA observations of a 8'.5 by 8'.5 field centred upon the Hubble Deep Field North, in conjunction with Spitzer 24micron data. From these results the MIR-radio correlation is extended to the very faint (~microJy) radio source population. Tentatively we detect a small deviation from the correlation at the faintest IR flux densities. We suggest that this small observed change in the gradient of the correlation is the result of a suppression of the MIR emission in faint star-forming galaxies. This deviation potentially has significant implications for using either the MIR or non-thermal radio emission as a star-formation tracer of very low luminosity galaxies.
  • MERLIN observations of 6.668-GHz methanol and both 6.031- and 6.035-GHz hydroxyl (OH) emission from the massive star-formation region ON1 are presented. These are the first methanol observations made in full polarization using 5 antennas of MERLIN, giving high resolution and sensitivity to extended emission. Maser features are found to lie at the southern edge of the ultra-compact HII region, following the known distribution of ground-state OH masers. The masers cover a region ~1 arcsec in extent, lying perpendicular to the H13CO+ bipolar outflow. Excited-state OH emission demonstrates consistent polarization angles across the strongest linearly polarized features which are parallel to the overall distribution. The linear polarizations vary between 10.0 and 18.5 per cent, with an average polarization angle of -60 deg +/- 28 deg. The strongest 6.668-GHz methanol features provide an upper limit to linear polarization of ~1 per cent. Zeeman splitting of OH shows magnetic fields between -1.1 to -5.8 mG, and a tentative methanol magnetic field strength of -18 mG is measured.
  • A 10-arcmin field around the HDF(N) contains 92 radio sources >40 uJy, resolved by MERLIN+VLA at 0".2-2".0 resolution. 55 have Chandra X-ray counterparts including 18 with a hard X-ray photon index and high luminosity characteristic of a type-II (obscured) AGN. >70% of the radio sources have been classified as starbursts or AGN using radio morphologies, spectral indices and comparisons with optical appearance and MIR emission. Starbursts outnumber radio AGN 3:1. This study extends the VO methods previously used to identify X-ray-selected obscured type-II AGN to investigate whether very luminous radio and X-ray emission originates from different phenomena in the same galaxy. The high-redshift starbursts have typical sizes of 5--10 kpc and star formation rates of ~1000 Msun/yr. There is no correlation between radio and X-ray luminosities nor spectral indices at z>~1.3. ~70% of both the radio-selected AGN and the starburst samples were detected by Chandra. The X-ray luminosity indicates the presence of an AGN in at least half of the 45 cross-matched radio starbursts, of which 11 are type-II AGN including 7 at z>1.5. This distribution overlaps closely with the X-ray detected radio sources which were also detected by SCUBA. Stacked 1.4-GHz emission at the positions of radio-faint X-ray sources is correlated with X-ray hardness. Most extended radio starbursts at z>1.3 host X-ray selected obscured AGN. Radio emission from most of these ultra-luminous objects is dominated by star formation but it contributes less than 1/3 of their X-ray luminosity. Our results support the inferences from SCUBA and IR data, that at z>1.5, star formation is an order of magnitude more extended and more copious, it is closely linked to AGN activity and it is triggered differently, compared with star formation at lower redshifts.
  • We use Virtual Observatory methods to investigate the association between radio and X-ray emission at high redshifts. Fifty-five of the 92 HDF(N) sources resolved by combining MERLIN+VLA data were detected by Chandra, of which 18 are hard enough and bright enough to be obscured AGN. The high-z population of microJy radio sources is dominated by starbursts an order of magnitude more active and more extended than any found at z<1 and at least a quarter of these simultaneously host highly X-ray-luminous obscured AGN.
  • Star-formation and the Starburst phenomenon are presented with respect to a number of nearby star-forming galaxies where our understanding of the process can be calibrated. Methods of estimating star-formation rates are discussed together with the role played in the investigation of the process by multi-wavelength studies of a few selected starburst galaxies (especially the well studied galaxy M82). Our understanding of nearby systems allows us to study the star-formation history of the Universe by observing high-redshift starburst galaxies. These begin to dominate the radio source populations at centimetric wavelengths at flux densities below a few 10s of Jy. New very sensitive, high resolution telescopes in the sub-mm and radio will revolutionize our understanding of these distant star-forming systems, some of which may contain embedded AGN.