• We present an up-to-date global analysis of data coming from neutrino oscillation and non-oscillation experiments, as available in April 2018, within the standard framework including three massive and mixed neutrinos. We discuss in detail the status of the three-neutrino (3nu) mass-mixing parameters, both known and unknown. Concerning the latter, we find that: normal ordering (NO) is favored over inverted ordering (IO) at 3sigma level; the Dirac CP phase is constrained within ~15% (~9%) uncertainty in NO (IO) around nearly-maximal CP-violating values; the octant of the largest mixing angle and the absolute neutrino masses remain undetermined. We briefly comment on other unknowns related to theoretical and experimental uncertainties (within 3nu) or possible new states and interactions (beyond 3nu).
  • In the Ratra scenario of inflationary magnetogenesis, the kinematic coupling between the photon and the inflaton undergoes a nonanalytical jump at the end of inflation. Using smooth interpolating analytical forms of the coupling function, we show that such unphysical jump does not invalidate the main prediction of the model, which still represents a viable mechanism for explaining cosmic magnetization. Nevertheless, there is a spurious result associated with the nonanaliticity of the coupling, to wit, the prediction that the spectrum of created photons has a power-law decay in the ultraviolet regime. This issue is discussed using both semiclassical approximation and smooth coupling functions.
  • Within the standard 3nu mass-mixing framework, we present an up-to-date global analysis of neutrino oscillation data (as of January 2016), including the latest available results from experiments with atmospheric neutrinos (Super-Kamiokande and IceCube DeepCore), at accelerators (first T2K anti-nu and NOvA nu runs in both appearance and disappearance mode), and at short-baseline reactors (Daya Bay and RENO far/near spectral ratios), as well as a reanalysis of older KamLAND data in the light of the "bump" feature recently observed in reactor spectra. We discuss improved constraints on the five known oscillation parameters (delta m^2, |Delta m^2|, sin^2theta_12, sin^2theta_13, sin^2theta_23), and the status of the three remaining unknown parameters: the mass hierarchy, the theta_23 octant, and the possible CP-violating phase delta. With respect to previous global fits, we find that the reanalysis of KamLAND data induces a slight decrease of both delta m^2 and sin^2theta_12, while the latest accelerator and atmospheric data induce a slight increase of |Delta m^2|. Concerning the unknown parameters, we confirm the previous intriguing preference for negative values of sin(delta) [with best-fit values around sin(delta) ~ -0.9], but we find no statistically significant indication about the theta_23 octant or the mass hierarchy (normal or inverted). Assuming an alternative (so-called LEM) analysis of NOvA data, some delta ranges can be excluded at >3 sigma, and the normal mass hierarchy appears to be slightly favored at 90% C.L. We also describe in detail the covariances of selected pairs of oscillation parameters. Finally, we briefly discuss the implications of the above results on the three non-oscillation observables sensitive to the (unknown) absolute nu mass scale: the sum of nu masses, the effective nu_e mass, and the effective Majorana mass.
  • Nuclear reactors provide intense sources of electron antineutrinos, characterized by few-MeV energy E and unoscillated spectral shape Phi(E). High-statistics observations of reactor neutrino oscillations over medium-baseline distances L ~ O(50) km would provide unprecedented opportunities to probe both the long-wavelength mass-mixing parameters (delta m^2 and theta_12) and the short-wavelength ones (Delta m^2 and theta_13), together with the subtle interference effects associated with the neutrino mass hierarchy (either normal or inverted). In a given experimental setting - here taken as in the JUNO project for definiteness - the achievable hierarchy sensitivity and parameter accuracy depend not only on the accumulated statistics but also on systematic uncertainties, which include (but are not limited to) the mass-mixing priors and the normalizations of signals and backgrounds. We examine, in addition, the effect of introducing smooth deformations of the detector energy scale, E -> E'(E), and of the reactor flux shape, Phi(E) -> Phi'(E), within reasonable error bands inspired by state-of-the-art estimates. It turns out that energy-scale and flux-shape systematics can noticeably affect the performance of a JUNO-like experiment, both on the hierarchy discrimination and on precision oscillation physics. It is shown that a significant reduction of the assumed energy-scale and flux-shape uncertainties (by, say, a factor of 2) would be highly beneficial to the physics program of medium-baseline reactor projects. Our results also shed some light on the role of the inverse-beta decay threshold, of geoneutrino backgrounds, and of matter effects in the analysis of future reactor oscillation data.
  • SHiP Collaboration: M. Anelli, S. Aoki, G. Arduini, J.J. Back, A. Bagulya, W. Baldini, A. Baranov, G.J. Barker, S. Barsuk, M. Battistin, J. Bauche, A. Bay, V. Bayliss, L. Bellagamba, G. Bencivenni, M. Bertani, O. Bezshyyko, D. Bick, N. Bingefors, A. Blondel, M. Bogomilov, A. Boyarsky, D. Bonacorsi, D. Bondarenko, W. Bonivento, J. Borburgh, T. Bradshaw, R. Brenner, D. Breton, N. Brook, M. Bruschi, A. Buonaura, S. Buontempo, S. Cadeddu, A. Calcaterra, M. Calviani, M. Campanelli, C. Capoccia, A. Cecchetti, A. Chatterjee, J. Chauveau, A. Chepurnov, M. Chernyavskiy, P. Ciambrone, C. Cicalo, G. Conti, K. Cornelis, M. Courthold, M. G. Dallavalle, N. D'Ambrosio, G. De Lellis, M. De Serio, L. Dedenko, A. Di Crescenzo, N. Di Marco, C. Dib, J. Dietrich, H. Dijkstra, D. Domenici, S. Donskov, D. Druzhkin, J. Ebert, U. Egede, A. Egorov, V. Egorychev, M.A. El Alaoui, T. Enik, A. Etenko, F. Fabbri, L. Fabbri, G. Fedorova, G. Felici, M. Ferro-Luzzi, R.A. Fini, M. Franke, M. Fraser, G. Galati, B. Giacobbe, B. Goddard, L. Golinka-Bezshyyko, D. Golubkov, A. Golutvin, D. Gorbunov, E. Graverini, J-L Grenard, A.M. Guler, C. Hagner, H. Hakobyan, J.C. Helo, E. van Herwijnen, D. Horvath, M. Iacovacci, G. Iaselli, R. Jacobsson, I. Kadenko, M. Kamiscioglu, C. Kamiscioglu, G. Khaustov, A. Khotjansev, B. Kilminster, V. Kim, N. Kitagawa, K. Kodama, A. Kolesnikov, D. Kolev, M. Komatsu, N. Konovalova, S. Koretskiy, I. Korolko, A. Korzenev, S. Kovalenko, Y. Kudenko, E. Kuznetsova, H. Lacker, A. Lai, G. Lanfranchi, A. Lauria, H. Lebbolo, J.-M. Levy, L. Lista, P. Loverre, A. Lukiashin, V.E. Lyubovitskij, A. Malinin, M. Manfredi, A. Perillo-Marcone, A. Marrone, R. Matev, E.N. Messomo, P. Mermod, S. Mikado, Yu. Mikhaylov, J. Miller, D. Milstead, O. Mineev, R. Mingazheva, G. Mitselmakher, M. Miyanishi, P. Monacelli, A. Montanari, M.C. Montesi, G. Morello, K. Morishima, S. Movtchan, V. Murzin, N. Naganawa, T. Naka, M. Nakamura, T. Nakano, N. Nurakhov, B. Obinyakov, K. Ocalan, S. Ogawa, V. Oreshkin, A. Orlov, J. Osborne, P. Pacholek, J. Panman, A. Paoloni, L. Paparella, A. Pastore, M. Patel, K. Petridis, M. Petrushin, M. Poli-Lener, N. Polukhina, V. Polyakov, M. Prokudin, G. Puddu, F. Pupilli, F. Rademakers, A. Rakai, T. Rawlings, F. Redi, S. Ricciardi, R. Rinaldesi, T. Roganova, A. Rogozhnikov, H. Rokujo, A. Romaniouk, G. Rosa, I. Rostovtseva, T. Rovelli, O. Ruchayskiy, T. Ruf, G. Saitta, V. Samoylenko, V. Samsonov, A. Sanz Ull, A. Saputi, O. Sato, W. Schmidt-Parzefall, N. Serra, S. Sgobba, M. Shaposhnikov, P. Shatalov, A. Shaykhiev, L. Shchutska, V. Shevchenko, H. Shibuya, Y. Shitov, S. Silverstein, S. Simone, M. Skorokhvatov, S. Smirnov, E. Solodko, V. Sosnovtsev, R. Spighi, M. Spinetti, N. Starkov, B. Storaci, C. Strabel, P. Strolin, S. Takahashi, P. Teterin, V. Tioukov, D. Tommasini, D. Treille, R. Tsenov, T. Tshchedrina, A. Ustyuzhanin, F. Vannucci, V. Venturi, M. Villa, Heinz Vincke, Helmut Vincke, M. Vladymyrov, S. Xella, M. Yalvac, N. Yershov, D. Yilmaz, A. U. Yilmazer, G. Vankova-Kirilova, Y. Zaitsev, A. Zoccoli
    April 20, 2015 hep-ex, physics.ins-det
    A new general purpose fixed target facility is proposed at the CERN SPS accelerator which is aimed at exploring the domain of hidden particles and make measurements with tau neutrinos. Hidden particles are predicted by a large number of models beyond the Standard Model. The high intensity of the SPS 400~GeV beam allows probing a wide variety of models containing light long-lived exotic particles with masses below ${\cal O}$(10)~GeV/c$^2$, including very weakly interacting low-energy SUSY states. The experimental programme of the proposed facility is capable of being extended in the future, e.g. to include direct searches for Dark Matter and Lepton Flavour Violation.
  • The proposed PINGU project (Precision IceCube Next Generation Upgrade) is expected to collect O(10^5) atmospheric muon and electron neutrino in a few years of exposure, and to probe the neutrino mass hierarchy through its imprint on the event spectra in energy and direction. In the presence of nonnegligible and partly unknown shape systematics, the analysis of high-statistics spectral variations will face subtle challenges that are largely unprecedented in neutrino physics. We discuss these issues both on general grounds and in the currently envisaged PINGU configuration, where we find that possible shape uncertainties at the (few) percent level can noticeably affect the sensitivity to the hierarchy. We also discuss the interplay between the mixing angle theta_23 and the PINGU sensitivity to the hierarchy. Our results suggest that more refined estimates of spectral uncertainties are needed in next-generation, large-volume atmospheric neutrino experiments.
  • The standard three-neutrino (3nu) oscillation framework is being increasingly refined by results coming from different sets of experiments, using neutrinos from solar, atmospheric, accelerator and reactor sources. At present, each of the known oscillation parameters [the two squared mass gaps (delta m^2, Delta m^2) and the three mixing angles (theta_12}, theta_13, theta_23)] is dominantly determined by a single class of experiments. Conversely, the unknown parameters [the mass hierarchy, the theta_23 octant and the CP-violating phase delta] can be currently constrained only through a combined analysis of various (eventually all) classes of experiments. In the light of recent new results coming from reactor and accelerator experiments, and of their interplay with solar and atmospheric data, we update the estimated N-sigma ranges of the known 3nu parameters, and revisit the status of the unknown ones. Concerning the hierarchy, no significant difference emerges between normal and inverted mass ordering. A slight overall preference is found for theta_23 in the first octant and for nonzero CP violation with sin delta < 0; however, for both parameters, such preference exceeds 1 sigma only for normal hierarchy. We also discuss the correlations and stability of the oscillation parameters within different combinations of data sets.
  • Proposed medium-baseline reactor neutrino experiments offer unprecedented opportunities to probe, at the same time, the mass-mixing parameters which govern $\nu_e$ oscillations both at short wavelength (delta m^2 and theta_{12}) and at long wavelength (Delta m^2 and theta_{13}), as well as their tiny interference effects related to the mass hierarchy (i.e., the relative sign of Delta m^2 and delta m^2). In order to take full advantage of these opportunities, precision calculations and refined statistical analyses of event spectra are required. In such a context, we revisit several input ingredients, including: nucleon recoil in inverse beta decay and its impact on energy reconstruction and resolution, hierarchy and matter effects in the oscillation probability, spread of reactor distances, irreducible backgrounds from geoneutrinos and from far reactors, and degeneracies between energy scale and spectrum shape uncertainties. We also introduce a continuous parameter alpha, which interpolates smoothly between normal hierarchy (alpha=+1) and inverted hierarchy (alpha=-1). The determination of the hierarchy is then transformed from a test of hypothesis to a parameter estimation, with a sensitivity given by the distance of the true case (either alpha=+1 or alpha=-1) from the undecidable case (alpha=0). Numerical experiments are performed for the specific set up envisaged for the JUNO project, assuming a realistic sample of O(10^5) reactor events. We find a typical sensitivity of ~2 sigma to the hierarchy in JUNO, which, however, can be challenged by energy scale and spectrum shape systematics, whose possible conspiracy effects are investigated. The prospective accuracy reachable for the other mass-mixing parameters is also discussed.
  • [Abridged] We use data on massive galaxy clusters ($M_{\rm cluster} > 8 \times 10^{14} h^{-1} M_\odot$ within a comoving radius of $R_{\rm cluster} = 1.5 h^{-1}\Mpc$) in the redshift range $0.05 \lesssim z \lesssim 0.83$ to place constraints, simultaneously, on the nonrelativistic matter density parameter $\Omega_m$, on the amplitude of mass fluctuations $\sigma_8$, on the index $n$ of the power-law spectrum of the density perturbations, and on the Hubble constant $H_0$, as well as on the equation-of-state parameters $(w_0,w_a)$ of a smooth dark energy component. For the first time, we properly take into account the dependence on redshift and cosmology of the quantities related to cluster physics: the critical density contrast, the growth factor, the mass conversion factor, the virial overdensity, the virial radius and, most importantly, the cluster number count derived from the observational temperature data. We show that, contrary to previous analyses, cluster data alone prefer low values of the amplitude of mass fluctuations, $\sigma_8 \leq 0.69 (1\sigma C.L.)$, and large amounts of nonrelativistic matter, $\Omega_m \geq 0.38 (1\sigma C.L.)$, in slight tension with the $\Lambda$CDM concordance cosmological model, though the results are compatible with $\Lambda$CDM at $2\sigma$. In addition, we derive a $\sigma_8$ normalization relation, $\sigma_8 \Omega_m^{1/3} = 0.49 \pm 0.06 (2\sigma C.L.)$.
  • We perform a global analysis of neutrino oscillation data, including high-precision measurements of the neutrino mixing angle theta_13 at reactor experiments, which have confirmed previous indications in favor of theta_13>0. Recent data presented at the Neutrino 2012 Conference are also included. We focus on the correlations between theta_13 and the mixing angle theta_23, as well as between theta_13 and the neutrino CP-violation phase delta. We find interesting indications for theta_23< pi/4 and possible hints for delta ~ pi, with no significant difference between normal and inverted mass hierarchy.
  • The neutrino mixing angle theta(13) is at the focus of current neutrino research. From a global analysis of the available oscillation data in a 3-neutrino framework, we previously reported [Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 141801 (2008)] hints in favor of theta(13)>0 at the 90 % C.L. Such hints are consistent with the recent indications of nu(mu)-->nu(e) appearance in the T2K and MINOS long-baseline accelerator experiments. Our global analysis of all the available data currently provides >3 sigma evidence for nonzero theta(13), with 1-sigma ranges sin^2 theta(13) = 0.021+-0.007 or 0.025+-0.007, depending on reactor neutrino flux systematics. Updated ranges are also reported for the other 3-neutrino oscillation parameters (delta m^2, sin^2 theta(12)) and (Delta m^2, sin^2 theta(23)).
  • We analyze the magnitude-redshift data of type Ia supernovae included in the Union and Union2 compilations in the framework of an anisotropic Bianchi type I cosmological model and in the presence of a dark energy fluid with anisotropic equation of state. We find that the amount of deviation from isotropy of the equation of state of dark energy, the skewness \delta, and the present level of anisotropy of the large-scale geometry of the Universe, the actual shear \Sigma_0, are constrained in the ranges -0.16 < \delta < 0.12 and -0.012 < \Sigma_0 < 0.012 (1\sigma C.L.) by Union2 data. Supernova data are then compatible with a standard isotropic universe (\delta = \Sigma_0 = 0), but a large level of anisotropy, both in the geometry of the Universe and in the equation of state of dark energy, is allowed.
  • At the previous Venice meeting NO-VE 2008, we discussed possible hints in favor of a nonzero value for the unknown neutrino mixing angle theta(13), emerging from the combination of solar and long-baseline reactor data, as well as from the combination of atmospheric, CHOOZ and long-baseline accelerator nu_mu->nu_mu data. Recent MINOS 2009 results in the nu_mu->nu_e appearance channel also seem to support such hints. A combination of all current oscillation data provides, as preferred range, sin^2 theta(13) = 0.02 +- 0.01 (1\sigma). We review several issues raised by such hints in the last year, and comment on their possible near-future improvements and tests.
  • Nailing down the unknown neutrino mixing angle theta_13 is one of the most important goals in current lepton physics. In this context, we perform a global analysis of neutrino oscillation data, focusing on theta_13, and including recent results [Neutrino 2008, Proceedings of the XXIII International Conference on Neutrino Physics and Astrophysics, Christchurch, New Zealand, 2008 (unpublished)]. We discuss two converging hints of theta_13>0, each at the level of ~1sigma: an older one coming from atmospheric neutrino data, and a newer one coming from the combination of solar and long-baseline reactor neutrino data. Their combination provides the global estimate sin^2(theta_13) = 0.016 +- 0.010 (1sigma), implying a preference for \theta_13>0 with non-negligible statistical significance (~90% C.L.). We discuss possible refinements of the experimental data analyses, which might sharpen such intriguing indication.
  • We present updated values for the mass-mixing parameters relevant to neutrino oscillations, with particular attention to emerging hints in favor of theta_13>0. We also discuss the status of absolute neutrino mass observables, and a possible approach to constrain theoretical uncertainties in neutrinoless double beta decay. Desiderata for all these issues are also briefly mentioned.
  • In core-collapse supernovae, neutrinos and antineutrinos are initially subject to significant self-interactions induced by weak neutral currents, which may induce strong-coupling effects on the flavor evolution (collective transitions). The interpretation of the effects is simplified when self-induced collective transitions are decoupled from ordinary matter oscillations, as for the matter density profile that we discuss. In this case, approximate analytical tools can be used (pendulum analogy, swap of energy spectra). For inverted neutrino mass hierarchy, the sequence of effects involves: synchronization, bipolar oscillations, and spectral split. Our simulations shows that the main features of these regimes are not altered when passing from simplified (angle-averaged) treatments to full, multi-angle numerical experiments.
  • In this followup to Phys. Rev. D 75, 053001 (2007) [arXiv:hep-ph/0608060] we report updated constraints on neutrino mass-mixing parameters, in light of recent neutrino oscillation data (KamLAND, SNO, and MINOS) and cosmological observations (WMAP 5-year and other data). We discuss their interplay with the final 0nu2beta decay results in 76-Ge claimed by part of the Heidelberg-Moscow Collaboration, using recent evaluations of the corresponding nuclear matrix elements, and their uncertainties. We also comment on the 0nu2beta limits in 130-Te recently set by Cuoricino, and on prospective limits or signals from the KATRIN experiment.
  • In the dense supernova core, self-interactions may align the flavor polarization vectors of neutrinos and antineutrinos, and induce collective flavor transformations. Different alignment ansatzes are known to describe approximately the phenomena of synchronized or bipolar oscillations, and the split of neutrino energy spectra. We discuss another phenomenon observed in some numerical experiments in inverted hierarchy, showing features akin to a low-energy split of antineutrino spectra. The phenomenon appears to be approximately described by another alignment ansatz which, in the considered scenario, reduces the (nonadiabatic) dynamics of all energy modes to only two neutrino plus two antineutrino modes. The associated spectral features, however, appear to be fragile when passing from single- to multi-angle simulations.
  • It has been speculated that quantum gravity might induce a "foamy" space-time structure at small scales, randomly perturbing the propagation phases of free-streaming particles (such as kaons, neutrons, or neutrinos). Particle interferometry might then reveal non-standard decoherence effects, in addition to standard ones (due to, e.g., finite source size and detector resolution.) In this work we discuss the phenomenology of such non-standard effects in the propagation of electron neutrinos in the Sun and in the long-baseline reactor experiment KamLAND, which jointly provide us with the best available probes of decoherence at neutrino energies E ~ few MeV. In the solar neutrino case, by means of a perturbative approach, decoherence is shown to modify the standard (adiabatic) propagation in matter through a calculable damping factor. By assuming a power-law dependence of decoherence effects in the energy domain (E^n with n = 0,+/-1,+/-2), theoretical predictions for two-family neutrino mixing are compared with the data and discussed. We find that neither solar nor KamLAND data show evidence in favor of non-standard decoherence effects, whose characteristic parameter gamma_0 can thus be significantly constrained. In the "Lorentz-invariant" case n=-1, we obtain the upper limit gamma_0<0.78 x 10^-26 GeV at 95% C.L. In the specific case n=-2, the constraints can also be interpreted as bounds on possible matter density fluctuations in the Sun, which we improve by a factor of ~ 2 with respect to previous analyses.
  • In the light of recent neutrino oscillation and non-oscillation data, we revisit the phenomenological constraints applicable to three observables sensitive to absolute neutrino masses: The effective neutrino mass in single beta decay (m_beta); the effective Majorana neutrino mass in neutrinoless double beta decay (m_2beta); and the sum of neutrino masses in cosmology (Sigma). In particular, we include the constraints coming from the first Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search (MINOS) data and from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) three-year (3y) data, as well as other relevant cosmological data and priors. We find that the largest neutrino squared mass difference is determined with a 15% accuracy (at 2-sigma) after adding MINOS to world data. We also find upper bounds on the sum of neutrino masses Sigma ranging from ~2 eV (WMAP-3y data only) to ~0.2 eV (all cosmological data) at 2-sigma, in agreement with previous studies. In addition, we discuss the connection of such bounds with those placed on the matter power spectrum normalization parameter sigma_8. We show how the partial degeneracy between Sigma and sigma_8 in WMAP-3y data is broken by adding further cosmological data, and how the overall preference of such data for relatively high values of sigma_8 pushes the upper bound of Sigma in the sub-eV range. Finally, for various combination of data sets, we revisit the (in)compatibility between current Sigma and m_2beta constraints (and claims), and derive quantitative predictions for future single and double beta decay experiments.
  • John N. Bahcall championed solar neutrino physics for many years. Thanks to his pioneering and long-lasting contributions, this field of research has not only reached maturity, but has also opened a new window on physics beyond the standard electroweak model through the phenomenon of neutrino flavor oscillations. We briefly outline some recent accomplishments in the field, and also discuss a couple of issues that do not seem to fit in the ``standard picture,'' namely, the chemical controversy at the solar surface, and possible implications of recent gallium radioactive source experiments.
  • We present a comprehensive phenomenological analysis of a vast amount of data from neutrino flavor oscillation and non-oscillation searches, performed within the standard scenario with three massive and mixed neutrinos, and with particular attention to subleading effects. The detailed results discussed in this review represent a state-of-the-art, accurate and up-to-date (as of August 2005) estimate of the three-neutrino mass-mixing parameters.
  • We present a brief review of the current status of neutrino mass and mixing parameters, based on a comprehensive phenomenological analysis of neutrino oscillation and non-oscillation searches, within the standard three-neutrino mixing framework.
  • We derive upper limits on the sum of neutrino masses from an updated combination of data from Cosmic Microwave Background experiments and Galaxy Redshifts Surveys. The results are discussed in the context of three-flavor neutrino mixing and compared with neutrino oscillation data, with upper limits on the effective neutrino mass in Tritium beta decay from the Mainz and Troitsk experiments and with the claimed lower bound on the effective Majorana neutrino mass in neutrinoless double beta decay from the Heidelberg-Moscow experiment.
  • In the context of three-flavor neutrino mixing, we present a thorough study of the phenomenological constraints applicable to three observables sensitive to absolute neutrino masses: The effective neutrino mass in Tritium beta decay (m_beta); the effective Majorana neutrino mass in neutrinoless double beta decay (m_2beta); and the sum of neutrino masses in cosmology (Sigma). We discuss the correlations among these variables which arise from the combination of all the available neutrino oscillation data, in both normal and inverse neutrino mass hierarchy. We set upper limits on m_beta by combining updated results from the Mainz and Troitsk experiments. We also consider the latest results on m_2beta from the Heidelberg-Moscow experiment, both with and without the lower bound claimed by such experiment. We derive upper limits on Sigma from an updated combination of data from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) satellite and the 2 degrees Fields (2dF) Galaxy Redshifts Survey, with and without Lyman-alpha forest data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), in models with a non-zero running of the spectral index of primordial inflationary perturbations. The results are discussed in terms of two-dimensional projections of the globally allowed region in the (m_beta,m_2beta,Sigma) parameter space, which neatly show the relative impact of each data set. In particular, the (in)compatibility between Sigma and m_2beta constraints is highlighted for various combinations of data. We also briefly discuss how future neutrino data (both oscillatory and non-oscillatory) can further probe the currently allowed regions.