• We report the detection of two new gamma-ray sources in the Fermi-LAT sky (Pass 8) at energies higher than 20 GeV, and confirmed at lower energies, using a source detection tool based on the Minimum Spanning Tree algorithm. One of these sources, at a Galactic latitude of about -4{\deg}, is a new discovery, while the other was previously reported above 50 GeV in the 2FHL catalogue. We searched for archival multi-wavelength data of possible counterparts and found interesting candidates. Both objects are radio sources and their WISE infrared colours are typical of blazars. While for the former source no optical spectra are available, for the latter a puzzling optical spectrum corresponding to a white dwarf star is found in the 6dF database. We discuss the spectral energy distributions of both sources and possible interpretations.
  • We have investigated a group of unassociated radio sources included in the 3CR cat- alogue to increase the multi-frequency information on them and possibly obtain an identification. We have carried out an observational campaign with the Swift satellite to observe with the UVOT and the XRT telescopes the field of view of 21 bright NVSS sources within the positional uncertainty region of the 3CR sources. Furthermore, we have searched in the recent AllWISE Source Catalogue for infrared sources matching the position of these NVSS sources. We have detected significant emission in the soft X-ray band for nine of the investigated NVSS sources. To all of them, and in four cases with no soft X-ray association, we have associated a WISE infrared counterpart. Eight of these infrared candidates have not been proposed earlier in the literature. In the five remaining cases our candidate matches one among a few optical candidates suggested for the same 3CR source in previous studies. No source has been detected in the UVOT filters at the position of the NVSS objects, confirming the scenario that all of them are heavily obscured. With this in mind, a spectroscopic campaign, preferably in the infrared band, will be necessary to establish the nature of the sources that we have finally identified.
  • We report on the detection of a bright, short, structured X-ray burst coming from the supernova remnant RCW 103 on 2016 June 22 caught by the Swift/BAT monitor, and on the follow-up campaign made with Swift/XRT, Swift/UVOT and the optical/NIR GROND detector. The characteristics of this flash, such as duration, and spectral shape, are consistent with typical short bursts observed from soft gamma repeaters. The BAT error circle at 68 per cent confidence range encloses the point-like X-ray source at the centre of the nebula, 1E161348-5055. Its nature has been long debated due to a periodicity of 6.67 hr in X-rays, which could indicate either an extremely slow pulsating neutron star, or the orbital period of a very compact X-ray binary system. We found that 20 min before the BAT trigger, the soft X-ray emission of 1E161348-5055 was a factor of ~100 higher than measured 2 yr earlier, indicating that an outburst had already started. By comparing the spectral and timing characteristics of the source in the two years before the outburst and after the BAT event, we find that, besides a change in luminosity and spectral shape, also the 6.67 hr pulsed profile has significantly changed with a clear phase shift with respect to its low-flux profile. The UV/optical/NIR observations did not reveal any counterpart at the position of 1E161348-5055. Based on these findings, we associate the BAT burst with 1E161348-5055, we classify it as a magnetar, and pinpoint the 6.67 hr periodicity as the magnetar spin period.
  • Blazars are radio-loud active galactic nuclei well known for their non thermal emission spanning a wide range of frequencies. The Roma-BZCAT is, to date, the most comprehensive list of these sources. We performed the cross-match of several catalogs obtained from recent surveys at different frequencies to search for new blazars. We cross-matched the 1$^{st}$ Swift-XRT Point Source catalog with the spectroscopic sample of the 9$^{th}$ Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Then, we performed further cross-matches with the catalogs corresponding to the Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty cm survey and to the AllWISE Data release, focusing on sources with infrared colors similar to those of confirmed $\gamma$-ray blazars included in the Second Fermi-LAT catalog. As a result, we obtained a preliminary list of objects with all the elements needed for a proper blazar classification according to the prescriptions of the Roma-BZCAT. We carefully investigated additional properties such as their morphology and the slope of their spectral energy distribution in the radio domain, the features shown in their optical spectrum, and the luminosity in the soft X rays to exclude generic active galactic nuclei and focus on authentic blazar-like sources. At the end of our screening we obtained a list of 15 objects with firmly established blazar properties.
  • Here we introduce GAMESH, a novel pipeline which implements self-consistent radiative and chemical feedback in a computational model of galaxy formation. By combining the cosmological chemical-evolution model GAMETE with the radiative transfer code CRASH, GAMESH can post process realistic outputs of a N-body simulation describing the redshift evolution of the forming galaxy. After introducing the GAMESH implementation and its features, we apply the code to a low-resolution N-body simulation of the Milky Way formation and we investigate the combined effects of self-consistent radiative and chemical feedback. Many physical properties, which can be directly compared with observations in the Galaxy and its surrounding satellites, are predicted by the code along the merger-tree assembly. The resulting redshift evolution of the Local Group star formation rates, reionisation and metal enrichment along with the predicted Metallicity Distribution Function of halo stars are critically compared with observations. We discuss the merits and limitations of the first release of GAMESH, also opening new directions to a full implementation of feedback processes in galaxy formation models by combining semi-analytic and numerical methods.
  • Long-duration Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) are an extremely rare outcome of the collapse of massive stars, and are typically found in the distant Universe. Because of its intrinsic luminosity ($L\sim 3 \times 10^{53}$ erg s$^{-1}$) and its relative proximity ($z=0.34$), GRB 130427A was a unique event that reached the highest fluence observed in the gamma-ray band. Here we present a comprehensive multiwavelength view of GRB 130427A with Swift, the 2-m Liverpool and Faulkes telescopes and by other ground-based facilities, highlighting the evolution of the burst emission from the prompt to the afterglow phase. The properties of GRB 130427A are similar to those of the most luminous, high-redshift GRBs, suggesting that a common central engine is responsible for producing GRBs in both the contemporary and the early Universe and over the full range of GRB isotropic energies.
  • We present the analysis of the extraordinarily bright Gamma-Ray Burst (GRB) 130427A under the hypothesis that the GRB central engine is an accretion-powered magnetar. In this framework, initially proposed to explain GRBs with precursor activity, the prompt emission is produced by accretion of matter onto a newly-born magnetar, and the observed power is related to the accretion rate. The emission is eventually halted if the centrifugal forces are able to pause accretion. We show that the X-ray and optical afterglow is well explained as the forward shock emission with a jet break plus a contribution from the spin-down of the magnetar. Our modelling does not require any contribution from the reverse shock, that may still influence the afterglow light curve at radio and mm frequencies, or in the optical at early times. We derive the magnetic field ($B\sim 10^{16}$ G) and the spin period ($P\sim 20$ ms) of the magnetar and obtain an independent estimate of the minimum luminosity for accretion. This minimum luminosity results well below the prompt emission luminosity of GRB 130427A, providing a strong consistency check for the scenario where the entire prompt emission is the result of continuous accretion onto the magnetar. This is in agreement with the relatively long spin period of the magnetar. GRB 130427A was a well monitored GRB showing a very standard behavior and, thus, is a well-suited benchmark to show that an accretion-powered magnetar gives a unique view of the properties of long GRBs.
  • We searched for gamma-ray blazar candidates among the 382 unidentified hard X-ray sources of the 3rd Palermo BAT Catalog (3PBC) obtained from the analysis of 66 months of SWIFT-BAT survey data and listing 1586 sources. We adopted a recently developed association method based on the peculiar infrared colors which characterize the gamma-ray blazars included in the second catalog of active galactic nuclei detected by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (2LAC). We used this method exploiting the data of the all-sky survey performed by the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) to establish correspondences between unidentified 3PBC sources and WISE gamma-ray blazar candidates located within the BAT positional uncertainty region at 99% confidence level. We obtained a preliminary list of candidates for which we analysed all the available data in the SWIFT archive to complement the information in the literature and in the radio, infrared and optical catalogs with the information on their optical-UV and soft X-ray emission. Requiring the presence of radio and soft X-ray counterparts consistent with the infrared positions of the selected WISE sources, as well as a blazar-like radio morphology, we finally obtained a list of 24 gamma-ray blazar candidates.
  • Here we introduce CRASH3, the latest release of the 3D radiative transfer code CRASH. In its current implementation CRASH3 integrates into the reference algorithm the code Cloudy to evaluate the ionisation states of metals, self-consistently with the radiative transfer through H and He. The feedback of the heavy elements on the calculation of the gas temperature is also taken into account, making of CRASH3 the first 3D code for cosmological applications which treats self-consistently the radiative transfer through an inhomogeneous distribution of metal enriched gas with an arbitrary number of point sources and/or a background radiation. The code has been tested in idealized configurations, as well as in a more realistic case of multiple sources embedded in a polluted cosmic web. Through these validation tests the new method has been proven to be numerically stable and convergent. We have studied the dependence of the results on a number of physical quantities such as the source characteristics (spectral range and shape, intensity), the metal composition, the gas number density and metallicity.
  • We discuss the feasibility of the detection of the 21cm forest in the diffuse IGM with the radio telescope LOFAR. The optical depth to the 21cm line has been derived using simulations of reionization which include detailed radiative transfer of ionizing photons. We find that the spectra from reionization models with similar total comoving hydrogen ionizing emissivity but different frequency distribution look remarkably similar. Thus, unless the reionization histories are very different from each other (e.g. a predominance of UV vs. x-ray heating) we do not expect to distinguish them by means of observations of the 21cm forest. Because the presence of a strong x-ray background would make the detection of 21cm line absorption impossible, the lack of absorption could be used as a probe of the presence/intensity of the x-ray background and the thermal history of the universe. Along a random line of sight LOFAR could detect a global suppression of the spectrum from z>12, when the IGM is still mostly neutral and cold, in contrast with the more well-defined, albeit broad, absorption features visible at lower redshift. Sharp, strong absorption features associated with rare, high density pockets of gas could be detected also at z~7 along preferential lines of sight.
  • Using a semi-analytical approach recently developed to model the tidal deformations of neutron stars in inspiralling compact binaries, we study the dynamical evolution of the tidal tensor, which we explicitly derive at second post-Newtonian order, and of the quadrupole tensor. Since we do not assume a priori that the quadrupole tensor is proportional to the tidal tensor, i.e. the so called "adiabatic approximation", our approach enables us to establish to which extent such approximation is reliable. We find that the ratio between the quadrupole and tidal tensors (i.e., the Love number) increases as the inspiral progresses, but this phenomenon only marginally affects the emitted gravitational waveform. We estimate the frequency range in which the tidal component of the gravitational signal is well described using the stationary phase approximation at next-to-leading post-Newtonian order, comparing different contributions to the tidal phase. We also derive a semi-analytical expression for the Love number, which reproduces within a few percentage points the results obtained so far by numerical integrations of the relativistic equations of stellar perturbations.
  • We develop a semi-analytical approach, based on the post-Newtonian expansion and on the affine approximation, to model the tidal deformation of neutron stars in the coalescence of black hole-neutron star or neutron star-neutron star binaries. Our equations describe, in a unified framework, both the system orbital evolution, and the neutron star deformations. These are driven by the tidal tensor, which we expand at 1/c^3 post-Newtonian order, including spin terms. We test the theoretical framework by simulating black hole-neutron star coalescence up to the onset of mass shedding, which we determine by comparing the shape of the star with the Roche lobe. We validate our approach by comparing our results with those of fully relativistic, numerical simulations.
  • We present the results of our analysis devoted to the research of sources emitting in the energy bands surveyed by both the Swift-BAT and the Fermi-LAT telescopes. We cross-correlate the Fermi-LAT 1-year point source catalogue (1FGL) of {\gamma}-ray sources and the second Palermo BAT catalogue (2PBC) of hard X-ray sources, establishing a correspondence between sources when their error boxes overlap. We also extract the significance value in the BAT 15-150 keV map, obtained using a dedicated software for the reduction of BAT data, in the direction of the 1FGL sources and take into account those above the significance threshold {\sigma} = 3. We obtain a sample of common sources emitting in both the hard X- and the {\gamma}-ray energy bands and evaluate its content in galactic and extragalactic objects. We assess the fraction of unidentified sources and describe in greater detail the properties of two of them, 1FGL J0137.8+5814 and 1FGL J2056.7+4938, supporting their classification as blazars after the analysis of their broad-band spectral energy distribution. We discuss the blazar content of the collected 1FGL-2PBC sources: we build its redshift distibution and compare it with that of the whole blazar population as reported in the second edition of the BZCAT blazar catalogue.
  • We present the Second Palermo Swift-BAT hard X-ray catalogue obtained by analysing data acquired in the first 54 months of the Swift mission. Using our software dedicated to the analysis of data from coded mask telescopes, we analysed the BAT survey data in three energy bands (15-30 keV, 15-70 keV, 15-150 keV), obtaining a list of 1256 detections above a significance threshold of 4.8 standard deviations. The identification of the source counterparts is pursued using two strategies: the analysis of field observations of soft X-ray instruments and cross-correlation of our catalogue with source databases.The survey covers 50% of the sky to a 15--150 keV flux limit of 1.0 x 10^-11 erg s^-1 cm^-2 and 9.2 x 10^-12 erg s^-1 cm^-2 for |b|< 10 degrees and |b|> 10 degrees, respectively. The Second Palermo Swift-BAT hard X-ray catalogue includes 1079 (86%) hard X-ray sources with an associated counterpart (26 with a double association and 2 with a triple association) and 177 BAT excesses (14%) that still lack a counterpart. The distribution of the BAT sources among the different object classes consists of 19% Galactic sources, 57% extragalactic sources, and 10% sources with a counterpart at softer energies whose nature has not yet been determined. About half of the BAT associated sources lack a counterpart in the ROSAT catalogues. This suggests that either moderate or strong absorption may be preventing their detection in the ROSAT energy band. The comparison of our BAT catalogue with the Fermi Large Area Telescope First Source Catalogue identifies 59 BAT/Fermi correspondences: 48 blazars, 3 Seyfert galaxies, 1 interacting galaxy, 3 high mass X-ray binaries, and 4 pulsars/supernova remnants. This small number of correspondences indicates that different populations make the sky shine in these two different energy bands.
  • The 2nd edition of the Roma-BZCAT is available on line at the ASDC website (http://www.asdc.asi.it/bzcat) and in the NED database. In this short paper we describe the major updates from the first edition.
  • We present the Palermo Swift-BAT hard X-ray catalogue obtained from the analysis of the the data relative to the first 39 months of the Swift mission. We have developed a dedicated software to perform data reduction, mosaicking and source detection on the BAT survey data. We analyzed the BAT dataset in three energy bands (14-150 keV, 14-30 keV, 14-70 keV), obtaining a list of 962 detections above a significance threshold of 4.8 standard deviations. The identification of the source counterparts was pursued using three strategies: cross-correlation with published hard X-ray catalogues, analysis of field observations of soft X-ray instruments, cross-correlation with the SIMBAD databases. The survey covers 90% of the sky down to a flux limit of 2.5x10E-11 erg/cm2/s and 50% of the sky down to a flux limit of 1.8x10E-11 erg/cm2/s in the 14-150 keV band. We derived a catalogue of 754 identified sources, of which ~69% are extragalactic, ~27% are Galactic objects, ~4% are already known X-ray or gamma ray emitters whose nature has not been determined yet. The integrated flux of the extragalactic sample is ~1% of the Cosmic X-ray background in the 14-150 keV range.
  • We present a new catalogue of blazars based on multi-frequency surveys and on an extensive review of the literature. Blazars are classified as BL Lacertae objects, as flat spectrum radio quasars or as blazars of uncertain/transitional type. Each object is identified by a root name, coded as BZB, BZQ and BZU for these three subclasses respectively, and by its coordinates. This catalogue is being built as a tool useful for the identification of the extragalactic sources that will be detected by present and future experiments for X and gamma-ray astronomy, like Swift, AGILE, Fermi-GLAST and Simbol-X. An electronic version is available from the ASI Science Data Center web site at http://www.asdc.asi.it/bzcat
  • In this paper we present CRASH_alpha, the first radiative transfer code for cosmological application that follows the parallel propagation of Ly_alpha and ionizing photons. CRASH_alpha is a version of the continuum radiative transfer code CRASH with a new algorithm to follow the propagation of Ly_alpha photons through a gas configuration whose ionization structure is evolving. The implementation introduces the time evolution for Ly_alpha photons (a feature commonly neglected in line radiative transfer codes) and, to reduce the computational time needed to follow each scattering, adopts a statistical approach to the Ly_alpha treatment by making extensive use of pre-compiled tables. With this statistical approach we experience a drastic increase of the computational speed and, at the same time, an excellent agreement with the full Ly_alpha radiative transfer computations of the code MCLy_alpha. We find that the emerging spectra keep memory of the ionization history which generates a given ionization configuration of the gas and, to properly account for this effect, a self-consistent joint evolution of line and ionizing continuum radiation as implemented in CRASH_alpha is necessary. A comparison between the results from our code and from Ly_alpha scattering alone on a fixed HI density field shows that the extent of the difference between the emerging spectra depends on the particular configuration considered, but it can be substantial and can thus affect the physical interpretation of the problem at hand. These differences should furthermore be taken into account when computing the impact of the Ly_alpha radiation on e.g. the observability of the 21 cm line from neutral hydrogen at epochs preceeding complete reionization.
  • We studied the temporal and spectral evolution of the synchrotron emission from the high energy peaked BL Lac object 1E 1207.9+3945. Two recent observations have been performed by the XMM-Newton and Swift satellites; we carried out X-ray spectral analysis for both of them, and photometry in optical-ultraviolet filters for the Swift one. Combining the results thus obtained with archival data we built the long-term X-ray light curve, spanning a time interval of 26 years, and the Spectral Energy Distribution (SED) of this source. The light curve shows a large flux increasing, about a factor of six, in a time interval of a few years. After reaching its maximum in coincidence with the XMM-Newton pointing in December 2000 the flux decreased in later years, as revealed by Swift. The very good statistics available in the 0.5-10 keV XMM-Newton X-ray spectrum points out a highly significant deviation from a single power law. A log-parabolic model with a best fit curvature parameter of 0.25 and a peak energy at ~1 keV describes well the spectral shape of the synchrotron emission. The simultaneous fit of Swift UVOT and XRT data provides a milder curvature (b~0.1) and a peak at higher energies (~15 keV), suggesting a different state of source activity. In both cases UVOT data support the scenario of a single synchrotron emission component extending from the optical/UV to the X-ray band. New X-ray observations are important to monitor the temporal and spectral evolution of the source; new generation gamma-ray telescopes like AGILE and GLAST could for the first time detect its inverse Compton emission.
  • We investigate the possibility of constraining the ionization state of the intergalactic medium (IGM) close to the end of reionization (z ~ 6) by measuring the size of the HII regions in high-z quasars spectra. We perform a combination of multiphase smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) and 3D radiative transfer (RT) simulations to reliably predict the properties of typical high-z quasar HII regions, embedded in a partly neutral IGM (x_HI=0.1). In this work we assume a fixed configuration for the quasar lifetime and luminosity, i.e. t_Q=10^7 yr and N_gamma=5.2 10^56 s-1. From the analysis of mock spectra along lines of sight through the simulated QSO environment, we find that the HII region size derived from quasar spectra is on average 30 per cent smaller than the physical one. Additional maximum likelihood analysis shows that this offset induces an overestimate of the neutral hydrogen fraction, x_HI, by a factor of 3. By applying the same statistical method to a sample of observed QSOs our study favors a mostly ionized (x_HI < 0.06) universe at z=6.1.
  • We present the results of a spectral analysis of 5 Swift XRT and UVOT observations of the BL Lac object PKS 0548-322 carried out over the period April-June 2005. The X-ray flux of this high energy peaked BL Lac (HBL) source was found to be approximately constant at a level of F(2-10 keV) ~ 4x10^-11 erg cm^-2 s^-1, a factor of 2 brighter than when observed by BeppoSAX in 1999 and close to the maximum intensity reported in the Einstein Slew Survey. The very good statistics obtained in the 0.3-10 keV Swift X-ray spectrum allowed us to detect highly significant deviations from a simple power law spectral distribution. A log-parabolic model describes well the X-ray data and gives a best fit curvature parameter of 0.18 and peak energy in the Spectral Energy Distribution of about 2 keV. The UV spectral data from Swift UVOT join well with a power law extrapolation of the soft X-ray data points suggesting that the same component is responsible for the observed emission in the two bands. The combination of synchrotron peak in the X-ray band and high intensity state confirms PKS 0548-322 as a prime target for TeV observations. X-ray monitoring and coordinated TeV campaigns are highly advisable.
  • We address the topic of the Intra-Night Optical Variability of the BL Lac object S5 0716+714. To this purpose a long term observational campaign was performed, from 1996 to 2003, which allowed the collection of a very large data set, containing 10,675 photometric measurements obtained in 102 nights. The source brightness varied in a range of about 2 mag, although the majority of observations were performed when it was in the range 13.0 < R < 13.75. Variability time scales were estimated from the rates of magnitude variation, which were found to have a distribution function well fitted by an exponential law with a mean value of 0.027 mag/h, corresponding to an e-folding time scale of the flux tau_F = 37.6 h. The highest rates of magnitude variation were around 0.10--0.12 mag/h and lasted less than 2 h. These rates were observed only when the source had an R magnitude < 13.4, but this finding cannot be considered significant because of the low statistical occurrence. The distribution of tau_F has a well defined modal value at 19 h. Assuming the recent estimate of the beaming factor delta about 20, we derived a typical size of the emitting region of about 5 times 10^{16}/(1 + z) cm. The possibility to search for a possible correlation between the mean magnitude variation rate and the long term changes of the velocity of superluminal components in the jet is discussed.
  • Strong observational evidence for a fluctuating ultraviolet background (UVB) has been accumulating through a number of studies of the HI and HeII Lya forest as well as accurate IGM metallicity measurements. UVB fluctuations could arise both from the inhomogeneous distribution of the ionizing sources and/or from radiative transfer (RT) through the filamentary IGM. In this study we investigate, via numerical simulations, the role of RT effects such as shadowing, self-shielding and filtering of the ionizing radiation, in giving raise to a fluctuating UVB. We focus on possible detectable signatures of these effects on quantities derived from Lya forest spectra, as photoionization rate fluctuations, eta parameter (the HeII to HI column density ratio) distributions and the IGM temperature at redshift about 3. We find that RT induces fluctuations up to 60% in the UVB, which are tightly correlated to the density field. The UVB mean intensity is progressively suppressed toward higher densities and photon energies above 4 Ryd, due to the high HeII opacity. Shielding of overdense regions (Delta > 5) from cosmic HeII ionizing radiation, produces a decreaseing trend of eta with overdensity. Furthermore we find that the mean eta value inferred from HI-HeII Lya forest observations can be explained only by properly accounting for the actual IGM opacity. We outline and discuss several implications of our findings.
  • Recent observations have shown that the intergalactic medium (IGM) is more transparent to Lyalpha photons close to Lyman Break Galaxies (LBGs) than at large distance from them, ie a proximity effect. Cosmological simulations including winds from LBGs have been so far unable to explain this trend. By coupling such simulations with the radiative transfer code CRASH, we investigate whether the addition of the ionizing radiation emitted by LBGs can increase the transmissivity by decreasing the neutral hydrogen fraction in the inner Mpc of the galaxy halo. The transmissivity as a function of distance is roughly reproduced only if LBGs are identified with dwarf galaxies (with masses < 10^9 solar masses), which are undergoing a vigorous (50 solar masses/yr) burst of star formation. Similar star formation rates in larger galaxies are not sufficient to overwhelm the large recombination rates associated with their denser environment. If so, photoionization partly reconciles theory with observations, although we discuss a number of uncertainties affecting both approaches.