• The Virgo Environmental Survey Tracing Ionised Gas Emission (VESTIGE) is a blind narrow-band Halpha+[NII] imaging survey carried out with MegaCam at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope. The survey covers the whole Virgo cluster region from its core to one virial radius (104 deg^2). The sensitivity of the survey is of f(Halpha) ~ 4 x 10^-17 erg sec-1 cm^-2 (5 sigma detection limit) for point sources and Sigma (Halpha) ~ 2 x 10^-18 erg sec^-1 cm^-2 arcsec^-2 (1 sigma detection limit at 3 arcsec resolution) for extended sources, making VESTIGE the deepest and largest blind narrow-band survey of a nearby cluster. This paper presents the survey in all its technical aspects, including the survey design, the observing strategy, the achieved sensitivity in both the narrow-band Halpha+[NII] and in the broad-band r filter used for the stellar continuum subtraction, the data reduction, calibration, and products, as well as its status after the first observing semester. We briefly describe the Halpha properties of galaxies located in a 4x1 deg^2 strip in the core of the cluster north of M87, where several extended tails of ionised gas are detected. This paper also lists the main scientific motivations of VESTIGE, which include the study of the effects of the environment on galaxy evolution, the fate of the stripped gas in cluster objects, the star formation process in nearby galaxies of different type and stellar mass, the determination of the Halpha luminosity function and of the Halpha scaling relations down to ~ 10^6 Mo stellar mass objects, and the reconstruction of the dynamical structure of the Virgo cluster. This unique set of data will also be used to study the HII luminosity function in hundreds of galaxies, the diffuse Halpha+[NII] emission of the Milky Way at high Galactic latitude, and the properties of emission line galaxies at high redshift.
  • We present results from deep and very spatially extended CTIO/DECam $g$ and $r$ photometry (reaching out to $\sim$ 2 mag below the oldest MSTO and covering $\sim$ 20 deg$^2$) around the Sextans dSph. We use this data-set to study the structural properties of Sextans overall stellar population and its different stellar evolutionary phases, as well as to search for signs of tidal disturbance from the MW, which would indicate departure from dynamical equilibrium. We perform the most accurate structural analysis to-date of Sextans' stellar components by applying Bayesian MCMC methods to the individual stars' positions. Surface density maps are built by decontaminating the sample through a matched filter analysis of the CMD, and then analysed for departures from axisymmetry. Sextans is found to be considerably less spatially extended than early studies suggested. No significant distortions or tidal disturbances are found down to a surface brightness of $\sim$ 31.8 mag/arcsec$^{-2}$ in V-band. We identify an overdensity in the central regions that may correspond to previously reported kinematic substructure(s). In agreement with previous findings, old $\&$ metal-poor stars such as BHB stars cover a much larger area than stars in other evolutionary phases, and bright BSs are less spatially extended than faint ones. However, the different spatial distribution of bright and faint BSs appears consistent with the general age/metallicity gradients found in Sextans' stellar component. This is compatible with BSs having formed by evolution of binaries and not necessarily due to the presence of a central disrupted globular cluster, as suggested in the literature. We provide structural parameters for the various populations analyzed and make publicly available the photometric catalogue of point-sources as well as a catalogue of literature spectroscopic measurements with updated membership probabilities.
  • The Pristine survey is a narrow-band, photometric survey focused around the wavelength region of the Ca II H & K absorption lines, designed to efficiently search for extremely metal-poor stars. In this work, we use the first results of a medium-resolution spectroscopic follow-up to refine the selection criteria for finding extremely metal-poor stars ($\textrm{[Fe/H]} \leq -3.0$) in the Pristine survey. We consider methods by which stars can be selected from available broad-band and infrared photometry plus the additional Pristine narrow-band photometry. The spectroscopic sample presented in this paper consists of 205 stars in the magnitude range $14 < V < 18$. Applying the photometric selection criteria cuts the sample down to 149 stars, and from these we report a success rate of 70% for finding stars with $\textrm{[Fe/H]} \leq -2.5$ and 22% for finding stars with $\textrm{[Fe/H]} \leq -3.0$. These statistics compare favourably with other surveys that search for extremely metal-poor stars, namely an improvement by a factor of $\sim 4-5$ for recovering stars with $\textrm{[Fe/H]} \leq -3.0$. In addition, Pristine covers a fainter magnitude range than its predecessors, and can thus probe deeper into the Galactic halo.
  • Aims: for the first time the astrometric capabilities of the Multi-Conjugate Adaptive Optics (MCAO) facility GeMS with the GSAOI camera on Gemini-South are tested to quantify the accuracy in determining stellar proper motions in the Galactic globular cluster NGC 6681. Methods: proper motions from HST/ACS for a sample of its stars are already available, and this allows us to construct a distortion-free reference at the epoch of GeMS observations that is used to measure and correct the temporally changing distortions for each GeMS exposure. In this way, we are able to compare the corrected GeMS images with a first-epoch of HST/ACS images to recover the relative proper motion of the Sagittarius dwarf spheroidal galaxy with respect to NGC 6681. Results: we find this to be (\mu_{\alpha}cos\delta, \mu_{\delta}) = (4.09,-3.41) mas/yr, which matches previous HST/ACS measurements with a very good accuracy of 0.03 mas/yr and with a comparable precision (r.m.s of 0.43 mas/yr). Conclusions: this study successfully demonstrates that high-quality proper motions can be measured for quite large fields of view (85 arcsec X 85 arcsec) with MCAO-assisted, ground-based cameras and provides a first, successful test of the performances of GeMS on multi-epoch data.
  • Globular clusters are the oldest stellar systems in the Milky Way and probe the early epoch of the Galaxy formation. However, the uncertainties on their absolute age are still too large to soundly constrain how the Galactic structures have assembled. The aim of this work is to obtain an accurate estimate of the absolute age of the globular cluster NGC 2808 using deep IR data obtained with the multi conjugate adaptive optics system operating at the Gemini South telescope (GeMS). This exquisite photometry, combined with that obtained in V and I bands with HST, allowed us the detection of the faint Main Sequence Knee feature in NGC 2808 colour magnitude diagram. The difference between this point and the main sequence turn off is a good age estimator and provides ages with unprecedented accuracy. We found that NGC 2808 has an age of t=10.9\pm0.7 (intrinsic) \pm0.45 (metallicity term) Gyr. A possible contamination by He-enhanced population could make the cluster up to 0.25 Gyr older. Although this age estimate agrees with the age coming from the classical turn off method (t=11.0 Gyr), its uncertainty is a factor ~3 better, since it avoids systematics in reddening, distance assumptions and photometric zero points determination. The final absolute age indicates that NGC 2808 is slightly younger than other Galactic globular clusters with similar metallicity.
  • We present a detailed kinematic analysis of the outer halo globular cluster (GC) system of M31. Our basis for this is a set of new spectroscopic observations for 78 clusters lying at projected distances between Rproj ~20-140 kpc from the M31 centre. These are largely drawn from the recent PAndAS globular cluster catalogue; 63 of our targets have no previous velocity data. Via a Bayesian maximum likelihood analysis we find that GCs with Rproj > 30 kpc exhibit coherent rotation around the minor optical axis of M31, in the same direction as more centrally- located GCs, but with a smaller amplitude of 86+/-17 km s-1. There is also evidence that the velocity dispersion of the outer halo GC system decreases as a function of projected distance from the M31 centre, and that this relation can be well described by a power law of index ~ -0.5. The velocity dispersion profile of the outer halo GCs is quite similar to that of the halo stars, at least out to the radius up to which there is available information on the stellar kinematics. We detect and discuss various velocity correlations amongst subgroups of GCs that lie on stellar debris streams in the M31 halo. Many of these subgroups are dynamically cold, exhibiting internal velocity dispersions consistent with zero. Simple Monte Carlo experiments imply that such configurations are unlikely to form by chance, adding weight to the notion that a significant fraction of the outer halo GCs in M31 have been accreted alongside their parent dwarf galaxies. We also estimate the M31 mass within 200 kpc via the Tracer Mass Estimator, finding (1.2 - 1.6) +/- 0.2 10^{12}M_sun. This quantity is subject to additional systematic effects due to various limitations of the data, and assumptions built in into the TME. Finally, we discuss our results in the context of formation scenarios for the M31 halo.
  • We report the discovery of 59 globular clusters (GCs) and two candidate GCs in a search of the halo of M31, primarily via visual inspection of CHFT/MegaCam imagery from the Pan-Andromeda Archaeological Survey (PAndAS). The superior quality of these data also allow us to check the classification of remote objects in the Revised Bologna Catalogue (RBC), plus a subset of GC candidates drawn from SDSS imaging. We identify three additional new GCs from the RBC, and confirm the GC nature of 11 SDSS objects (8 of which appear independently in our remote halo catalogue); the remaining 188 candidates across both lists are either foreground stars or background galaxies. Our new catalogue represents the first uniform census of GCs across the M31 halo - we find clusters to the limit of the PAndAS survey area at projected radii of up to R_proj ~ 150 kpc. Tests using artificial clusters reveal that detection incompleteness cuts in at luminosities below M_V = -6.0; our 50% completeness limit is M_V ~ -4.1. We construct a uniform set of PAndAS photometric measurements for all known GCs outside R_proj = 25$ kpc, and any new GCs within this radius. With these data we update results from Huxor et al. (2011), investigating the luminosity function (LF), colours and effective radii of M31 GCs with a particular focus on the remote halo. We find that the GCLF is clearly bimodal in the outer halo (R_proj > 30 kpc), with the secondary peak at M_V ~ -5.5. We argue that the GCs in this peak have most likely been accreted along with their host dwarf galaxies. Notwithstanding, we also find, as in previous surveys, a substantial number of GCs with above-average luminosity in the outer M31 halo - a population with no clear counterpart in the Milky Way.
  • Using data from the Pan-Andromeda Archaeological Survey (PAndAS), we have discovered four new globular clusters (GCs) associated with the M31 dwarf elliptical (dE) satellites NGC 147 and NGC 185. Three of these are associated with NGC 147 and one with NGC 185. All lie beyond the main optical boundaries of the galaxies and are the most remote clusters yet known in these systems. Radial velocities derived from low resolution spectra are used to argue that the GCs are bound to the dwarfs and are not part of the M31 halo population. Combining PAndAS with UKIRT/WFCAM data, we present the first homogeneous optical and near-IR photometry for the entire GC systems of these dEs. Colour-colour plots and published colour-metallicity relations are employed to constrain GC ages and metallicities. It is demonstrated that the clusters are in general metal poor ([Fe/H] < -1.25 dex), while the ages are more difficult to constrain. The mean (V-I)$_0$ colours of the two GC systems are very similar to those of the GC systems of dEs in the Virgo and Fornax clusters, as well as the extended halo GC population in M31. The new clusters bring the GC specific frequency (S_N) to ~9 in NGC 147 and ~5 in NGC 185, consistent with values found for dEs of similar luminosity residing in a range of environments.
  • We present the first kinematic analysis of the far outer halo globular cluster (GC) population in the Local Group galaxy M31. Our sample contains 53 objects with projected radii of ~20-130 kpc, of which 44 have no previous spectroscopic information. GCs with projected radii >30 kpc are found to exhibit net rotation around the minor axis of M31, in the same sense as the inner GCs, albeit with a smaller amplitude of 79 +/-19 km/s. The rotation-corrected velocity dispersion of the full halo GC sample is 106 +/-12 km/s, which we observe to decrease with increasing projected radius. We find compelling evidence for kinematic-coherence amongst GCs which project on top of halo substructure, including a clear signature of infall for GCs lying along the North-West stream. Using the tracer mass estimator, we estimate the dynamical mass of M31 within 200 kpc to be M_M31 = (1.2-1.5) +/- 0.2 x 10^12 M_sun. This value is highly dependent on the chosen model and assumptions within.
  • We present results from a spectroscopic survey of the dwarf spheroidal And XXII and the two extended clusters EC1 and EC2. These three objects are candidate satellites of the Triangulum galaxy, M33, which itself is likely a satellite of M31. We use the DEep Imaging Multi-Object Spectrograph mounted on the Keck-II telescope to derive radial velocities for candidate member stars of these objects and thereby identify the stars that are most likely actual members. Eleven most probable stellar members (of 13 candidates) are found for AndXXII. We obtain an upper limit of sigma_v < 6.0 km s-1 for the velocity dispersion of AndXXII, [Fe/H] ~ -1.6 for its metallicity, and 255pc for the Plummer radius of its projected density profile. We construct a colour magnitude diagram for AndXXII and identify both the red giant branch and the horizontal branch. The position of the latter is used to derive a heliocentric distance to And XXII of 853 pm 26 kpc. The combination of the radial velocity, distance, and angular position of AndXXII indicates that it is a strong candidate for being the first known satellite of M33 and one of the very few examples of a galactic satellite of a satellite. N-body simulations imply that this conclusion is unchanged even if M31 and M33 had a strong encounter in the past few Gyr. We test the hypothesis that the extended clusters highlight tidally stripped galaxies by searching for an excess cloud of halo-like stars in their vicinity. We find such a cloud for the case of EC1 but not EC2. The three objects imply a dynamical mass for M33 that is consistent with previous estimates.
  • We present the results of a spectroscopic survey of the recently discovered M31 satellites And XV and And XVI, lying at projected distances from the centre of M31 of 93 and 130 kpc respectively. These satellites lie to the South of M31, in regions of the stellar halo which wide field imaging has revealed as relative voids (compared to the degree-scale coherent stream-like structures). Using the DEep Imaging Multi-Object Spectrograph mounted on the Keck II telescope, we have defined probable members of these satellites, for which we derive radial velocities as precise as ~6 km/s down to i~21.5. While the distance to And XVI remains the same as previously reported (525pm50 kpc), we have demonstrated that the brightest three stars previously used to define the tip of the red giant branch (TRGB) in And XV are in fact Galactic, and And XV is actually likely to be much more distant at 770pm70 kpc (compared to the previous 630 kpc), increasing the luminosity from MV -9.4 to MV~-9.8. The And XV velocity dispersion is resolved with vr =-339+7-6 km/s and sigma-v = 11+7-5 km/s. The And XVI dispersion is not quite resolved at 1sigma with vr =-385+5-6 km/s and sigma-v = 0+10-indef km/s. Using the photometry of the confirmed member stars, we find metallicities of And XV (median [Fe/H]=-1.58, interquar- tile range +-0.08), and And XVI (median [Fe/H]=-2.23, interquartile range +-0.12). Stacking the spectra of the member stars, we find spectroscopic [Fe/H]=-1.8 (-2.1) for And XV (And XVI), with a uncertainty of ~0.2 dex in both cases. Our measure- ments of And XV reasonably resolve its mass (~10^8 Msun) and suggest a polar orbit, while the velocity of And XVI suggests it is approaching the M31 escape velocity given its large M31-centric distance.
  • (abridged) We present a spectroscopic analysis of five stellar streams (`A', `B', `Cr', `Cp' and `D') as well as the extended star cluster, EC4, which lies within streamC, all discovered in the halo of M31 from our CFHT/MegaCam survey. These spectroscopic results were initially serendipitous, making use of our existing observations from the DEep Imaging Multi-Object Spectrograph mounted on the Keck II telescope, and thereby emphasizing the ubiquity of tidal streams that account for ~70% of the M31 halo stars in the targeted fields. Subsequent spectroscopy was then procured in streamCr/p and streamD to trace the velocity gradient along the streams. For the cluster EC4, candidate member stars with average [Fe/H]~-1.4 (Fe/H_spec=-1.6), are found at v_{hel}=-285 km/s suggesting it could be related to streamCp. No similarly obvious cold kinematic candidate is found for streamD, although candidates are proposed in both of two spectroscopic pointings along the stream (both at -400 km/s). Spectroscopy near the edge of streamB suggests a likely kinematic detection, while a candidate kinematic detection of streamA is found (plausibly associated to M33 rather than M31). The low dispersion of the streams in kinematics, physical thickness, and metallicity makes it hard to reconcile with a scenario whereby these stream structures as an ensemble are related to the giant southern stream. We conclude that the M31 stellar halo is largely made up of multiple kinematically cold streams.
  • Wide-field JHKs near-infrared observations covering an area of 1.8x1.8 sq. deg. centred on M33 were obtained using WFCAM at UKIRT. These data show a large population of intermediate-age asymptotic giant branch stars (AGB). We have used both C-type and M-type AGB stars to determine spatial variations in metallicity and mean age across the galaxy. We distinguished between C-type and M-type AGB stars from their location in the colour-magnitude diagram (J-Ks, Ks). The distribution of these stars is supported by a cross-identification between our sample and a catalogue of optically confirmed, long-period variable stars, as well as with the list of sources detected by Spitzer in the mid-infrared. We calculated the C/M ratio and the orientation of the galaxy in the sky, and compared the Ks magnitude distribution with theoretical distributions spanning a range of metallicities and star formation rates (SFRs). The C/M ratio surface map confirms a metallicity gradient in the galaxy corresponding to a spread in [Fe/H]=0.6 dex with substructures in the inner and outer galaxy. Magnitude and colour variations suggest orientation and extinction effects on the galaxy disc. Maps showing the distribution of mean age and metallicity obtained from the Ks method suggest that: the outer galaxy disc/halo is metal poorer than the nuclear region and metal-rich clumps in the inner galaxy change location with time. The average outer ring and nuclear stellar population is ~6 Gyr old while central regions are a few Gyr younger.
  • New wide-field near-infrared (NIR) imaging observations of M33 were obtained from UKIRT. These show a large population of intermediate-age stars considerably improving on previous NIR data. The spatial distribution of super giant stars, carbon-rich (C-rich or C stars) and oxygen-rich (O-rich or M stars) asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars distinguished from the NIR colour-magnitude diagram (CMD) have been studied as well as the C/M ratio. The Ks magnitude distribution has been interpreted using theoretical models to derive the mean age and the mean metallicity across M33.
  • We present spectroscopic observations of the AndXII dwarf spheroidal galaxy using DEIMOS/Keck-II, showing it to be moving rapidly through the Local Group (-556 km/s heliocentric velocity, -281 km/s relative to Andromeda from the MW), falling into the Local Group from ~115 kpc beyond Andromeda's nucleus. AndXII therefore represents a dwarf galaxy plausibly falling into the Local Group for the first time, and never having experienced a dense galactic environment. From Green Bank Telescope observations, a limit on the H{I} gas mass of <3000 Msun suggests that AndXII's gas could have been removed prior to experiencing the tides of the Local Group galaxies. Orbit models suggest the dwarf is close to the escape velocity of M31 for published mass models. AndXII is our best direct evidence for the late infall of satellite galaxies, a prediction of cosmological simulations.
  • This paper presents a study of the Cetus dwarf, an isolated dwarf galaxy within the Local Group. A matched-filter analysis of the INT/WFC imaging of this system reveals no evidence for significant tidal debris that could have been torn from the galaxy, bolstering the hypothesis that Cetus has never significantly interacted with either the Milky Way or M31. Additionally, Keck/Deimos spectroscopic observations identify this galaxy as a distinct kinematic population possessing a systematic velocity of $-87\pm2{\rm km\ s^{-1}}$ and with a velocity dispersion of $17\pm2{\rm km s^{-1}}$; while tentative, these data also suggest that Cetus possesses a moderate rotational velocity of $\sim8{\rm km s^{-1}}$. The population is confirmed to be relatively metal-poor, consistent with ${\rm [Fe/H]\sim-1.9}$, and, assuming virial equilibrium, implies that the Cetus dwarf galaxy possesses a $M/L\sim70$. It appears, therefore, that Cetus may represent a primordial dwarf galaxy, retaining the kinematic and structural properties lost by other members of the dwarf population of the Local Group in their interactions with the large galaxies. An analysis of Cetus's orbit through the Local Group indicates that it is at apocentre; taken in conjunction with the general dwarf population, this shows the mass of the Local Group to be $\gta2\times10^{12}M_\odot$.
  • We present evidence for a metal-poor, [Fe/H]$\sim-1.4$ $\sigma$=0.2 dex, stellar halo component detectable at radii from 10 kpc to 70 kpc, in our nearest giant spiral neighbor, the Andromeda galaxy. This metal-poor sample underlies the recently-discovered extended rotating component, and has no detected metallicity gradient. This discovery uses a large sample of 9861 radial velocities of Red Giant Branch (RGB) stars obtained with the Keck-II telescope and DEIMOS spectrograph, with 827 stars with robust radial velocity measurements isolated kinematically to lie in the halo component primarily by windowing out the extended rotating component which dominates the photometric profile of Andromeda out to $<$50 kpc (de-projected). The stars lie in 54 spectroscopic fields spread over an 8 square degree region, and are expected to fairly sample the halo to a radius of $\sim$70 kpc. The halo sample shows no significant evidence for rotation. Fitting a simple model in which the velocity dispersion of the component decreases with radius, we find a central velocity dispersion of $152\kms$ decreasing by $-0.90\kms/\kpc$. By fitting a cosmologically-motivated NFW halo model to the halo stars we constrain the virial mass of M31 to be greater than $9.0 \times 10^{11} \msun$ with 99% confidence. The properties of this halo component are very similar to that found in our Milky Way, revealing that these roughly equal mass galaxies may have led similar accretion and evolutionary paths in the early Universe.
  • Using data taken as part of the Isaac Newton Telescope Wide Field Camera (INT WFC) survey of M31, we have identified an arc-like overdensity of blue, presumably metal-poor, red giant branch stars in the north-west quadrant of M31. This feature is approximately 1 degree (15 kpc) in extent and has a surface brightness of Sigma_V' ~ 28.5 +/- 0.5 mags per sq. arcsec. The arc appears to emanate from the dwarf elliptical galaxy NGC205, and the colour of its red giant branch is significantly different to the M31 disk population but closely resembles that of NGC205. Further, using data taken with the DEep Imaging Multi-Object Spectrograph (DEIMOS) on Keck II, we identify the radial velocity signature of this arc. Its velocity dispersion is measured to be approximately 10km/s, similar to that of the central regions of NGC205 and typical of stellar streams. Based upon the spatial coincidence of these objects, the surface brightness, the velocity dispersions and the similarity in colour of the red giant branches, we postulate that the arc is part of a stellar stream, the progenitor of which is NGC205.
  • We present a spectroscopic survey of the giant stellar stream found in the halo of the Andromeda galaxy. Taken with the DEIMOS multi-object spectrograph on the Keck2 telescope, these data display a narrow velocity dispersion of 11+/-3 km/s, with a steady radial velocity gradient of 245 km/s over the 125 kpc radial extent of the stream studied so far. This implies that the Andromeda galaxy possesses a substantial dark matter halo. We fit the orbit of the stream in different galaxy potential models. In a simple model with a composite bulge, disk and halo, where the halo follows a ``universal'' profile that is compressed by the formation of the baryonic components, we find that the kinematics of the stream require a total mass inside 125 kpc of 7.5^(+2.5)_(-1.3) x 10^{11} M_Sun, or more than 5.4 x 10^{11} M_Sun at the 99% confidence level. This is the first galaxy in which it has been possible to measure the halo mass distribution by such direct dynamical means over such a large distance range. The resulting orbit shows that if M32 or NGC 205 are connected with the stream, they must either trail or lag the densest region of the stream by more than 100 kpc. Furthermore, according to the best-fit orbit, the stream passes very close to M31, causing its demise as a coherent structure and producing a fan of stars that will pollute the inner halo, thereby confusing efforts to measure the properties of genuine halo populations. Our data show that several recently identified planetary nebulae, which have been proposed as evidence for the existence of a new companion of M31, are likely members of the Andromeda Stream.