• V923 Sco is a bright ($V$ = 5.91), nearby ($\pi$ = 15.46$\pm$0.40 mas) southern eclipsing binary. Because both components are slow rotators, the minimum masses of the components are known with 0.2% precision from spectroscopy. The system seems ideal for very precise mass, radius, and luminosity determinations and, owing to its proximity and long orbital period ($\sim$ 34.8 days), promises to be resolved with long-baseline interferometry. The principal aim is very accurate determinations of absolute stellar parameters for both components of the eclipsing binary and a model-independent determination of the distance.} New high-precision photometry of both eclipses of V923 Sco with the MOST satellite was obtained. The system was spatially resolved with the VLTI AMBER, PIONIER, and GRAVITY instruments at nine epochs. Combining the projected size of the spectroscopic orbit (in km) and visual orbit (in mas) the distance to the system is derived. Simultaneous analysis of photometric, spectroscopic, and interferometric data was performed to obtain a robust determination of the absolute parameters. Very precise absolute parameters of the components were derived in spite of the parameter correlations. The primary component is found to be overluminous for its mass. Combining spectroscopic and interferometric observations enabled us to determine the distance to V923 Sco with better than 0.2% precision, which provides a stringent test of Gaia parallaxes. It is shown that combining spectroscopic and interferometric observations of nearby eclipsing binaries can lead to extremely accurate parallaxes and stellar parameters.
  • The development of high-contrast capabilities has long been recognized as one of the top priorities for the VLTI. As of today, the VLTI routinely achieves contrasts of a few 10$^{-3}$ in the near-infrared with PIONIER (H band) and GRAVITY (K band). Nulling interferometers in the northern hemisphere and non-redundant aperture masking experiments have, however, demonstrated that contrasts of at least a few 10$^{-4}$ are within reach using specific beam combination and data acquisition techniques. In this paper, we explore the possibility to reach similar or higher contrasts on the VLTI. After reviewing the state-of-the-art in high-contrast infrared interferometry, we discuss key features that made the success of other high-contrast interferometric instruments (e.g., integrated optics, nulling, closure phase, and statistical data reduction) and address possible avenues to improve the contrast of the VLTI by at least one order of magnitude. In particular, we discuss the possibility to use integrated optics, proven in the near-infrared, in the thermal near-infrared (L and M bands, 3-5 $\mu$m), a sweet spot to image and characterize young extra-solar planetary systems. Finally, we address the science cases of a high-contrast VLTI imaging instrument and focus particularly on exoplanet science (young exoplanets, planet formation, and exozodiacal disks), stellar physics (fundamental parameters and multiplicity), and extragalactic astrophysics (active galactic nuclei and fundamental constants). Synergies and scientific preparation for other potential future instruments such as the Planet Formation Imager are also briefly discussed.
  • Aims. The X-shooter archive of several thousand telluric star spectra was skimmed for Be and Be-shell stars to derive the stellar fundamental parameters and statistical properties, in particular for the less investigated late type Be stars, and the extension of the Be phenomenon into early A stars. Methods. An adapted version of the BCD method is used, utilizing the Balmer discontinuity parameters to determine effective temperature and surface gravity. This method is optimally suited for late B stars. The projected rotational velocity was obtained by profile fitting to the Mg ii lines of the targets, and the spectra were inspected visually for the presence of peculiar features such as the infrared Ca ii triplet or the presence of a double Balmer discontinuity. The Balmer line equivalent widths were measured, but due to uncertainties in determining the photospheric contribution are useful only in a subsample of Be stars for determining the pure emission contribution. Results. A total of 78 Be stars, mostly late type ones, were identified in the X-shooter telluric standard star archive, out of which 48 had not been reported before. The general trend of late type Be stars having more tenuous disks and being less variable than early type ones is confirmed. The relatively large number (48) of relatively bright (V > 8.5) additional Be stars casts some doubt on the statistics of late type Be stars; they are more common than currently thought: The Be/B star fraction may not strongly depend on spectral subtype.
  • We focus on empirically measure the p-factor of a homogeneous sample of 29 LMC and 10 SMC Cepheids for which an accurate average LMC/SMC distance were estimated from eclipsing binary systems. We used the SPIPS algorithm, which is an implementation of the BW method. As opposed to other conventional use, SPIPS combines all observables, i.e. radial velocities, multi-band photometry and interferometry into a consistent physical modeling to estimate the parameters of the stars. The large number and their redundancy insure its robustness and improves the statistical precision. We successfully estimated the p-factor of several MC Cepheids. Combined with our previous Galactic results, we find the following P-p relation: -0.08(log P-1.18)+1.24. We find no evidence of a metallicity dependent p-factor. We also derive a new calibration of the P-R relation, logR=0.684(log P-0.517)+1.489, with an intrinsic dispersion of 0.020. We detect an IR excess for all stars at 3.6 and 4.5um, which might be the signature of circumstellar dust. We measure a mean offset of $\Delta m_{3.6}=0.057$mag and $\Delta m_{4.5}=0.065$mag. We provide a new P-p relation based on a multi-wavelengths fit, and can be used for the distance scale calibration from the BW method. The dispersion is due to the MCs width we took into account because individual Cepheids distances are unknown. The new P-R relation has a small intrinsic dispersion, i.e. 4.5% in radius. Such precision will allow us to accurately apply the BW method to nearby galaxies. Finally, the IR excesses we detect raise again the issue on using mid-IR wavelengths to derive P-L relation and calibrate the $H_0$. These IR excesses might be the signature of circumstellar dust, and are never taken into account when applying the BW method at those wavelengths. Our measured offsets may give an average bias of 2.8% on the distances derived through mid-IR P-L relations.
  • We give an update on our long-term program of Galactic Cepheids started in 2012, whose goal is to measure the visual orbits of Cepheid companions. Using the VLTI/PIONIER and CHARA/MIRC instruments, we have now detected several com- panions, and we already have a good orbital coverage for several of them. By combining interferometry and radial velocities, we can now derive all the orbital elements of the systems, and we will be soon able to estimate the Cepheid masses.
  • The mass of a Cepheid is a fundamental parameter for studying the pulsation and evolution of intermediate-mass stars. But determining this variable has been a long-standing problem for decades. Detecting the companions (by spectroscopy or imaging) is a difficult task because of the brightness of the Cepheids and the close orbit of the components. So most of the Cepheid masses are derived using stellar evolution or pulsation modeling, but they differ by 10-20%. Measurements of dynamical masses offer the unique opportunity to make progress in resolving this mass discrepancy. The first problem in studying binary Cepheids is the high contrast between the components for wavelengths longer than 0.5 {\mu}m, which make them single-line spectroscopic binaries. In addition, the close orbit of the companions (< 40 mas) prevents us from spatially resolving the systems with a single-dish 8m-class telescope. A technique able to reach high spatial resolution and high- dynamic range is long-baseline interferometry. We have started a long-term program that aims at detecting, monitoring and characterizing physical parameters of the Cepheid companions. The GAIA parallaxes will enable us to combine interferometry with single-line velocities to provide unique dynamical mass measurements of Cepheids.
  • GRAVITY Collaboration: R. Abuter, M. Accardo, A. Amorim, N. Anugu, G. Ávila, N. Azouaoui, M. Benisty, J.P. Berger, N. Blind, H. Bonnet, P. Bourget, W. Brandner, R. Brast, A. Buron, L. Burtscher, F. Cassaing, F. Chapron, É. Choquet, Y. Clénet, C. Collin, V. Coudé du Foresto, W. de Wit, P.T. de Zeeuw, C. Deen, F. Delplancke-Ströbele, R. Dembet, F. Derie, J. Dexter, G. Duvert, M. Ebert, A. Eckart, F. Eisenhauer, M. Esselborn, P. Fédou, G. Finger, P. Garcia, C.E. Garcia Dabo, R. Garcia Lopez, E. Gendron, R. Genzel, S. Gillessen, F. Gonte, P. Gordo, M. Grould, U. Grözinger, S. Guieu, P. Haguenauer, O. Hans, X. Haubois, M. Haug, F. Haussmann, Th. Henning, S. Hippler, M. Horrobin, A. Huber, Z. Hubert, N. Hubin, C.A. Hummel, G. Jakob, A. Janssen, L. Jochum, L. Jocou, A. Kaufer, S. Kellner, L. Kern, P. Kervella, M. Kiekebusch, R. Klein, Y. Kok, J. Kolb, M. Kulas, S. Lacour, V. Lapeyrère, B. Lazareff, J.-B. Le Bouquin, P. Lèna, R. Lenzen, S. Lévêque, M. Lippa, Y. Magnard, L. Mehrgan, M. Mellein, A. Mérand, J. Moreno-Ventas, T. Moulin, E. Müller, F. Müller, U. Neumann, S. Oberti, T. Ott, L. Pallanca, J. Panduro, L. Pasquini, T. Paumard, I. Percheron, K. Perraut, G. Perrin, A. Pflüger, O. Pfuhl, T. Phan Duc, P.M. Plewa, D. Popovic, S. Rabien, A. Ramírez, J. Ramos, C. Rau, M. Riquelme, R.-R. Rohloff, G. Rousset, J. Sanchez-Bermudez, S. Scheithauer, M. Schöller, N. Schuhler, J. Spyromilio, C. Straubmeier, E. Sturm, M. Suarez, K.R.W. Tristram, N. Ventura, F. Vincent, I. Waisberg, I. Wank, J. Weber, E. Wieprecht, M. Wiest, E. Wiezorrek, M. Wittkowski, J. Woillez, B. Wolff, S. Yazici, D. Ziegler, G. Zins
    May 5, 2017 astro-ph.IM
    GRAVITY is a new instrument to coherently combine the light of the European Southern Observatory Very Large Telescope Interferometer to form a telescope with an equivalent 130 m diameter angular resolution and a collecting area of 200 m$^2$. The instrument comprises fiber fed integrated optics beam combination, high resolution spectroscopy, built-in beam analysis and control, near-infrared wavefront sensing, phase-tracking, dual beam operation and laser metrology [...]. This article gives an overview of GRAVITY and reports on the performance and the first astronomical observations during commissioning in 2015/16. We demonstrate phase tracking on stars as faint as m$_K$ ~ 10 mag, phase-referenced interferometry of objects fainter than m$_K$ ~ 15 mag with a limiting magnitude of m$_K$ ~ 17 mag, minute long coherent integrations, a visibility accuracy of better than 0.25 %, and spectro-differential phase and closure phase accuracy better than 0.5{\deg}, corresponding to a differential astrometric precision of better than 10 microarcseconds ({\mu}as). The dual-beam astrometry, measuring the phase difference of two objects with laser metrology, is still under commissioning. First observations show residuals as low as 50 {\mu}as when following objects over several months. We illustrate the instrument performance with the observations of archetypical objects for the different instrument modes. Examples include the Galactic Center supermassive black hole and its fast orbiting star S2 for phase referenced dual beam observations and infrared wavefront sensing, the High Mass X-Ray Binary BP Cru and the Active Galactic Nucleus of PDS 456 for few {\mu}as spectro-differential astrometry, the T Tauri star S CrA for a spectro-differential visibility analysis, {\xi} Tel and 24 Cap for high accuracy visibility observations, and {\eta} Car for interferometric imaging with GRAVITY.
  • We observe the HMXB BP Cru using interferometry in the near-infrared K band with VLTI/GRAVITY. Continuum visibilities are at most partially resolved, consistent with the predicted size of the hypergiant. Differential visibility amplitude ($\Delta |V| \sim 5\%$) and phase ($\Delta \phi \sim 2 \deg$) signatures are observed across the HeI $2.059 \mu$m and Br$\gamma$ lines, the latter seen strongly in emission, unusual for the donor star's spectral type. For a baseline $B \sim 100$m, the differential phase RMS $\sim 0.2 \deg$ corresponds to an astrometric precision of $\sim 2 \mu$as. A model-independent analysis in the marginally resolved limit of interferometry reveals asymmetric and extended emission with a strong wavelength dependence. We propose geometric models based on an extended and distorted wind and/or a high density gas stream, which has long been predicted to be present in this system. The observations show that optical interferometry is now able to resolve HMXBs at the spatial scale at which accretion takes place, and therefore probe the effects of the gravitational and radiation fields of the compact object on its environment.
  • We present the first optical observation at sub-milliarcsecond (mas) scale of the microquasar SS 433 obtained with the GRAVITY instrument on the VLT interferometer. The 3.5 hour exposure reveals a rich K-band spectrum dominated by hydrogen Br$\gamma\ $ and \ion{He}{i} lines, as well as (red-shifted) emission lines coming from the jets. The K-band continuum emitting region is dominated by a marginally resolved point source ($<$ 1 mas) embedded inside a diffuse background accounting for 10\% of the total flux. The jet line positions agree well with the ones expected from the jet kinematic model, an interpretation also supported by the consistent sign (i.e. negative/positive for the receding/approaching jet component) of the phase shifts observed in the lines. The significant visibility drop across the jet lines, together with the small and nearly identical phases for all baselines, point toward a jet that is offset by less than 0.5 mas from the continuum source and resolved in the direction of propagation, with a typical size of 2 mas. The jet position angle of $\sim$80$^{\circ}$ is consistent with the expected one at the observation date. Jet emission so close to the central binary system would suggest that line locking, if relevant to explain the amplitude and stability of the 0.26c jet velocity, operates on elements heavier than hydrogen. The Br$\gamma\ $ profile is broad and double peaked. It is better resolved than the continuum and the change of the phase signal sign across the line on all baselines suggests an East-West oriented geometry alike the jet direction and supporting a (polar) disk wind origin.
  • The projection factor p is the key quantity used in the Baade-Wesselink (BW) method for distance determination; it converts radial velocities into pulsation velocities. Several methods are used to determine p, such as geometrical and hydrodynamical models or the inverse BW approach when the distance is known. We analyze new HARPS-N spectra of delta Cep to measure its cycle-averaged atmospheric velocity gradient in order to better constrain the projection factor. We first apply the inverse BW method to derive p directly from observations. The projection factor can be divided into three subconcepts: (1) a geometrical effect (p0); (2) the velocity gradient within the atmosphere (fgrad); and (3) the relative motion of the optical pulsating photosphere with respect to the corresponding mass elements (fo-g). We then measure the fgrad value of delta Cep for the first time. When the HARPS-N mean cross-correlated line-profiles are fitted with a Gaussian profile, the projection factor is pcc-g = 1.239 +/- 0.034(stat) +/- 0.023(syst). When we consider the different amplitudes of the radial velocity curves that are associated with 17 selected spectral lines, we measure projection factors ranging from 1.273 to 1.329. We find a relation between fgrad and the line depth measured when the Cepheid is at minimum radius. This relation is consistent with that obtained from our best hydrodynamical model of delta Cep and with our projection factor decomposition. Using the observational values of p and fgrad found for the 17 spectral lines, we derive a semi-theoretical value of fo-g. We alternatively obtain fo-g = 0.975+/-0.002 or 1.006+/-0.002 assuming models using radiative transfer in plane-parallel or spherically symmetric geometries, respectively. The new HARPS-N observations of delta Cep are consistent with our decomposition of the projection factor.
  • The rapid proper motion of the alpha Cen pair (3.7 arcsec/yr) and its location close to the galactic plane on a rich stellar background combine to make them excellent candidates for stellar conjunctions with distant stars. Adding new astrometry to archival data, we have refined the orbital parameters, barycentric proper motion and parallax of alpha Cen and compute its apparent trajectory on sky over the coming decades. We present a catalog of the expected close conjunctions until 2050. An exceptional event will take place in early May 2028, when alpha Cen A will come within 0.015 +/- 0.135 arcseconds of the mK = 7.8 star 2MASS 14392160-6049528 (hereafter S5). In terms of impact parameter and contrast, this is the most favorable stellar conjunction of alpha Cen within at least the next three decades. With an angular diameter of LD = 0.47 +/- 0.05 mas, it is likely that S5 is a red giant or supergiant located at several kiloparsecs. The approached stars will act as moving light probes in transmission through the environment of alpha Cen. The observation of these close conjunctions holds great promises to search for planets and other low mass objects in the alpha Cen system using photometry and astrometry. The relativistic deflection of the approached star images will be in the milliarcsecond range. The small impact parameter of the conjunction with S5 means that this star has a probability of 45% of entering the Einstein ring of alpha Cen A. The gravitational amplification of the flux of S5 could reach a factor five for the combination of the two lensed images. The proper motion, orbital parameters and parallax of alpha Cen will be measurable with an extreme accuracy from differential astrometry with the S stars. This will be valuable, for example to prepare the Breakthrough Starshot initiative to send interstellar nanocrafts to alpha Centauri.
  • Context. The mass loss from massive stars is not understood well. Eta Car is a unique object for studying the massive stellar wind during the LBV phase. It is also an eccentric binary with a period of 5.54 yr. The nature of both stars is uncertain, although we know from X-ray studies that there is a wind-wind collision whose properties change with orbital phase. Methods. Observations of Eta Car were carried out with the ESO VLTI and the AMBER instrument between approximately five and seven months before the August 2014 periastron passage. Velocity-resolved aperture-synthesis images were reconstructed from the spectrally dispersed interferograms. Interferometric studies can provide information on the binary orbit, the primary wind, and the wind collision. Results. We present velocity-resolved aperture-synthesis images reconstructed in more than 100 different spectral channels distributed across the Br Gamma 2.166 micrometer emission line. The intensity distribution of the images strongly depends on wavelength. At wavelengths corresponding to radial velocities of approximately -140 to -376 km/s measured relative to line center, the intensity distribution has a fan-shaped structure. At the velocity of -277 km/s, the position angle of the symmetry axis of the fan is ~ 126 degree. The fan-shaped structure extends approximately 8.0 mas (~ 18.8 au) to the southeast and 5.8 mas (~ 13.6 au) to the northwest, measured along the symmetry axis at the 16% intensity contour. The shape of the intensity distributions suggests that the obtained images are the first direct images of the innermost wind-wind collision zone. Therefore, the observations provide velocity-dependent image structures that can be used to test three-dimensional hydrodynamical, radiative transfer models of the massive interacting winds of Eta Car.
  • The B-W method is used to determine the distance of Cepheids and consists in combining the angular size variations of the star, as derived from infrared surface-brightness relations or interferometry, with its linear size variation, as deduced from visible spectroscopy using the projection factor. While many Cepheids have been intensively observed by infrared beam combiners, only a few have been observed in the visible. This paper is part of a project to observe Cepheids in the visible with interferometry as a counterpart to infrared observations already in hand. Observations of delta Cep itself were secured with the VEGA/CHARA instrument over the full pulsation cycle of the star. These visible interferometric data are consistent in first approximation with a quasi-hydrostatic model of pulsation surrounded by a static circumstellar environment (CSE) with a size of theta_cse=8.9 +/- 3.0 mas and a relative flux contribution of f_cse=0.07+/-0.01. A model of visible nebula (a background source filling the field of view of the interferometer) with the same relative flux contribution is also consistent with our data at small spatial frequencies. However, in both cases, we find discrepancies in the squared visibilities at high spatial frequencies (maximum 2sigma) with two different regimes over the pulsation cycle of the star, phi=0.0-0.8 and phi=0.8-1.0. We provide several hypotheses to explain these discrepancies, but more observations and theoretical investigations are necessary before a firm conclusion can be drawn. For the first time we have been able to detect in the visible domain a resolved structure around delta~Cep. We have also shown that a simple model cannot explain the observations, and more work will be necessary in the future, both on observations and modelling.
  • MATISSE is the second-generation mid-infrared spectrograph and imager for the Very Large Telescope Interferometer (VLTI) at Paranal. This new interferometric instrument will allow significant advances by opening new avenues in various fundamental research fields: studying the planet-forming region of disks around young stellar objects, understanding the surface structures and mass loss phenomena affecting evolved stars, and probing the environments of black holes in active galactic nuclei. As a first breakthrough, MATISSE will enlarge the spectral domain of current optical interferometers by offering the L and M bands in addition to the N band. This will open a wide wavelength domain, ranging from 2.8 to 13 um, exploring angular scales as small as 3 mas (L band) / 10 mas (N band). As a second breakthrough, MATISSE will allow mid-infrared imaging - closure-phase aperture-synthesis imaging - with up to four Unit Telescopes (UT) or Auxiliary Telescopes (AT) of the VLTI. Moreover, MATISSE will offer a spectral resolution range from R ~ 30 to R ~ 5000. Here, we present one of the main science objectives, the study of protoplanetary disks, that has driven the instrument design and motivated several VLTI upgrades (GRA4MAT and NAOMI). We introduce the physical concept of MATISSE including a description of the signal on the detectors and an evaluation of the expected performances. We also discuss the current status of the MATISSE instrument, which is entering its testing phase, and the foreseen schedule for the next two years that will lead to the first light at Paranal.
  • The nearby red dwarf binary GJ65AB (UB+BL Ceti, M5.5Ve+M6Ve) is a cornerstone system to probe the physics of very low mass stars. We present new interferometric measurements of the angular diameters of the two components of GJ65AB with the PIONIER instrument in the H band: thetaUD (A) = 0.558 +/- 0.008 +/- 0.020 mas and thetaUD (B) = 0.539 +/- 0.009 +/- 0.020 mas. They translate into limb-darkened angular diameters of LD (A) = 0.573 +/- 0.021 mas and LD (B) = 0.554 +/- 0.022 mas. From the known parallax, the radii are R(A) = 0.165 +/- 0.006 Rsun and R(B) = 0.159 +/- 0.006 Rsun (sigma(R)/R = 4%). We also observed GJ65AB with the VLT/NACO adaptive optics and refine the orbital parameters and infrared magnitudes of the system. We derive masses for the two components of m(A) = 0.1225 +/- 0.0043 Msun and m(B) = 0.1195 +/- 0.0043 Msun (sigma(m)/m = 4%). To derive the radial and rotational velocities of the two stars, as well as their relative metallicity with respect to Proxima, we also present new individual UVES high resolution spectra. Placing GJ65 A&B in the mass-radius diagram shows that their radii are larger respectively by 14 +/- 4% and 12 +/- 4% compared to expectations from the models by Baraffe et al. (2015). Following Chabrier et al. (2007), we propose that this discrepancy is caused by the inhibition of convective energy transport by a strong internal magnetic field generated by dynamo effect in these two fast rotating stars. A comparison with the almost identical twin but slowly-rotating Proxima strengthens this hypothesis, as the radius of Proxima does not appear inflated compared to models.
  • We report new CHARA/MIRC interferometric observations of the Cepheid archetype $\delta$ Cep, which aimed at detecting the newly discovered spectroscopic companion. We reached a maximum dynamic range $\Delta H $ = 6.4, 5.8, and 5.2 mag, respectively within the relative distance to the Cepheid $r < 25$ mas, $25 < r < 50$ mas and $50 < r < 100$ mas. Our observations did not show strong evidence of a companion. We have a marginal detection at $3\sigma$ with a flux ratio of 0.21\%, but nothing convincing as we found other possible probable locations. We ruled out the presence of companion with a spectral type earlier than F0V, A1V and B9V, respectively for the previously cited ranges $r$. From our estimated sensitivity limits and the Cepheid light curve, we derived lower-limit magnitudes in the $H$ band for this possible companion to be $H_\mathrm{comp} > 9.15, 8.31$ and 7.77 mag, respectively for $r < 25$ mas, $25 < r < 50$ mas and $50 < r < 100$ mas. We also found that to be consistent with the predicted orbital period, the companion has to be located at a projected separation $< 24$ mas with a spectral type later than a F0V star.
  • Context: Independent distance estimates are particularly useful to check the precision of other distance indicators, while accurate and precise masses are necessary to constrain evolution models. Aim: The goal is to measure the masses and distance of the detached eclipsing-binary TZ~For with a precision level lower than 1\,\% using a fully geometrical and empirical method. Method: We obtained the first interferometric observations of TZ~For with the VLTI/PIONIER combiner, which we combined with new and precise radial velocity measurements to derive its three-dimensional orbit, masses, and distance. Results: The system is well resolved by PIONIER at each observing epoch, which allowed a combined fit with eleven astrometric positions. Our derived values are in a good agreement with previous work, but with an improved precision. We measured the mass of both components to be $M_1 = 2.057 \pm 0.001\,M_\odot$ and $M_2 = 1.958 \pm 0.001\,M_\odot$. The comparison with stellar evolution models gives an age of the system of $1.20 \pm 0.10$\,Gyr. We also derived the distance to the system with a precision level of 1.1\,\%: $d = 185.9 \pm 1.9$\,pc. Such precise and accurate geometrical distances to eclipsing binaries provide a unique opportunity to test the absolute calibration of the surface brightness-colour relation for late-type stars, and will also provide the best opportunity to check on the future Gaia measurements for possible systematic errors.
  • Baade-Wesselink-type (BW) techniques enable geometric distance measurements of Cepheid variable stars in the Galaxy and the Magellanic clouds. The leading uncertainties involved concern projection factors required to translate observed radial velocities (RVs) to pulsational velocities and recently discovered modulated variability. We carried out an unprecedented observational campaign involving long-baseline interferometry (VLTI/PIONIER) and spectroscopy (Euler/Coralie) to search for modulated variability in the long-period (P $\sim$ 35.5 d) Cepheid Carinae. We determine highly precise angular diameters from squared visibilities and investigate possible differences between two consecutive maximal diameters, $\Delta_{\rm{max}} \Theta$. We characterize the modulated variability along the line-of-sight using 360 high-precision RVs. Here we report tentative evidence for modulated angular variability and confirm cycle-to-cycle differences of $\ell$ Carinae's RV variability. Two successive maxima yield $\Delta_{\rm{max}} \Theta$ = 13.1 $\pm$ 0.7 (stat.) {\mu}as for uniform disk models and 22.5 $\pm$ 1.4 (stat.) {\mu}as (4% of the total angular variation) for limb-darkened models. By comparing new RVs with 2014 RVs we show modulation to vary in strength. Barring confirmation, our results suggest the optical continuum (traced by interferometry) to be differently affected by modulation than gas motions (traced by spectroscopy). This implies a previously unknown time-dependence of projection factors, which can vary by 5% between consecutive cycles of expansion and contraction. Additional interferometric data are required to confirm modulated angular diameter variations. By understanding the origin of modulated variability and monitoring its long-term behavior, we aim to improve the accuracy of BW distances and further the understanding of stellar pulsations.
  • The mass-loss process in Mira stars probably occurs in an asymmetric way where dust can form in inhomogeneous circumstellar molecular clumps. Following asymmetries along the pulsation cycle can give us clues about these mass-loss processes. We imaged the Mira star X Hya and its environnement at different epochs to follow the evolution of the morphology in the continuum and in the molecular bands. We observed X Hya with AMBER in J-H-K at low resolution at two epochs. We modelled squared visibilities with geometrical and physical models. We also present imaging reconstruction results obtained with MiRA and based on the physical a priori images. We report on the angular scale change of X Hya between the two epochs. 1D CODEX profiles allowed us to understand and model the spectral variation of squared visibilities and constrain the stellar parameters. Reconstructed model-dependent images enabled us to reproduce closure phase signals and the azimuthal dependence of squared visibilities. They show evidence for material inhomogeneities located in the immediate environment of the star.
  • Long-baseline interferometry is an important technique to spatially resolve binary or multiple systems in close orbits. By combining several telescopes together and spectrally dispersing the light, it is possible to detect faint components around bright stars. Aims. We provide a rigorous and detailed method to search for high-contrast companions around stars, determine the detection level, and estimate the dynamic range from interferometric observations. We developed the code CANDID (Companion Analysis and Non-Detection in Interferometric Data), a set of Python tools that allows us to search systematically for point-source, high-contrast companions and estimate the detection limit. The search pro- cedure is made on a N x N grid of fit, whose minimum needed resolution is estimated a posteriori. It includes a tool to estimate the detection level of the companion in the number of sigmas. The code CANDID also incorporates a robust method to set a 3{\sigma} detection limit on the flux ratio, which is based on an analytical injection of a fake companion at each point in the grid. We used CANDID to search for the companions around the binary Cepheids V1334 Cyg, AX Cir, RT Aur, AW Per, SU Cas, and T Vul. First, we showed that our previous discoveries of the components orbiting V1334 Cyg and AX Cir were detected at > 13 sigmas. The companion around AW Per is detected at more than 15 sigmas with a flux ratio of f = 1.22 +/- 0.30 %. We made a possible detection of the companion orbiting RT Aur with f = 0.22 +/- 0.11 %. It was detected at 3.8{\sigma} using the closure phases only, and so more observations are needed to confirm the detection. We also set the detection limit for possible undetected companions. We found that there is no companion with a spectral type earlier than B7V, A5V, F0V, B9V, A0V, and B9V orbiting V1334 Cyg, AX Cir, RT Aur, AW Per, SU Cas, and T Vul, respectively.
  • As one of the most luminous Cepheids in the Milky Way, the 41.5-day RS Puppis is an analog of the long-period Cepheids used to measure extragalactic distances. An accurate distance to this star would therefore help anchor the zero-point of the bright end of the period-luminosity relation. But, at a distance of about 2 kpc, RS Pup is too far away for measuring a direct trigonometric parallax with a precision of a few percent with existing instrumentation. RS Pup is unique in being surrounded by a reflection nebula, whose brightness varies as pulses of light from the Cepheid propagate outwards. We present new polarimetric imaging of the nebula obtained with HST/ACS. The derived map of the degree of linear polarization pL allows us to reconstruct the three-dimensional structure of the dust distribution. To retrieve the scattering angle from the pL value, we consider two different polarization models, one based on a Milky Way dust mixture and one assuming Rayleigh scattering. Considering the derived dust distribution in the nebula, we adjust a model of the phase lag of the photometric variations over selected nebular features to retrieve the distance of RS Pup. We obtain a distance of 1910 +/- 80 pc (4.2%), corresponding to a parallax of 0.524 +/- 0.022 mas. The agreement between the two polarization models we considered is good, but the final uncertainty is dominated by systematics in the adopted model parameters. The distance we obtain is consistent with existing measurements from the literature, but light echoes provide a distance estimate that is not subject to the same systematic uncertainties as other estimators (e.g. the Baade-Wesselink technique). RS Pup therefore provides an important fiducial for the calibration of systematic uncertainties of the long-period Cepheid distance scale.
  • Classical Cepheid stars have been considered since more than a century as reliable tools to estimate distances in the universe thanks to their Period-Luminosity (P-L) relationship. Moreover, they are also powerful astrophysical laboratories, providing fundamental clues for studying the pulsation and evolution of intermediate-mass stars. When in binary systems, we can investigate the age and evolution of the Cepheid, estimate the mass and distance, and constrain theoretical models. However, most of the companions are located too close to the Cepheid (1-40 mas) to be spatially resolved with a 10-meter class telescope. The only way to spatially resolve such systems is to use long-baseline interferometry. Recently, we have started a unique and long-term interferometric program that aims at detecting and characterizing physical parameters of the Cepheid companions, with as main objectives the determination of accurate masses and geometric distances.
  • Optical interferometry is the only technique giving access to milli-arcsecond (mas) resolution at infrared wavelengths. For Cepheids, this is a powerful and unique tool to detect the orbiting companions and the circumstellar envelopes (CSE). CSEs are interesting because they might be used to trace the Cepheid evolution history, and more particularly they could impact the distance scale. Cepheids belonging to binary systems offer an unique opportunity to make progress in resolving the Cepheid mass discrepancy. The combination of spectroscopic and interferometric measurements will allow us to derive the orbital elements, distances, and dynamical masses. Here we focus on recent results using 2- to 6-telescopes beam combiners for the Cepheids X Sgr, T Mon and V1334 Cyg.
  • We aim at determining the masses of Cepheids in binary systems, as well as their geometric distances and the flux contribution of the companions. The combination of interferometry with spectroscopy will offer a unique and independent estimate of the Cepheid masses. Using long-baseline interferometry at visible and infrared wavelengths, it is possible to spatially resolve binary systems containing a Cepheid down to milliarcsecond separations. Based on the resulting visual orbit and radial velocities, we can then derive the fundamental parameters of these systems, particularly the masses of the components and the geometric distance. We therefore performed interferometric observations of the first-overtone mode Cepheid V1334 Cyg with the CHARA/MIRC combiner. We report the first detection of a Cepheid companion using long-baseline interferometry. We detect the signature of a companion orbiting V1334 Cyg at two epochs. We measure a flux ratio between the companion and the Cepheid f = 3.10+/-0.08%, giving an apparent magnitude mH = 8.47+/-0.15mag. The combination of interferometric and spectroscopic data have enabled the unique determination of the orbital elements: P = 1938.6+/-1.2 days, Tp = 2 443 616.1+/-7.3, a = 8.54+/-0.51mas, i = 124.7+/-1.8{\deg}, e = 0.190+/-0.013, {\omega} = 228.7+/-1.6{\deg}, and {\Omega} = 206.3+/-9.4{\deg}. We derive a minimal distance d ~ 691 pc, a minimum mass for both stars of 3.6 Msol, with a spectral type earlier than B5.5V for the companion star. Our measured flux ratio suggests that radial velocity detection of the companion using spectroscopy is within reach, and would provide an orbital parallax and model-free masses.
  • In the summer of 2011, the first on-sky astrometric commissioning of PRIMA-Astrometry delivered a performance of 3 m'' for a 10 '' separation on bright objects, orders of magnitude away from its exoplanet requirement of 50 {\mu}'' ~ 20 {\mu}'' on objects as faint as 11 mag ~ 13 mag in K band. This contribution focuses on upgrades and characterizations carried out since then. The astrometric metrology was extended from the Coud\'e focus of the Auxillary Telescopes to their secondary mirror, in order to reduce the baseline instabilities and improve the astrometric performance. While carrying out this extension, it was realized that the polarization retardance of the star separator derotator had a major impact on both the astrometric metrology and the fringe sensors. A local compensation of this retardance and the operation on a symmetric baseline allowed a new astrometric commissioning. In October 2013, an improved astrometric performance of 160 {\mu}'' was demonstrated, still short of the requirements. Instabilities in the astrometric baseline still appear to be the dominating factor. In preparation to a review held in January 2014, a plan was developed to further improve the astrometric and faint target performance of PRIMA Astrometry. On the astrometric aspect, it involved the extension of the internal longitudinal metrology to primary space, the design and implementation of an external baseline metrology, and the development of an astrometric internal fringes mode. On the faint target aspect, investigations of the performance of the fringe sensor units and the development of an AO system (NAOMI) were in the plan. Following this review, ESO decided to take a proposal to the April 2014 STC that PRIMA be cancelled, and that ESO resources be concentrated on ensuring that Gravity and Matisse are a success. This proposal was recommended by the STC in May 2014, and endorsed by ESO.