• Superconducting hybrid junctions are revealing a variety of novel effects. Some of them are due to the special layout of these devices, which often use a coplanar configuration with relatively large barrier channels and the possibility of hosting Pearl vortices. A Josephson junction with a quasi ideal two-dimensional barrier has been realized by growing graphene on SiC with Al electrodes. Chemical Vapor Deposition offers centimeter size monolayer areas where it is possible to realize a comparative analysis of different devices with nominally the same barrier. In samples with a graphene gap below 400 nm, we have found evidence of Josephson coherence in presence of an incipient Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless transition. When the magnetic field is cycled, a remarkable hysteretic collapse and revival of the Josephson supercurrent occurs. Similar hysteresis are found in granular systems and are usually justified within the Bean Critical State model (CSM). We show that the CSM, with appropriate account for the low dimensional geometry, can partly explain the odd features measured in these junctions.
  • Graphene on silicon carbide (SiC) has proved to be highly successful in Hall conductance quantization for its homogeneity at the centimetre scale. Robust Josephson coupling has been measured in co-planar diffusive Al/monololayer graphene/Al junctions. Graphene on SiC substrates is a concrete candidate to provide scalability of hybrid Josephson graphene/superconductor devices, giving also promise of ballistic propagation.
  • The quantum Hall effect (QHE) theoretically provides a universal standard of electrical resistance in terms of the Planck constant $h$ and the electron charge $e$. In graphene, the spacing between the lowest discrete energy levels occupied by the charge carriers under magnetic field is exceptionally large. This is promising for a quantum Hall resistance standard more practical in graphene than in the GaAs/AlGaAs devices currently used in national metrology institutes. Here, we demonstrate that large QHE devices, made of high quality graphene grown by propane/hydrogen chemical vapour deposition on SiC substrates, can surpass state-of-the-art GaAs/AlGaAs devices by considerable margins in their required operational conditions. In particular, in the device presented here, the Hall resistance is accurately quantized within $1\times 10^{-9}$ over a 10-T wide range of magnetic field with a remarkable lower bound at 3.5 T, temperatures as high as 10 K, or measurement currents as high as 0.5 mA. These significantly enlarged and relaxed operational conditions, with a very convenient compromise of 5 T, 5.1 K and 50 $\mu$A, set the superiority of graphene for this application and for the new generation of versatile and user-friendly quantum standards, compatible with a broader industrial use. We also measured an agreement of the quantized Hall resistance in graphene and GaAs/AlGaAs with an ultimate relative uncertainty of $8.2\times 10^{-11}$. This supports the universality of the QHE and its theoretical relation to $h$ and $e$, essential for the application in metrology, particularly in view of the forthcoming Syst\`eme International d'unit\'es (SI) based on fundamental constants of physics, including the redefinition of the kilogram in terms of $h$.
  • Replacing GaAs by graphene to realize more practical quantum Hall resistance standards (QHRS), accurate to within $10^{-9}$ in relative value, but operating at lower magnetic fields than 10 T, is an ongoing goal in metrology. To date, the required accuracy has been reported, only few times, in graphene grown on SiC by sublimation of Si, under higher magnetic fields. Here, we report on a device made of graphene grown by chemical vapour deposition on SiC which demonstrates such accuracies of the Hall resistance from 10 T up to 19 T at 1.4 K. This is explained by a quantum Hall effect with low dissipation, resulting from strongly localized bulk states at the magnetic length scale, over a wide magnetic field range. Our results show that graphene-based QHRS can replace their GaAs counterparts by operating in as-convenient cryomagnetic conditions, but over an extended magnetic field range. They rely on a promising hybrid and scalable growth method and a fabrication process achieving low-electron density devices.
  • We present the magnetoresistance (MR) of highly doped monolayer graphene layers grown by chemical vapor deposition on 6H-SiC. The magnetotransport studies are performed on a large temperature range, from $T$ = 1.7 K up to room temperature. The MR exhibits a maximum in the temperature range $120-240$ K. The maximum is observed at intermediate magnetic fields ($B=2-6$ T), in between the weak localization and the Shubnikov-de Haas regimes. It results from the competition of two mechanisms. First, the low field magnetoresistance increases continuously with $T$ and has a purely classical origin. This positive MR is induced by thermal averaging and finds its physical origin in the energy dependence of the mobility around the Fermi energy. Second, the high field negative MR originates from the electron-electron interaction (EEI). The transition from the diffusive to the ballistic regime is observed. The amplitude of the EEI correction points towards the coexistence of both long and short range disorder in these samples.