• One aim of upcoming high-intensity laser facilities is to provide new high-flux gamma-ray sources. Electromagnetic cascades may serve for this, but are known to limit both field strengths and particle energies, restricting efficient production of photons to sub-GeV energies. Here we show how to create a directed GeV photon source, enabled by a controlled interplay between the cascade and anomalous radiative trapping. Using advanced 3D QED particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations and analytic estimates, we show that the concept is feasible for planned peak powers of 10 PW level. A higher peak power of 40 PW can provide $10^9$ photons with GeV energies in a well-collimated 3 fs beam, achieving peak brilliance ${9 \times 10^{24}}$ ph s$^{-1}$mrad$^{-2}$mm$^{-2}$/0.1${\%}$BW. Such a source would be a powerful tool for studying fundamental electromagnetic and nuclear processes.
  • We report on the new optical gating technique used for the direct photoconductive detection of short pulses of terahertz radiation with the resolution up to 250 femtoseconds. The femtosecond optical laser pulse time delayed with respect to the THz pulse generated a large concentration of the electron hole pairs in the AlGaAs/InGaAs High Electron Mobility Transistor (HEMT) drastically increasing the conductivity on the femtosecond scale and effectively shorting the source and drain. This optical gating quenched the response of the plasma waves launched by the THz pulse and allowed us to reproduce the waveform of the THz pulse by varying the time delay between the THz and quenching optical pulses. The results are in excellent agreement with the electro-optic effect measurements and with our hydrodynamic model that predicts the ultra-fast transistor plasmonic response at the time scale much shorter than the electron transit time, in full agreement with the measured data.
  • We review common extensions of particle-in-cell (PIC) schemes which account for strong field phenomena in laser-plasma interactions. After describing the physical processes of interest and their numerical implementation, we provide solutions for several associated methodological and algorithmic problems. We propose a modified event generator that precisely models the entire spectrum of incoherent particle emission without any low-energy cutoff, and which imposes close to the weakest possible demands on the numerical time step. Based on this, we also develop an adaptive event generator that subdivides the time step for locally resolving QED events, allowing for efficient simulation of cascades. Further, we present a new and unified technical interface for including the processes of interest in different PIC implementations. Two PIC codes which support this interface, PICADOR and ELMIS, are also briefly reviewed.