• We have analysed the [OI]6300 A line in a sample of 131 young stars with discs in the Lupus, Chamaeleon and signa Orionis star forming regions, observed with the X-shooter spectrograph at VLT. The stars have mass accretion rates spanning from 10^{-12} to 10^{-7} Mo/yr. The line profile was deconvolved into a low velocity component (LVC, < 40 km/s) and a high velocity component (HVC, > 40 km/s ), originating from slow winds and high velocity jets, respectively. The LVC is by far the most frequent component, with a detection rate of 77%, while only 30% of sources have a HVC. The [OI]6300 luminosity of both the LVC and HVC, when detected, correlates with stellar and accretion parameters of the central sources (i.e. Lstar , Mstar , Lacc , Macc), with similar slopes for the two components. The line luminosity correlates better with the accretion luminosity than with the stellar luminosity or stellar mass. We suggest that accretion is the main drivers for the line excitation and that MHD disc-winds are at the origin of both components. In the sub-sample of Lupus sources observed with ALMA a relationship is found between the HVC peak velocity and the outer disc inclination angle, as expected if the HVC traces jets ejected perpendicularly to the disc plane. Mass loss rates measured from the HVC span from ~ 10^{-13} to ~10^{-7} Mo/yr. The corresponding Mloss/Macc ratio ranges from ~0.01 to ~0.5, with an average value of 0.07. However, considering the upper limits on the HVC, we infer a ratio < 0.03 in more than 40% of sources. We argue that most of these sources might lack the physical conditions needed for an efficient magneto-centrifugal acceleration in the star-disc interaction region. Systematic observations of populations of younger stars, that is, class 0/I, are needed to explore how the frequency and role of jets evolve during the pre-main sequence phase.
  • Disks around brown dwarfs (BDs) are excellent laboratories to study the first steps of planet formation in cold and low-mass disk conditions. The radial-drift velocities of dust particles in BD disks are higher than in disks around more massive stars. Therefore, BD disks are expected to be more depleted in millimeter-sized grains compared to disks around T Tauri or Herbig Ae/Be stars. However, recent millimeter observations of BD disks revealed low millimeter spectral indices, indicating the presence of large grains in these disks and challenging models of dust evolution. We present 3\,mm photometric observations carried out with the IRAM/Plateau de Bure Interferometer (PdBI) of three BD disks in the Taurus star forming region, which have been observed with ALMA at 0.89\,mm. The disks were not resolved and only one was detected with enough confidence ($\sim3.5\sigma$) with PdBI. Based on these observations, we obtain the values and lower limits of the spectral index and find low values ($\alpha_{\rm{mm}}\lesssim 3.0$). We compare these observations in the context of particle trapping by an embedded planet, a promising mechanism to explain the observational signatures in more massive and warmer disks. We find, however, that this model cannot reproduce the current millimeter observations for BD disks, and multiple-strong pressure bumps globally distributed in the disk remain as a favorable scenario to explain observations. Alternative possibilities are that the gas masses in BD disk are very low ($\sim2\times10^{-3}\,M_{\rm{Jup}}$) such that the millimeter grains are decoupled and do not drift, or fast growth of fluffy aggregates.
  • The formation of planets strongly depends on the total amount as well as on the spatial distribution of solids in protoplanetary disks. Thanks to the improvements in resolution and sensitivity provided by ALMA, measurements of the surface density of mm-sized grains are now possible on large samples of disks. Such measurements provide statistical constraints that can be used to inform our understanding of the initial conditions of planet formation. We analyze spatially resolved observations of 36 protoplanetary disks in the Lupus star forming complex from our ALMA survey at 890 micron, aiming to determine physical properties such as the dust surface density, the disk mass and size and to provide a constraint on the temperature profile. We fit the observations directly in the uv-plane using a two-layer disk model that computes the 890 micron emission by solving the energy balance at each disk radius. For 22 out of 36 protoplanetary disks we derive robust estimates of their physical properties. The sample covers stellar masses between ~0.1 and ~2 Solar masses, and we find no trend between the average disk temperatures and the stellar parameters. We find, instead, a correlation between the integrated sub-mm flux (a proxy for the disk mass) and the exponential cut-off radii (a proxy of the disk size) of the Lupus disks. Comparing these results with observations at similar angular resolution of Taurus-Auriga/Ophiuchus disks found in literature and scaling them to the same distance, we observe that the Lupus disks are generally fainter and larger at a high level of statistical significance. Considering the 1-2 Myr age difference between these regions, it is possible to tentatively explain the offset in the disk mass/disk size relation with viscous spreading, however with the current measurements other mechanisms cannot be ruled out.
  • Studies of the formation and evolution of young stars and their disks rely on the knowledge of the stellar parameters of the young stars. The derivation of these parameters is commonly based on comparison with photospheric template spectra. Furthermore, chromospheric emission in young active stars impacts the measurement of mass accretion rates, a key quantity to study disk evolution. Here we derive stellar properties of low-mass pre-main sequence stars without disks, which represent ideal photospheric templates for studies of young stars. We also use these spectra to constrain the impact of chromospheric emission on the measurements of mass accretion rates. The spectra in reduced, flux-calibrated, and corrected for telluric absorption form are made available to the community. We derive the spectral type for our targets by analyzing the photospheric molecular features present in their VLT/X-Shooter spectra by means of spectral indices and comparison of the relative strength of photospheric absorption features. We also measure effective temperature, gravity, projected rotational velocity, and radial velocity from our spectra by fitting them with synthetic spectra with the ROTFIT tool. The targets have negligible extinction and spectral type from G5 to M8. We perform synthetic photometry on the spectra to derive the typical colors of young stars in different filters. We measure the luminosity of the emission lines present in the spectra and estimate the noise due to chromospheric emission in the measurements of accretion luminosity in accreting stars. We provide a calibration of the photospheric colors of young PMS stars as a function of their spectral type in a set of standard broad-band optical and near-infrared filters. For stars with masses of ~ 1.5Msun and ages of ~1-5 Myr, the chromospheric noise converts to a limit of measurable mass accretion rates of ~ 3x10^-10 Msun/yr.
  • The dependence of the mass accretion rate on the stellar properties is a key constraint for star formation and disk evolution studies. Here we present a study of a sample of stars in the Chamaeleon I star forming region carried out using the VLT/X-Shooter spectrograph. The sample is nearly complete down to M~0.1Msun for the young stars still harboring a disk in this region. We derive the stellar and accretion parameters using a self-consistent method to fit the broad-band flux-calibrated medium resolution spectrum. The correlation between the accretion luminosity to the stellar luminosity, and of the mass accretion rate to the stellar mass in the logarithmic plane yields slopes of 1.9 and 2.3, respectively. These slopes and the accretion rates are consistent with previous results in various star forming regions and with different theoretical frameworks. However, we find that a broken power-law fit, with a steeper slope for stellar luminosity smaller than ~0.45 Lsun and for stellar masses smaller than ~ 0.3 Msun, is slightly preferred according to different statistical tests, but the single power-law model is not excluded. The steeper relation for lower mass stars can be interpreted as a faster evolution in the past for accretion in disks around these objects, or as different accretion regimes in different stellar mass ranges. Finally, we find two regions on the mass accretion versus stellar mass plane empty of objects. One at high mass accretion rates and low stellar masses, which is related to the steeper dependence of the two parameters we derived. The second one is just above the observational limits imposed by chromospheric emission. This empty region is located at M~0.3-0.4Msun, typical masses where photoevaporation is known to be effective, and at mass accretion rates ~10^-10 Msun/yr, a value compatible with the one expected for photoevaporation to rapidly dissipate the inner disk.
  • We present new Atacama Large Millimeter/sub-millimeter Array (ALMA) 1.3 mm continuum observations of the SR 24S transition disk with an angular resolution $\lesssim0.18"$ (12 au radius). We perform a multi-wavelength investigation by combining new data with previous ALMA data at 0.45 mm. The visibilities and images of the continuum emission at the two wavelengths are well characterized by a ring-like emission. Visibility modeling finds that the ring-like emission is narrower at longer wavelengths, in good agreement with models of dust trapping in pressure bumps, although there are complex residuals that suggest potentially asymmetric structures. The 0.45 mm emission has a shallower profile inside the central cavity than the 1.3 mm emission. In addition, we find that the $^{13}$CO and C$^{18}$O (J=2-1) emission peaks at the center of the continuum cavity. We do not detect either continuum or gas emission from the northern companion to this system (SR 24N), which is itself a binary system. The upper limit for the dust disk mass of SR 24N is $\lesssim 0.12\,M_{\bigoplus}$, which gives a disk mass ratio in dust between the two components of $M_{\mathrm{dust, SR\,24S}}/M_{\mathrm{dust, SR\,24N}}\gtrsim840$. The current ALMA observations may imply that either planets have already formed in the SR 24N disk or that dust growth to mm-sizes is inhibited there and that only warm gas, as seen by ro-vibrational CO emission inside the truncation radii of the binary, is present.
  • We present the results of a study of the stellar and accretion properties of the (almost) complete sample of class II and transitional YSOs in the Lupus I, II, III and IV clouds, based on spectroscopic data acquired with the VLT/X-Shooter spectrograph. Our study combines the dataset from our previous work with new observations of 55 additional objects. We have investigated 92 YSO candidates in total, 11 of which have been definitely identified with giant stars unrelated to Lupus. The stellar and accretion properties of the 81 bona fide YSOs, which represent more than 90% of the whole class~II and transition disc YSO population in the aforementioned Lupus clouds, have been homogeneously and self-consistently derived, allowing for an unbiased study of accretion and its relationship with stellar parameters. The accretion luminosity, Lacc, increases with the stellar luminosity, Lstar, with an overall slope of ~1.6, similar but with a smaller scatter than in previous studies. There is a significant lack of strong accretors below Lstar~0.1Lsun, where Lacc is always lower than 0.01Lstar. We argue that the Lacc-Lstar slope is not due to observational biases, but is a true property of the Lupus YSOs. The logMacc-logMstar correlation shows a statistically significant evidence of a break, with a steeper relation for Mstar<0.2Msun and a flatter slope for higher masses. The bimodality of the Macc-Mstar relation is confirmed with four different evolutionary models used to derive the stellar mass. The bimodal behaviour of the observed relationship supports the importance of modelling self-gravity in the early evolution of the more massive discs, but other processes, such as photo evaporation and planet formation during the YSO's lifetime, may also lead to disc dispersal on different timescales depending on the stellar mass. We also refined the empirical Lacc vs. Lline relationships.
  • Hydrogen recombination emission lines commonly observed in accreting young stellar objects represent a powerful tracer for the gas conditions in the circumstellar structures. Here we perform a study of the HI decrements and line profiles, from the Balmer and Paschen lines detected in the X-Shooter spectra of a homogeneous sample of 36 T Tauri stars in Lupus, the accretion and stellar properties of which were already derived in a previous work. We aim to obtain information on the gas physical conditions to derive a consistent picture of the HI emission mechanisms in pre-main sequence low-mass stars. We have empirically classified the sources based on their HI line profiles and decrements. We identified four Balmer decrement types (classified as 1, 2, 3, and 4) and three Paschen decrement types (A, B, and C), characterised by different shapes. We first discussed the connection between the decrement types and the source properties and then compared the observed decrements with predictions from recently published local line excitation models. One third of the objects show lines with narrow symmetric profiles, and present similar Balmer and Paschen decrements (straight decrements, types 2 and A). Lines in these sources are consistent with optically thin emission from gas with hydrogen densities of order 10^9 cm^-3 and 5000<T<15000 K. These objects are associated with low mass accretion rates. Type 4 (L-shaped) Balmer and type B Paschen decrements are found in conjunction with very wide line profiles and are characteristic of strong accretors, with optically thick emission from high-density gas (log n_H > 11 cm^-3). Type 1 (curved) Balmer decrements are observed only in three sub-luminous sources viewed edge-on, so we speculate that these are actually reddened type 2 decrements. About 20% of the objects present type 3 Balmer decrements (bumpy), which cannot be reproduced with current models.
  • The study of the properties of disks around young brown dwarfs can provide important clues on the formation of these very low-mass objects and on the possibility of forming planetary systems around them. The presence of warm dusty disks around brown dwarfs is well known, based on near- and mid-infrared studies. High angular resolution observations of the cold outer disk are limited; we used ALMA to attempt a first survey of young brown dwarfs in the $\rho$-Oph star-forming region. All 17 young brown dwarfs in our sample were observed at 890 $\mu $m in the continuum at $\sim0.\!^{\prime\prime}5$ angular resolution. The sensitivity of our observations was chosen to detect $\sim0.5$ M$_\oplus$ of dust. We detect continuum emission in 11 disks ($\sim65$\%\ of the total), and the estimated mass of dust in the detected disks ranges from $\sim0.5$ to $\sim6$ M$_\oplus$. These disk masses imply that planet formation around brown dwarfs may be relatively rare and that the supra-Jupiter mass companions found around some brown dwarfs are probably the result of a binary system formation. We find evidence that the two brightest disks in $\rho$-Oph have sharp outer edges at R<~25 AU, in contrast to disks around Taurus brown dwarfs. This difference may suggest that the different environment in $\rho$-Oph may lead to significant differences in disk properties. A comparison of the M$_{disk}$/M$_\ast$ ratio for brown dwarf and solar-mass systems also shows a possible deficit of mass in brown dwarfs, which could support the evidence for dynamical truncation of disks in the substellar regime. These findings are still tentative and need to be put on firmer grounds by studying the gaseous disks around brown dwarfs and by performing a more systematic and unbiased survey of the disk population around the more massive stars.
  • A relation between the mass accretion rate onto the central young star and the mass of the surrounding protoplanetary disk has long been theoretically predicted and observationally sought. For the first time, we have accurately and homogeneously determined the photospheric parameters, mass accretion rate, and disk mass for an essentially complete sample of young stars with disks in the Lupus clouds. Our work combines the results of surveys conducted with VLT/X-Shooter and ALMA. With this dataset we are able to test a basic prediction of viscous accretion theory, the existence of a linear relation between the mass accretion rate onto the central star and the total disk mass. We find a correlation between the mass accretion rate and the disk dust mass, with a ratio that is roughly consistent with the expected viscous timescale when assuming an interstellar medium (ISM) gas-to-dust ratio. This confirms that mass accretion rates are related to the properties of the outer disk. We find no correlation between mass accretion rates and the disk mass measured by CO isotopologues emission lines, possibly owing to the small number of measured disk gas masses. This suggests that the mm-sized dust mass better traces the total disk mass and that masses derived from CO may be underestimated, at least in some cases.
  • To characterize the mechanisms of planet formation it is crucial to investigate the properties and evolution of protoplanetary disks around young stars, where the initial conditions for the growth of planets are set. Our goal is to study grain growth in the disk of the young, intermediate mass star HD163296 where dust processing has already been observed, and to look for evidence of growth by ice condensation across the CO snowline, already identified in this disk with ALMA. Under the hypothesis of optically thin emission we compare images at different wavelengths from ALMA and VLA to measure the opacity spectral index across the disk and thus the maximum grain size. We also use a Bayesian tool based on a two-layer disk model to fit the observations and constrain the dust surface density. The measurements of the opacity spectral index indicate the presence of large grains and pebbles ($\geq$1 cm) in the inner regions of the disk (inside $\sim$50 AU) and smaller grains, consistent with ISM sizes, in the outer disk (beyond 150 AU). Re-analysing ALMA Band 7 Science Verification data we find (radially) unresolved excess continuum emission centered near the location of the CO snowline at $\sim$90 AU. Our analysis suggests a grain size distribution consistent with an enhanced production of large grains at the CO snowline and consequent transport to the inner regions. Our results combined with the excess in infrared scattered light found by Garufi et al. (2014) suggests the presence of a structure at 90~AU involving the whole vertical extent of the disk. This could be evidence for small scale processing of dust at the CO snowline.
  • We present a study of the wind launching region of the Herbig Be star HD 58647 using high angular (lambda/2B=0.003") and high spectral (R=12000) resolution interferometric VLTI-AMBER observations of the near-infrared hydrogen emission line, Br-gamma. The star displays double peaks in both Br-gamma line profile and wavelength-dependent visibilities. The wavelength-dependent differential phases show S-shaped variations around the line centre. The visibility level increases in the line (by ~0.1) at the longest projected baseline (88 m), indicating that the size of the line emission region is smaller than the size of the K-band continuum-emitting region, which is expected to arise near the dust sublimation radius of the accretion disc. The data have been analysed using radiative transfer models to probe the geometry, size and physical properties of the wind that is emitting Br-gamma. We find that a model with a small magnetosphere and a disc wind with its inner radius located just outside of the magnetosphere can well reproduce the observed Br-gamma profile, wavelength-dependent visibilities, differential and closure phases, simultaneously. The mass-accretion and mass-loss rates adopted for the model are Mdot_a = 3.5 x 10^{-7} Msun/yr and Mdot_dw = 4.5 x 10^{-8} Msun/yr, respectively (Mdot_dw/Mdot_a =0.13). Consequently, about 60 per cent of the angular momentum loss rate required for a steady accretion with the measured accretion rate is provide by the disc wind. The small magnetosphere in HD 58647 does not contribute to the Br-gamma line emission significantly.
  • Theoretical models of grain growth predict dust properties to change as a function of protoplanetary disk radius, mass, age and other physical conditions. We lay down the methodology for a multi-wavelength analysis of (sub-)mm and cm continuum interferometric observations to constrain self-consistently the disk structure and the radial variation of the dust properties. The computational architecture is massively parallel and highly modular. The analysis is based on the simultaneous fit in the uv-plane of observations at several wavelengths with a model for the disk thermal emission and for the dust opacity. The observed flux density at the different wavelengths is fitted by posing constraints on the disk structure and on the radial variation of the grain size distribution. We apply the analysis to observations of three protoplanetary disks (AS 209, FT Tau, DR Tau) for which a combination of spatially resolved observations in the range ~0.88mm to ~10mm is available (from SMA, CARMA, and VLA), finding evidence of a decreasing maximum dust grain size (a_max) with radius. We derive large a_max values up to 1 cm in the inner disk between 15 and 30 AU and smaller grains with a_max~1 mm in the outer disk (R > 80AU). In this paper we develop a multi-wavelength analysis that will allow this missing quantity to be constrained for statistically relevant samples of disks and to investigate possible correlations with disk or stellar parameters.
  • Disks around T Tauri stars are known to lose mass, as best shown by the profiles of forbidden emission lines of low ionization species. At least two separate kinematic components have been identified, one characterised by velocity shifts of tens to hundreds km/s (HVC) and one with much lower velocity of few km/s (LVC). The HVC are convincingly associated to the emission of jets, but the origin of the LVC is still unknown. In this paper we analyze the forbidden line spectrum of a sample of 44 mostly low mass young stars in Lupus and $\sigma$-Ori observed with the X-Shooter ESO spectrometer. We detect forbidden line emission of [OI], [OII], [SII], [NI], and [NII], and characterize the line profiles as LVC, blue-shifted HVC and red-shifted HVC. We focus our study on the LVC. We show that there is a good correlation between line luminosity and both L$_{star}$ and the accretion luminosity (or the mass-accretion rate) over a large interval of values (L$_{star}$ $\sim 10^{-2} - 1$ L$_\odot$; L$_{acc}$ $\sim 10^{-5} - 10^{-1}$ L$_\odot$; $\dot M_{acc}$ $\sim 10^{-11} - 10^{-7}$ M$_\odot$/yr). The lines show the presence of a slow wind ($V_{peak}<20$ km/s), dense ($n_H>10^8$ cm$^{-3}$), warm (T$\sim 5000-10000$ K), mostly neutral. We estimate the mass of the emitting gas and provide a value for the maximum volume it occupies. Both quantities increase steeply with the stellar mass, from $\sim 10^{-12}$ M$_\odot$ and $\sim 0.01$ AU$^3$ for M$_{star}$$\sim 0.1$ M$_\odot$, to $\sim 3 \times 10^{-10}$ M$_\odot$ and $\sim 1$ AU$^3$ for M$_{star}$$\sim 1$ M$_\odot$, respectively. These results provide quite stringent constraints to wind models in low mass young stars, that need to be explored further.
  • We present ALMA continuum and spectral line data at 0.89 mm and 3.2 mm for three disks surrounding young brown dwarfs and very low mass stars in the Taurus star forming region. Dust thermal emission is detected and spatially resolved for all the three disks, while CO(J=3-2) emission is seen in two disks. We analyze the continuum visibilities and constrain the disks physical structure in dust. The results of our analysis show that the disks are relatively large, the smallest one with an outer radius of about 70 AU. The inferred disk radii, radial profiles of the dust surface density and disk to central object mass ratios lie within the ranges found for disks around more massive young stars. We derive from our observations the wavelength dependence of the millimeter dust opacity. In all the three disks data are consistent with the presence of grains with at least millimeter sizes, as also found for disks around young stars, and confirm that the early stages of the solid growth toward planetesimals occur also around very low mass objects. We discuss the implications of our findings on models of solids evolution in protoplanetary disks, on the main mechanisms proposed for the formation of brown dwarfs and very low mass stars, as well as on the potential of finding rocky and giant planets around very low mass objects.
  • We present new 3 mm ATCA data of two Class I Young Stellar Objects in the Ophiucus star forming region: Elias29 and WL12. For our analysis we compare them with archival 1.1 mm SMA data. In the (u,v) plane the two sources present a similar behavior: a nearly constant non-zero emission at long baselines, which suggests the presence of an unresolved component and an increase of the fluxes at short baselines, related to the presence of an extended envelope. Our data analysis leads to unusually low values of the spectral index $\alpha_{\rm 1.1-3mm}$, which may indicate that mm-sized dust grains have already formed both in the envelopes and in the disk-like structures at such early stages. To explore the possible scenarios for the interpretation of the sources we perform a radiative transfer modeling using a Monte Carlo code, in order to take into account possible deviations from the Rayleigh-Jeans and optically thin regimes. Comparison between the model outputs and the observations indicates that dust grains may form aggregates up to millimeter size already in the inner regions of the envelopes of Class I YSOs. Moreover, we conclude that the embedded disk-like structures in our two Class Is are probably very compact, in particular in the case of WL12, with outer radii down to tens of AU.
  • Transition disks are protoplanetary disks with inner depleted dust cavities and excellent candidates to investigate the dust evolution under the existence of a pressure bump. A pressure bump at the outer edge of the cavity allows dust grains from the outer regions to stop their rapid inward migration towards the star and efficiently grow to millimetre sizes. Dynamical interactions with planet(s) have been one of the most exciting theories to explain the clearing of the inner disk. We look for evidence of the presence of millimetre dust particles in transition disks by measuring their spectral index with new and available photometric data. We investigate the influence of the size of the dust depleted cavity on the disk integrated millimetre spectral index. We present the 3mm photometric observations carried out with PdBI of four transition disks: LkHa330, UXTauA, LRLL31, and LRLL67. We use available values of their fluxes at 345GHz to calculate their spectral index, as well as the spectral index for a sample of twenty transition disks. We compare the observations with two kind of models. In the first set of models, we consider coagulation and fragmentation of dust in a disk in which a cavity is formed by a massive planet located at different positions. The second set of models assumes disks with truncated inner parts at different radius and with power-law dust size distributions, where the maximum size of grains is calculated considering turbulence as the source of destructive collisions. We show that the integrated spectral index is higher for transition disks than for regular protoplanetary disks. For transition disks, the probability that the measured spectral index is positively correlated with the cavity radius is 95%. High angular resolution imaging of transition disks is needed to distinguish between the dust trapping scenario and the truncated disk case.
  • We present X-Shooter/VLT observations of a sample of 36 accreting low-mass stellar and sub-stellar objects (YSOs) in the Lupus star forming region, spanning a range in mass from ~0.03 to ~1.2Msun, but mostly with 0.1Msun < Mstar < 0.5Msun. Our aim is twofold: firstly, analyse the relationship between excess-continuum and line emission accretion diagnostics, and, secondly, to investigate the accretion properties in terms of the physical properties of the central object. The accretion luminosity (Lacc), and from it the accretion rate (Macc), is derived by modelling the excess emission, from the UV to the near-IR, as the continuum emission of a slab of hydrogen. The flux and luminosity (Ll) of a large number of emission lines of H, He, CaII, etc., observed simultaneously in the range from ~330nm to 2500nm, were computed. The luminosity of all the lines is well correlated with Lacc. We provide empirical relationships between Lacc and the luminosity of 39 emission lines, which have a lower dispersion as compared to previous relationships in the literature. Our measurements extend the Pab and Brg relationships to Lacc values about two orders of magnitude lower than those reported in previous studies. We confirm that different methodologies to measure Lacc and Macc yield significantly different results: Ha line profile modelling may underestimate Macc by 0.6 to 0.8dex with respect to Macc derived from continuum-excess measures. Such differences may explain the likely spurious bi-modal relationships between Macc and other YSOs properties reported in the literature. We derive Macc in the range 2e-12 -- 4e-8 Msun/yr and conclude that Macc is proportional to Mstar^1.8(+/-0.2), with a dispersion lower by a factor of about 2 than in previous studies. A number of properties indicate that the physical conditions of the accreting gas are similar over more than 5 orders of magnitude in Macc.
  • Grain growth in protoplanetary disks is the first step towards the formation of the rocky cores of planets. Models predict that grains grow, migrate, and fragment in the disk and predict varying dust properties as a function of radius, age, and physical properties. High-angular resolution observations at more than one (sub-)mm wavelength are the essential tool for constraining grain growth and migration on the disk midplane. We developed a procedure to analyze self-consistently multi wavelength (sub-)mm continuum interferometric observations of protoplanetary disks to constrain the radial distribution of dust properties. We apply this technique to existing multi frequency continuum mm observations of the disk around CQ Tau, a A8 pre-main sequence star with a well-studied disk. We demonstrate that our models can be used to simultaneously constrain the disk and dust structure. In CQ Tau, the best-fitting model has a radial dependence of the maximum grain size, which decreases from a few cm in the inner disk (<40 AU) to a few mm at 80 AU. Nevertheless, the currently available dataset does not allow us to exclude the possibility of a uniform grain size distribution at a 3sigma level.
  • The first steps toward planet formation involve the coagulation of small microscopic grains into larger and larger pebbles and rocks in gas-rich disks around young stars and brown dwarfs. Observations in the sub-millimeter can trace mm/cm-sized pebbles in the outer disks, and investigate the mechanisms of coagulation/fragmentation and radial migration of these solids. These represent key, yet not fully understood ingredients for our understanding of the formation of planetesimals, the building blocks of planets. Here we present the first results from an observational program using the ALMA and CARMA sub-mm/mm interferometers aimed at characterizing the dust properties and disk structure of young disks around brown dwarfs and very low mass stars. Given the physical conditions expected for these disks, they represent critical test beds for the models of the early stages of planet formation in proto-planetary disks.
  • Planets have been detected around a variety of stars, including low-mass objects, such as brown dwarfs. However, such extreme cases are challenging for planet formation models. Recent sub-millimeter observations of disks around brown dwarf measured low spectral indices of the continuum emission that suggest that dust grains grow to mm-sizes even in these very low mass environments. To understand the first steps of planet formation in scaled-down versions of T-Tauri disks, we investigate the physical conditions that can theoretically explain the growth from interstellar dust to millimeter-sized grains in disks around brown dwarf. We modeled the evolution of dust particles under conditions of low-mass disks around brown dwarfs. We used coagulation, fragmentation and disk-structure models to simulate the evolution of dust, with zero and non-zero radial drift. For the non-zero radial drift, we considered strong inhomogeneities in the gas surface density profile that mimic long-lived pressure bumps in the disk. We studied different scenarios that could lead to an agreement between theoretical models and the spectral slope found by millimeter observations. We find that fragmentation is less likely and rapid inward drift is more significant for particles in brown dwarf disks than in T-Tauri disks. We present different scenarios that can nevertheless explain millimeter-sized grains. As an example, a model that combines the following parameters can fit the millimeter fluxes measured for brown dwarf disks: strong pressure inhomogeneities of $\sim$ 40% of amplitude, a small radial extent $\sim$ 15 AU, a moderate turbulence strength $\alpha_{\mathrm{turb}}= 10^{-3}$, and average fragmentation velocities for ices $v_f = 10 m s^{-1}$.
  • Context. The lack of knowledge of photospheric parameters and the level of chromospheric activity in young low-mass pre-main sequence stars introduces uncertainties when measuring mass accretion rates in accreting (Class II) Young Stellar Objects. A detailed investigation of the effect of chromospheric emission on the estimates of mass accretion rate in young low-mass stars is still missing. This can be undertaken using samples of young diskless (Class III) K and M-type stars. Aims. Our goal is to measure the chromospheric activity of Class III pre main sequence stars to determine its effect on the estimates of accretion luminosity (Lacc) and mass accretion rate (Macc) in young stellar objects with disks. Methods. Using VLT/X-Shooter spectra we have analyzed a sample of 24 non-accreting young stellar objects of spectral type between K5 and M9.5. We identify the main emission lines normally used as tracers of accretion in Class II objects, and we determine their fluxes in order to estimate the contribution of the chromospheric activity to the line luminosity. Results. We have used the relationships between line luminosity and accretion luminosity derived in the literature for Class II objects to evaluate the impact of chromospheric activity on the accretion rate measurements. We find that the typical chromospheric activity would bias the derived accretion luminosity by Lacc,noise< 10-3Lsun, with a strong dependence with the Teff of the objects. The noise on Macc depends on stellar mass and age, and the typical values of log(Macc,noise) range between -9.2 to -11.6Msun/yr. Conclusions. Values of Lacc< 10-3Lsun obtained in accreting low-mass pre main sequence stars through line luminosity should be treated with caution as the line emission may be dominated by the contribution of chromospheric activity.
  • Characterization of the properties of young brown dwarfs are important to constraining the formation of objects at the extreme low-mass end of the IMF. While young brown dwarfs share many properties with solar-mass T Tauri stars, differences may be used as tests of how the physics of accretion/outflow and disk chemistry/dissipation depend on the mass of the central object. This article summarizes the presentations and discussions during the splinter session on 'Disks, accretion and outflows of brown dwarfs' held at the CoolStars17 conference in Barcelona in June 2012. Recent results in the field of brown dwarf disks and outflows include the determination of brown dwarf disk masses and geometries based on Herschel far-IR photometry (70-160 um), accretion properties based on X-Shooter spectra, and new outflow detections in the very low-mass regime.
  • We present ALMA continuum and spectral line observations of the young Brown Dwarf rho-Oph 102 at about 0.89 mm and 3.2 mm. We detect dust emission from the disk at these wavelengths and derive an upper limit on the radius of the dusty disk of ~ 40 AU. The derived variation of the dust opacity with frequency in the mm provides evidence for the presence of mm-sized grains in the disk outer regions. This result demonstrates that mm-grains are found even in the low density environments of Brown Dwarf disks and challenges our current understanding of dust evolution in disks. The CO map at 345 GHz clearly reveals molecular gas emission at the location of the Brown Dwarf, indicating a gas-rich disk as typically found for disks surrounding young pre-Main Sequence stars. We derive a disk mass of ~ 0.3-1% of the mass of the central Brown Dwarf, similar to the typical values found for disks around more massive young stars.
  • We present a census of the disk population for UKIDSS selected brown dwarfs in the 5-10 Myr old Upper Scorpius OB association. For 116 objects originally identified in UKIDSS, the majority of them not studied in previous publications, we obtain photometry from the WISE database. The resulting colour-magnitude and colour-colour plots clearly show two separate populations of objects, interpreted as brown dwarfs with disks (class II) and without disks (class III). We identify 27 class II brown dwarfs, 14 of them not previously known. This disk fraction (27 out of 116 or 23%) among brown dwarfs was found to be similar to results for K/M stars in Upper Scorpius, suggesting that the lifetimes of disks are independent of the mass of the central object for low-mass stars and brown dwarfs. 5 out of 27 disks (19%) lack excess at 3.4 and 4.6 microns and are potential transition disks (i.e. are in transition from class II to class III). The transition disk fraction is comparable to low-mass stars. We estimate that the timescale for a typical transition from class II to class III is less than 0.4 Myr for brown dwarfs. These results suggest that the evolution of brown dwarf disks mirrors the behaviour of disks around low-mass stars, with disk lifetimes on the order of 5-10 Myr and a disk clearing timescale significantly shorter than 1 Myr.