• By means of resonant inelastic x-ray scattering at the Cu L$_3$ edge, we measured the spin wave dispersion along $\langle$100$\rangle$ and $\langle$110$\rangle$ in the undoped cuprate Ca$_2$CuO$_2$Cl$_2$. The data yields a reliable estimate of the superexchange parameter $J$ = 135 $\pm$ 4 meV using a classical spin-1/2 2D Heisenberg model with nearest-neighbor interactions and including quantum fluctuations. Including further exchange interactions increases the estimate to $J$ = 141 meV. The 40 meV dispersion between the magnetic Brillouin zone boundary points (1/2,\,0) and (1/4,\,1/4) indicates that next-nearest neighbor interactions in this compound are intermediate between the values found in La$_{2}$CuO$_4$ and Sr$_2$CuO$_2$Cl$_2$. Owing to the low-$Z$ elements composing Ca$_2$CuO$_2$Cl$_2$, the present results may enable a reliable comparison with the predictions of quantum many-body calculations, which would improve our understanding of the role of magnetic excitations and of electronic correlations in cuprates.
  • Resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) at the $L$-edge of transition metal elements is now commonly used to probe single magnon excitations. Here we show that single magnon excitations can also be measured with RIXS at the $K$-edge of the surrounding ligand atoms when the center heavy metal elements have strong spin-orbit coupling. This is demonstrated with oxygen $K$-edge RIXS experiments on the perovskite Sr$_2$IrO$_4$, where low energy peaks from single magnon excitations were observed. This new application of RIXS has excellent potential to be applied to a wide range of magnetic systems based on heavy elements, for which the $L$-edge RIXS energy resolutions in the hard X-ray region is usually poor.
  • By a combined angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy and density functional theory study, we discover that the surface metallicity is polarity-driven in SmB$_6$. Two surface states, not accounted for by the bulk band structure, are reproduced by slab calculations for coexisting B$_6$ and Sm surface terminations. Our analysis reveals that a metallic surface state stems from an unusual property, generic to the (001) termination of all hexaborides: the presence of boron $2p$ dangling bonds, on a polar surface. The discovery of polarity-driven surface metallicity sheds new light on the 40-year old conundrum of the low-temperature residual conductivity of SmB$_6$, and raises a fundamental question in the field of topological Kondo insulators regarding the interplay between polarity and nontrivial topological properties.
  • Neutron and x-ray scattering experiments have provided mounting evidence for spin and charge ordering phenomena in underdoped cuprates. These range from early work on stripe correlations in Nd-LSCO to the latest discovery of charge-density-waves in YBCO. Both phenomena are characterized by a pronounced dependence on doping, temperature, and an externally applied magnetic field. Here we show that these electron-lattice instabilities exhibit also a previously unrecognized bulk-surface dichotomy. Surface-sensitive electronic and structural probes uncover a temperature-dependent evolution of the CuO2 plane band dispersion and apparent Fermi pockets in underdoped Bi2201, which is directly associated with an hitherto-undetected strong temperature dependence of the incommensurate superstructure periodicity below 130K. In stark contrast, the structural modulation revealed by bulk-sensitive probes is temperature independent. These findings point to a surface-enhanced incipient charge-density-wave instability, driven by Fermi surface nesting. This discovery is of critical importance in the interpretation of single-particle spectroscopy data and establishes the surface of cuprates and other complex oxides as a rich playground for the study of electronically soft phases.
  • In search of the potential realization of novel normal-state phases on the surface of Sr2RuO4 - those stemming from either topological bulk properties or the interplay between spin-orbit coupling (SO) and the broken symmetry of the surface - we revisit the electronic structure of the top-most layers by ARPES with improved data quality as well as ab-initio LDA slab calculations. We find that the current model of a single surface layer (\surd2x\surd2)R45{\deg} reconstruction does not explain all detected features. The observed depth-dependent signal degradation, together with the close quantitative agreement with LDA+SO slab calculations based on the LEED-determined surface crystal structure, reveal that (at a minimum) the sub-surface layer also undergoes a similar although weaker reconstruction. This points to a surface-to-bulk progression of the electronic states driven by structural instabilities, with no evidence for Dirac and Rashba-type states or surface magnetism.
  • ARPES is a priori a technique of choice to measure the Fermi velocities vF in metals. In correlated systems, it is interesting to compare this experimental value to that obtained in band structure calculations, as deviations are usually taken as a good indicator of the presence of strong electronic correlations. Nevertheless, it is not always straightforward to extract vF from ARPES spectra. We study here the case of layered cobaltates, an interesting family of correlated metals. We compare the results obtained by standard methods, namely the fit of spectra at constant momentum k (energy distribution curve, EDC) or constant binding energy omega(momentum distribution curve, MDC). We find that the difference of vF between the two methods can be as large as a factor 2. The reliability of the 2 methods is intimately linked to the degree of k- and omega-dependence of the electronic self-energy. As the k-dependence is usually much smaller than the omega dependence for a correlated system, the MDC analysis is generally expected to give more reliable results. However, we review here several examples within cobaltates, where the MDC analysis apparently leads to unphysical results, while the EDC analysis appears coherent. We attribute the difference between the EDC and MDC analysis to a strong variation of the photoemission intensity with the momentum k. This distorts the MDC lineshapes but does not affect the EDC ones. Simulations including a k dependence of the intensity allow to reproduce the difference between MDC and EDC analysis very well. This momentum dependence could be of extrinsic or intrinsic. We argue that the latter is the most likely and actually contains valuable information on the nature of the correlations that would be interesting to extract further.
  • Despite many ARPES investigations of iron pnictides, the structure of the electron pockets is still poorly understood. By combining ARPES measurements in different experimental configurations, we clearly resolve their elliptic shape. Comparison with band calculation identify a deep electron band with the dxy orbital and a shallow electron band along the perpendicular ellipse axis with the dxz/dyz orbitals. We find that, for both electron and hole bands, the lifetimes associated with dxy are longer than for dxz/dyz. This suggests that the two types of orbitals play different roles in the electronic properties and that their relative weight is a key parameter to determine the ground state.
  • We present a detailed comparison of the electronic structure of BaFe2As2 in its paramagnetic and antiferromagnetic (AFM) phases, through angle-resolved photoemission studies. Using different experimental geometries, we resolve the full elliptic shape of the electron pockets, including parts of dxy symmetry along its major axis that are usually missing. This allows us to define precisely how the hole and electron pockets are nested and how the different orbitals evolve at the transition. We conclude that the imperfect nesting between hole and electron pockets explains rather well the formation of gaps and residual metallic droplets in the AFM phase, provided the relative parity of the different bands is taken into account. Beyond this nesting picture, we observe shifts and splittings of numerous bands at the transition. We show that the splittings are surface sensitive and probably not a reliable signature of the magnetic order. On the other hand, the shifts indicate a significant redistribution of the orbital occupations at the transition, especially within the dxz/dyz system, which we discuss.
  • Similar to silicon that is the basis of conventional electronics, strontium titanate (SrTiO3) is the bedrock of the emerging field of oxide electronics. SrTiO3 is the preferred template to create exotic two-dimensional (2D) phases of electron matter at oxide interfaces, exhibiting metal-insulator transitions, superconductivity, or large negative magnetoresistance. However, the physical nature of the electronic structure underlying these 2D electron gases (2DEGs) remains elusive, although its determination is crucial to understand their remarkable properties. Here we show, using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES), that there is a highly metallic universal 2DEG at the vacuum-cleaved surface of SrTiO3, independent of bulk carrier densities over more than seven decades, including the undoped insulating material. This 2DEG is confined within a region of ~5 unit cells with a sheet carrier density of ~0.35 electrons per a^2 (a is the cubic lattice parameter). We unveil a remarkable electronic structure consisting on multiple subbands of heavy and light electrons. The similarity of this 2DEG with those reported in SrTiO3-based heterostructures and field-effect transistors suggests that different forms of electron confinement at the surface of SrTiO3 lead to essentially the same 2DEG. Our discovery provides a model system for the study of the electronic structure of 2DEGs in SrTiO3-based devices, and a novel route to generate 2DEGs at surfaces of transition-metal oxides.
  • Previous ARPES experiments in NaxCoO2 reported both a strongly renormalized bandwidth near the Fermi level and moderately renormalized Fermi velocities, leaving it unclear whether the correlations are weak or strong and how they could be quantified. We explain why this situation occurs and solve the problem by extracting clearly the coherent and incoherent parts of the band crossing the Fermi level. We show that one can use their relative weight to estimate self-consistently the quasiparticle weight Z, which turns out to be very small Z=0.15 +/- 0.05. We suggest this method could be a reliable way to study the evolution of correlations in cobaltates and for comparison with other strongly correlated systems.
  • We study with ARPES the electronic structure of CoO2 slabs, stacked with rock-salt (RS) layers exhibiting a different (misfit) periodicity. Fermi Surfaces (FS) in phases with different doping and/or periodicities reveal the influence of the RS potential on the electronic structure. We show that these RS potentials are well ordered, even in incommensurate phases, where STM images reveal broad stripes with width as large as 80\AA. The anomalous evolution of the FS area at low dopings is consistent with the localization of a fraction of the electrons. We propose that this is a new form of electronic ordering, induced by the potential of the stacked layers (RS or Na in NaxCoO2) when the FS becomes smaller than the Brillouin Zone of the stacked structure.
  • We present a comprehensive angle-resolved photoemission study of the three-dimensional electronic structure of Ba(Fe1-xCox)2As2. The wide range of dopings covered by this study, x=0 to x=0.3, allows to extract systematic features of the electronic structure. We show that there are three different hole pockets around the G point, the two inner ones being nearly degenerate and rather two dimensional, the outer one presenting a strong three dimensional character. The structure of the electron pockets is clarified by studying high doping contents, where they are enlarged. They are found to be essentially circular and two dimensional. From the size of the pockets, we deduce the number of holes and electrons present at the various dopings. We find that the net number of carriers is in good agreement with the bulk stoichiometry, but that the number of each species (holes and electrons) is smaller than predicted by theory. Finally, we discuss the quality of nesting in the different regions of the phase diagram. The presence of the third hole pocket significantly weakens the nesting at x=0, so that it may not be a crucial ingredient in the formation of the Spin Density Wave. On the other hand, superconductivity seems to be favored by the coexistence of two-dimensional hole and electron pockets of similar sizes.
  • We present the first angle-resolved photoemission (ARPES) measurement of Fermi Surface in the "misfit" cobaltate [Bi2Ba2O4].[CoO2]~2. This compound contains the same triangular Co planes as Na cobaltates, but in a different 3D environment. Our data establish the similarity of their electronic structure. We propose that the peculiar lineshape of all cobaltates is of the "peak-dip-hump" type, due to strong many-body effects. We detect a progressive transfer of spectral weight from the quasiparticle feature near Ef to a broad hump in misfit phases where Ba is replaced by Sr or Ca. This indicates stronger many-body interactions in proximity of the band insulator regime, which we attribute to the presence of unusual magnetic excitations.
  • We present an experimental study of the electronic structure of MnSi. Using X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy, X-ray photoemission and X-ray fluorescence we provide experimental evidence that MnSi has a mixed valence ground state. We show that self consistent LDA supercell calculations cannot replicate the XAS spectra of MnSi, while a good match is achieved within the atomic multiplet theory assuming a mixed valence ground state. We discuss the role of the electron-electron interactions in this compound and estimate that the valence fluctuations are suppressed by a factor of 2.5, which means that the Coulomb repulsion is not negligible.